MedClimate Health News Daily http://medclimate.com/feed en-us Copyright MedClimate, Inc2017 OIG investigating Tom Price's use of private jets for travel http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/tom-price-hhs-oig-private-planes-travel?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/tom-price-hhs-oig-private-planes-travel?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 22 Sep 2017 13:43:58 CDT Paige Minemyer at FierceHealthcare: Payer The Department of Health and Human Services Office of Inspector General is looking into Secretary Tom Price's use of private jets to travel to engagements, it confirmed Friday. An OIG spokesperson said in a statement that "work is underway and will be completed as soon as possible."  OIG investigating Tom Price's use of private jets for travel http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/tom-price-hhs-oig-private-planes-travel?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/tom-price-hhs-oig-private-planes-travel?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 22 Sep 2017 13:43:58 CDT Paige Minemyer at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare The Department of Health and Human Services Office of Inspector General is looking into Secretary Tom Price's use of private jets to travel to engagements, it confirmed Friday. An OIG spokesperson said in a statement that "work is underway and will be completed as soon as possible."  McCain says he won't vote for Graham-Cassidy bill http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/aca/mccain-says-he-won-t-vote-for-graham-cassidy-bill?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/aca/mccain-says-he-won-t-vote-for-graham-cassidy-bill?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 22 Sep 2017 13:35:01 CDT Leslie Small at FierceHealthcare: Payer The prospects for the GOP’s latest legislative attempt to repeal the Affordable Care Act just got a lot bleaker. Sen. John McCain said Friday that he won’t vote for the bill championed by Sen. Lindsey Graham and Sen. Bill Cassidy, citing problems with the process more than the substance of the legislation. McCain says he won't vote for Graham-Cassidy bill http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/aca/mccain-says-he-won-t-vote-for-graham-cassidy-bill?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/aca/mccain-says-he-won-t-vote-for-graham-cassidy-bill?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 22 Sep 2017 13:35:01 CDT Leslie Small at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare The prospects for the GOP’s latest legislative attempt to repeal the Affordable Care Act just got a lot bleaker. Sen. John McCain said Friday that he won’t vote for the bill championed by Sen. Lindsey Graham and Sen. Bill Cassidy, citing problems with the process more than the substance of the legislation. Despite deregulation, we won't let EHR makers run wild, ONC chief promises http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/despite-deregulation-we-wont-let-ehr-makers-run-wild-onc-chief-promises http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/despite-deregulation-we-wont-let-ehr-makers-run-wild-onc-chief-promises Fri, 22 Sep 2017 12:08:57 CDT walmeida at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy The Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT’s plans to change the ONC Health IT Certification Program has sparked some important questions. Wouldn’t allowing vendors to now simply say they're in compliance, rather than prove it in an ONC-Authorized Testing Laboratory, pave the way for EHR vendors to essentially flout the rules? And what’s to prevent more certification problems such as the eClinicalWorks $155 million settlement? Or as Andre Thenot tweeted Thursday, "ONC switches to pinky-swear instead of actual compliance testing. #whatcouldpossiblygowrong." ONC switches to pinky-swear instead of actual compliance testing. #whatcouldpossiblygowrong #HealthIT #EHR https://t.co/BgFh63AY1d — André Thénot (@athenot) September 21, 2017 But National Coordinator Donald Rucker, MD, said ONC wasn't sacrificing any of its regulatory oversight but was simply doing what it could to reduce the hoop-jumping required of vendors so they could better allocate their resources to more usable and interoperable products. "What we're trying to do here is make things as smooth as possible in the regulatory process," Rucker said Thursday during a call with reporters. "We're not changing the certification requirements, per se. We're doing a little bit of streamlining on the process. So that will hopefully, in part, reduce vendors costs – and in a market economy over time some of those savings come down to providers." With the new rules, compliance requirements remain the same as ever, according to ONC. But now, rather than vendors having to put in the work to demonstrate, for instance, a relatively simple functionality such as CPOE for medications to a test lab, they can simply affirm that their product does that task, while focusing more of their time and energy on innovation. But didn't the eClinicalWorks case show that sometimes a verbal promise isn't good enough? And that sometimes more stringent testing – showing, not telling – is necessary? Rucker doesn't think so. "The reality is that these are very public products," he said. "They have user bases who immediately know if something is working or not working. If a CPOE doesn't go through, these things are known almost instantaneously. So the vast bulk of the oversight is provided by those using the product. This has to be looked at in the broader context of use. That's where the data was coming from in prior enforcement actions." Actually, he said the eClinicalWorks case is "a perfect example that what we have in place in fact does work." The discrepancies with eCW's products were first "noted by end-users," he said. That case was ultimately investigated further thanks to reactive surveillance – not the randomized surveillance that would be reduced as part of these new rules. ONC still fully intends to take an aggressive approach to reactive surveillance. In fact, just this past month it updated its Health IT Feedback Form, making it easier and more intuitive for providers to approach the agency with complaints or concerns about their products. "Our experience is that people will report if there are issues with their product," said Rucker. He emphasized that all certification criteria are still in place and enforceable. And he said he didn't see much changing for ONC-Authorized Certification Bodies and ONC-Authorized Testing Laboratories. The self-declarable criteria are all relatively basic functionalities, after all. Those that require conformance testing to interoperability standards are still being affirmed by ONC-ATLs. "There are a lot of things that are still being tested," he said. And even for those criteria that are now self-declarable, "you still have to know how to solve the equation. It doesn't change what you have to learn." In other words, even with the new rules, when a product is certified, the vendor is attesting that it does what it's supposed to do. If that's later found out not to be the case, either by an ACB or through subsequent reactive surveillance, ONC will take action – correcting where there is a non-conformity or even decertifying a given product. The bulk of certified technologies "do exactly what is asked of them from the certification criteria," said Rucker. "Building medical software is a highly iterative process. And there are many inputs on this. Because these foundations tend to be so heavily used – minute in, minute out – things become obvious relatively rapidly." The aim here, said Rucker, is to "increase the operational efficiency of the vendors to the extent that we can. Because those (testing) costs are all eventually, sooner or later, borne by the providers purchasing the products." Twitter: @MikeMiliardHITN Email the writer: mike.miliard@himssmedia.com Primary Topic: ComplianceAdditional Topics: PolicyMeaningful UseTechnologyEHRPolicyInteroperabilityTechnologyQuality & SafetyTechnologyTechnologyEHRSpecific Terms: ComplianceElectronic Health RecordsElectronic Health RecordsCustom Tags: ComplianceElectronic Health RecordsInteroperabilityQuality & SafetyElectronic Health RecordsDisable Auto Tagging: 

The Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT’s plans to change the ONC Health IT Certification Program has sparked some important questions. Wouldn’t allowing vendors to now simply say they're in compliance, rather than prove it in an ONC-Authorized Testing Laboratory, pave the way for EHR vendors to essentially flout the rules? And what’s to prevent more certification problems such as the eClinicalWorks $155 million settlement?

Or as Andre Thenot tweeted Thursday, "ONC switches to pinky-swear instead of actual compliance testing. #whatcouldpossiblygowrong."

ONC switches to pinky-swear instead of actual compliance testing. #whatcouldpossiblygowrong #HealthIT #EHR https://t.co/BgFh63AY1d

— André Thénot (@athenot) September 21, 2017

But National Coordinator Donald Rucker, MD, said ONC wasn't sacrificing any of its regulatory oversight but was simply doing what it could to reduce the hoop-jumping required of vendors so they could better allocate their resources to more usable and interoperable products.

"What we're trying to do here is make things as smooth as possible in the regulatory process," Rucker said Thursday during a call with reporters. "We're not changing the certification requirements, per se. We're doing a little bit of streamlining on the process. So that will hopefully, in part, reduce vendors costs – and in a market economy over time some of those savings come down to providers."

With the new rules, compliance requirements remain the same as ever, according to ONC. But now, rather than vendors having to put in the work to demonstrate, for instance, a relatively simple functionality such as CPOE for medications to a test lab, they can simply affirm that their product does that task, while focusing more of their time and energy on innovation.

But didn't the eClinicalWorks case show that sometimes a verbal promise isn't good enough? And that sometimes more stringent testing – showing, not telling – is necessary?

Rucker doesn't think so.

"The reality is that these are very public products," he said. "They have user bases who immediately know if something is working or not working. If a CPOE doesn't go through, these things are known almost instantaneously. So the vast bulk of the oversight is provided by those using the product. This has to be looked at in the broader context of use. That's where the data was coming from in prior enforcement actions."

Actually, he said the eClinicalWorks case is "a perfect example that what we have in place in fact does work."

The discrepancies with eCW's products were first "noted by end-users," he said. That case was ultimately investigated further thanks to reactive surveillance – not the randomized surveillance that would be reduced as part of these new rules.

ONC still fully intends to take an aggressive approach to reactive surveillance. In fact, just this past month it updated its Health IT Feedback Form, making it easier and more intuitive for providers to approach the agency with complaints or concerns about their products.

"Our experience is that people will report if there are issues with their product," said Rucker.

He emphasized that all certification criteria are still in place and enforceable. And he said he didn't see much changing for ONC-Authorized Certification Bodies and ONC-Authorized Testing Laboratories.

The self-declarable criteria are all relatively basic functionalities, after all. Those that require conformance testing to interoperability standards are still being affirmed by ONC-ATLs.

"There are a lot of things that are still being tested," he said. And even for those criteria that are now self-declarable, "you still have to know how to solve the equation. It doesn't change what you have to learn."

In other words, even with the new rules, when a product is certified, the vendor is attesting that it does what it's supposed to do. If that's later found out not to be the case, either by an ACB or through subsequent reactive surveillance, ONC will take action – correcting where there is a non-conformity or even decertifying a given product.

The bulk of certified technologies "do exactly what is asked of them from the certification criteria," said Rucker. "Building medical software is a highly iterative process. And there are many inputs on this. Because these foundations tend to be so heavily used – minute in, minute out – things become obvious relatively rapidly."

The aim here, said Rucker, is to "increase the operational efficiency of the vendors to the extent that we can. Because those (testing) costs are all eventually, sooner or later, borne by the providers purchasing the products."

Twitter: @MikeMiliardHITN
Email the writer: mike.miliard@himssmedia.com

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Advocacy group uses Pokemon-inspired game to raise doctors' awareness about rare diseases http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/advocacy-group-pokemon-doctor-awareness-rare-diseases?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/advocacy-group-pokemon-doctor-awareness-rare-diseases?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 22 Sep 2017 11:14:23 CDT Joanne Finnegan at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare A nine-year-old Pokemon-loving boy named Jonah is the inspiration for an initiative aimed at educating physicians about ultrarare diseases. Jonah was diagnosed in 2011 with one of those ultrarare diseases, Sanfilippo Type C, a genetic disorder for which there is currently no cure. OIG: Acute care hospitals owe Medicare $51.6M, CMS agrees to provider clawbacks http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/oig-medicare-overpayment-acute-care-hospitals-audit?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/oig-medicare-overpayment-acute-care-hospitals-audit?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 22 Sep 2017 11:06:48 CDT Paige Minemyer at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Medicare inappropriately paid millions to acute care hospitals for outpatient services they provided to patients who were inpatients at other facilities, according to a new OIG report. CMS has agreed to claw back those payments and require hospitals to refund patient co-pays and deductibles.  OIG: Acute care hospitals owe Medicare $51.6M, CMS agrees to provider clawbacks http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/oig-medicare-overpayment-acute-care-hospitals-audit?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/oig-medicare-overpayment-acute-care-hospitals-audit?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 22 Sep 2017 11:06:48 CDT Paige Minemyer at FierceHealthcare: Payer Medicare inappropriately paid millions to acute care hospitals for outpatient services they provided to patients who were inpatients at other facilities, according to a new OIG report. CMS has agreed to claw back those payments and require hospitals to refund patient co-pays and deductibles.  NIH precision medicine campaign targets underserved populations distrustful of clinical research http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/it/nih-precision-medicine-all-us-data-genomics-research?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/it/nih-precision-medicine-all-us-data-genomics-research?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 22 Sep 2017 11:05:43 CDT Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: It In its effort to collect health data from 1 million people, NIH has made it a priority to involve low-income and minority populations that are left out of medical research. But the agency overseeing the "All of Us" campaign will have to overcome significant distrust to convince participants to hand over sensitive genomic data. NIH precision medicine campaign targets underserved populations distrustful of clinical research http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/it/nih-precision-medicine-all-us-data-genomics-research?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/it/nih-precision-medicine-all-us-data-genomics-research?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 22 Sep 2017 11:05:43 CDT Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare In its effort to collect health data from 1 million people, NIH has made it a priority to involve low-income and minority populations that are left out of medical research. But the agency overseeing the "All of Us" campaign will have to overcome significant distrust to convince participants to hand over sensitive genomic data. NIH precision medicine campaign targets underserved populations distrustful of clinical research http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/it/nih-precision-medicine-all-us-data-genomics-research?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/it/nih-precision-medicine-all-us-data-genomics-research?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 22 Sep 2017 11:05:43 CDT Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: It In its effort to collect health data from 1 million people, NIH has made it a priority to involve low-income and minority populations that are left out of medical research. But the agency overseeing the "All of Us" campaign will have to overcome significant distrust to convince participants to hand over sensitive genomic data. In light of federal lawsuits, physician practices need to get smart about risk adjustment coding http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/physician-practices-risk-adjustment-coding-doj-lawsuits-unitedhealth?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/physician-practices-risk-adjustment-coding-doj-lawsuits-unitedhealth?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 22 Sep 2017 10:10:58 CDT Joanne Finnegan at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare A federal lawsuit has focused attention on how the industry uses medical codes for risk adjustment. While the lawsuit doesn’t involve physician practices, it’s a heads-up for them to pay attention to risk adjustment coding. In light of federal lawsuits, physician practices need to get smart about risk adjustment coding http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/physician-practices-risk-adjustment-coding-doj-lawsuits-unitedhealth?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/physician-practices-risk-adjustment-coding-doj-lawsuits-unitedhealth?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 22 Sep 2017 10:10:58 CDT Joanne Finnegan at FierceHealthcare: Payer A federal lawsuit has focused attention on how the industry uses medical codes for risk adjustment. While the lawsuit doesn’t involve physician practices, it’s a heads-up for them to pay attention to risk adjustment coding. Stanford researchers call for ‘interim regulations’ on mental health chatbots to limit patient harm http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/mobile/stanford-chatbots-mental-health-technology-research-jama?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/mobile/stanford-chatbots-mental-health-technology-research-jama?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 22 Sep 2017 10:10:04 CDT Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: It As more people turn to their smartphone or computer to discuss mental health issues, regulators and industry leaders are faced with some difficult questions about how to adequately address the safety and efficacy of rapidly advancing chatbots. A trio of Stanford researchers is calling for "interim regulations" to chatbots to prevent foreseeable harms. Stanford researchers call for ‘interim regulations’ on mental health chatbots to limit patient harm http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/mobile/stanford-chatbots-mental-health-technology-research-jama?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/mobile/stanford-chatbots-mental-health-technology-research-jama?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 22 Sep 2017 10:10:04 CDT Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare As more people turn to their smartphone or computer to discuss mental health issues, regulators and industry leaders are faced with some difficult questions about how to adequately address the safety and efficacy of rapidly advancing chatbots. A trio of Stanford researchers is calling for "interim regulations" to chatbots to prevent foreseeable harms. Stanford researchers call for ‘interim regulations’ on mental health chatbots to limit patient harm http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/mobile/stanford-chatbots-mental-health-technology-research-jama?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/mobile/stanford-chatbots-mental-health-technology-research-jama?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 22 Sep 2017 10:10:04 CDT Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: It As more people turn to their smartphone or computer to discuss mental health issues, regulators and industry leaders are faced with some difficult questions about how to adequately address the safety and efficacy of rapidly advancing chatbots. A trio of Stanford researchers is calling for "interim regulations" to chatbots to prevent foreseeable harms. A third of rural hospitals at risk for closure; extension of federal programs could provide relief http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/rural-hospitals-finance-hospital-closure-340b?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/rural-hospitals-finance-hospital-closure-340b?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 22 Sep 2017 10:07:11 CDT Paige Minemyer at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare A third of rural hospitals are at risk for closure, and those closures have a ripple effect on rural communities. But there are steps lawmakers can take to bolster struggling rural hospitals, experts say. Payer Roundup—New York to give Aetna $9.4M tax break package; Graham-Cassidy bill benefits select states http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/payer-roundup-new-york-to-give-aetna-9-4m-tax-break-package-graham-cassidy-bill-benefits?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/payer-roundup-new-york-to-give-aetna-9-4m-tax-break-package-graham-cassidy-bill-benefits?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 22 Sep 2017 09:43:58 CDT Leslie Small at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Aetna will score a sizable tax break with its move from Connecticut to New York; the Graham-Cassidy bill will exempt Alaska and Montana from some Medicaid cuts; and other industry news. State AGs push health insurers to rein in opioid prescriptions, fail to acknowledge they're already doing so http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/how-do-health-insurance-companies-control-opioid-abuse?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/how-do-health-insurance-companies-control-opioid-abuse?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 22 Sep 2017 09:34:38 CDT Gienna Shaw at FierceHealthcare: Payer State attorneys general battling the opioid crisis have turned their attention to health insurance companies and “unnecessary overprescription” of the class of painkillers. The letter urges payers to take action without acknowledging the many steps insurers have already taken. State AGs push health insurers to rein in opioid prescriptions, fail to acknowledge they're already doing so http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/how-do-health-insurance-companies-control-opioid-abuse?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/how-do-health-insurance-companies-control-opioid-abuse?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 22 Sep 2017 09:34:38 CDT Gienna Shaw at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare State attorneys general battling the opioid crisis have turned their attention to health insurance companies and “unnecessary overprescription” of the class of painkillers. The letter urges payers to take action without acknowledging the many steps insurers have already taken. ONC scales back EHR certification process requirements, catching industry groups by surprise http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/onc-ehr-certification-health-it-himss-amia-chime-interoperability?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/onc-ehr-certification-health-it-himss-amia-chime-interoperability?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 22 Sep 2017 08:37:40 CDT Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: It ONC officials announced on Thursday that the agency is pulling back on regulations governing EHR certification by allowing vendors to "self-declare" compliance with more than half of 2015 Edition certification criteria. The move came as a shock to health IT groups that were still grappling with the potential downstream impacts. ONC scales back EHR certification process requirements, catching industry groups by surprise http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/onc-ehr-certification-health-it-himss-amia-chime-interoperability?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/onc-ehr-certification-health-it-himss-amia-chime-interoperability?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 22 Sep 2017 08:37:40 CDT Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: It ONC officials announced on Thursday that the agency is pulling back on regulations governing EHR certification by allowing vendors to "self-declare" compliance with more than half of 2015 Edition certification criteria. The move came as a shock to health IT groups that were still grappling with the potential downstream impacts. ONC scales back EHR certification process requirements, catching industry groups by surprise http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/onc-ehr-certification-health-it-himss-amia-chime-interoperability?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/onc-ehr-certification-health-it-himss-amia-chime-interoperability?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 22 Sep 2017 08:37:40 CDT Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare ONC officials announced on Thursday that the agency is pulling back on regulations governing EHR certification by allowing vendors to "self-declare" compliance with more than half of 2015 Edition certification criteria. The move came as a shock to health IT groups that were still grappling with the potential downstream impacts. CMS wants 'new direction' for its innovation center, but lawmakers say it is an attempt to undermine Medicare http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/cms-seeks-new-direction-for-its-innovation-center?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/cms-seeks-new-direction-for-its-innovation-center?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 22 Sep 2017 08:15:39 CDT Paige Minemyer at FierceHealthcare: Payer The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services wants to take its innovation center in a "new direction" and is seeking feedback on payment models it has already developed. But Democratic lawmakers are concerned it's an attempt to undermine the agency. CMS wants 'new direction' for its innovation center, but lawmakers say it is an attempt to undermine Medicare http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/cms-seeks-new-direction-for-its-innovation-center?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/cms-seeks-new-direction-for-its-innovation-center?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 22 Sep 2017 08:15:39 CDT Paige Minemyer at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services wants to take its innovation center in a "new direction" and is seeking feedback on payment models it has already developed. But Democratic lawmakers are concerned it's an attempt to undermine the agency. More states allow it, but many doctors unprepared to prescribe medical marijuana http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/doctors-prescribe-medical-marijuana?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/doctors-prescribe-medical-marijuana?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Thu, 21 Sep 2017 16:55:05 CDT Joanne Finnegan at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare While many states have legalized medical marijuana, few medical schools are teaching future doctors anything about the subject. Nine out of 10 doctors say they are unprepared to prescribe medical marijuana and just over 35% say they are not prepared to answer patient questions about the drug, according to a study. Graham-Cassidy bill's pre-existing condition protections an 'empty promise,' experts say http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/aca/graham-cassidy-pre-existing-conditions-hempstead-jost?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/aca/graham-cassidy-pre-existing-conditions-hempstead-jost?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Thu, 21 Sep 2017 16:31:07 CDT Leslie Small at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare As has been the case with previous Republican healthcare bills, the national conversation surrounding Sen. Bill Cassidy and Sen. Lindsey Graham’s legislation has become fixated on one issue: pre-existing conditions. With Jimmy Kimmel making one claim and President Donald Trump hitting back with another, we asked healthcare policy experts to settle the dispute over the law's protections for sick enrollees. Graham-Cassidy bill's pre-existing condition protections an 'empty promise,' experts say http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/aca/graham-cassidy-pre-existing-conditions-hempstead-jost?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/aca/graham-cassidy-pre-existing-conditions-hempstead-jost?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Thu, 21 Sep 2017 16:31:07 CDT Leslie Small at FierceHealthcare: Payer As has been the case with previous Republican healthcare bills, the national conversation surrounding Sen. Bill Cassidy and Sen. Lindsey Graham’s legislation has become fixated on one issue: pre-existing conditions. With Jimmy Kimmel making one claim and President Donald Trump hitting back with another, we asked healthcare policy experts to settle the dispute over the law's protections for sick enrollees. Court ruling gives doctors reason to review consent process http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/given-court-decision-physicians-should-review-consent-process?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/given-court-decision-physicians-should-review-consent-process?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Thu, 21 Sep 2017 11:30:19 CDT Joanne Finnegan at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare The Supreme Court of Pennsylvania ruled recently that only the physician performing a procedure should be involved in the consent discussion with patients. While it applies to just one state, the ruling offers surgeons and other physicians a compelling reason to conduct an assessment of their consent process. Leaders at Partners HealthCare, Mayo Clinic join AMA’s mHealth collaboration http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/mobile/leaders-at-partners-healthcare-mayo-clinic-join-ama-s-mhelath-collaboration?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/mobile/leaders-at-partners-healthcare-mayo-clinic-join-ama-s-mhelath-collaboration?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Thu, 21 Sep 2017 11:25:50 CDT Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: It Digital health leaders at Partners HealthCare and the Mayo Clinic are among the four new members adding their expertise to Xcertia, the American Medical Association’s recently launched collaboration to improve mobile health apps. Mayo Clinic's Steve Ommen and Partners HealthCare's Joseph Kvedar bring significant experience to the initiative. Leaders at Partners HealthCare, Mayo Clinic join AMA’s mHealth collaboration http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/mobile/leaders-at-partners-healthcare-mayo-clinic-join-ama-s-mhelath-collaboration?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/mobile/leaders-at-partners-healthcare-mayo-clinic-join-ama-s-mhelath-collaboration?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Thu, 21 Sep 2017 11:25:50 CDT Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: It Digital health leaders at Partners HealthCare and the Mayo Clinic are among the four new members adding their expertise to Xcertia, the American Medical Association’s recently launched collaboration to improve mobile health apps. Mayo Clinic's Steve Ommen and Partners HealthCare's Joseph Kvedar bring significant experience to the initiative. Leaders at Partners HealthCare, Mayo Clinic join AMA’s mHealth collaboration http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/mobile/leaders-at-partners-healthcare-mayo-clinic-join-ama-s-mhelath-collaboration?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/mobile/leaders-at-partners-healthcare-mayo-clinic-join-ama-s-mhelath-collaboration?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Thu, 21 Sep 2017 11:25:50 CDT Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Digital health leaders at Partners HealthCare and the Mayo Clinic are among the four new members adding their expertise to Xcertia, the American Medical Association’s recently launched collaboration to improve mobile health apps. Mayo Clinic's Steve Ommen and Partners HealthCare's Joseph Kvedar bring significant experience to the initiative. Tom Price draws ire for travel on private jets; HHS' Charmaine Yoest explains he has a 'demanding schedule' http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/tom-price-draws-ire-for-use-private-jets-hhs-says-it-s-due-to-a-demanding-schedule?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/tom-price-draws-ire-for-use-private-jets-hhs-says-it-s-due-to-a-demanding-schedule?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Thu, 21 Sep 2017 11:12:37 CDT Paige Minemyer at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Department of Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price is under fire for taking chartered jets to engagements, in stark contrast to his predecessors, who would typically fly commercial. This comes as Price looks to curb expenses at the agency. Unless Congress acts, NQF funding will expire http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/unless-congress-acts-nqf-funding-will-expire?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/unless-congress-acts-nqf-funding-will-expire?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Thu, 21 Sep 2017 10:49:02 CDT Joanne Finnegan at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare If Congress doesn't act, funding for the National Quality Forum could run out and potentially jeopardize the country's transition to value-based care, according to the CEOs of five physician groups. The leaders called on Congress to appropriate the $30 million annual in funding for the NQF that will allow it to continue its work. Hospital leaders see promise of digital innovation, but struggle to overcome financial and operational barriers http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/mobile/hospital-leaders-see-promise-digital-innovation-but-struggle-to-overcome-financial-and?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/mobile/hospital-leaders-see-promise-digital-innovation-but-struggle-to-overcome-financial-and?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Thu, 21 Sep 2017 10:40:25 CDT Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: It Hosptial leaders see the importance of digital innovation to solidify long-term success, but a lack of capital funding, under-resourced IT departments and regulatory uncertainty are preventing them from making significant investments. These barriers have led many facilities to invest in a dedicated innovation center. Hospital leaders see promise of digital innovation, but struggle to overcome financial and operational barriers http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/mobile/hospital-leaders-see-promise-digital-innovation-but-struggle-to-overcome-financial-and?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/mobile/hospital-leaders-see-promise-digital-innovation-but-struggle-to-overcome-financial-and?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Thu, 21 Sep 2017 10:40:25 CDT Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: It Hosptial leaders see the importance of digital innovation to solidify long-term success, but a lack of capital funding, under-resourced IT departments and regulatory uncertainty are preventing them from making significant investments. These barriers have led many facilities to invest in a dedicated innovation center. Hospital leaders see promise of digital innovation, but struggle to overcome financial and operational barriers http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/mobile/hospital-leaders-see-promise-digital-innovation-but-struggle-to-overcome-financial-and?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/mobile/hospital-leaders-see-promise-digital-innovation-but-struggle-to-overcome-financial-and?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Thu, 21 Sep 2017 10:40:25 CDT Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Hosptial leaders see the importance of digital innovation to solidify long-term success, but a lack of capital funding, under-resourced IT departments and regulatory uncertainty are preventing them from making significant investments. These barriers have led many facilities to invest in a dedicated innovation center. ONC dials back meaningful use certification program http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/onc-dials-back-meaningful-use-certification-program http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/onc-dials-back-meaningful-use-certification-program Thu, 21 Sep 2017 10:19:52 CDT walmeida at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy The Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT on Thursday revealed two changes to its certification criteria that officials said are designed to reduce the burden on industry and make the meaningful use program more efficient. The first is making more than half of test procedures self-declarable and the second is more discretion around randomized surveillance of certified health IT products. [Also: 4 former national coordinators, a CIO and a CEO weigh in on how to fix meaningful use] Elise Anthony, director of policy at ONC, and Steven Posnack, director of ONC’s Office of Standards and Technology, wrote on the Health IT Buzz blog that 30 of the 55 criteria were intended to support CMS Quality Payment Program and those are now self-declaration only. “This means that health IT developers will self-declare their product's conformance to these criteria without having to spend valuable time testing with an ONC-Authorized Testing Laboratory,” Anthony and Posnack added. “The test procedures for health IT products now designated as ‘self-declaration’ are for functionality-based certification criteria.” The second change ONC made on Thursday relates to randomized surveillance of ONC-Authorized Certification Bodies. The ACBs are required to conduct randomized surveillance for at least two percent of the health IT products they certify. [Also: Digital divide widening in hospital EHR deployments, report says] “ONC will not, until further notice, audit ONC-ACBs for compliance with randomized surveillance requirements or otherwise take administrative or other action to enforce such requirements against ONC-ACBs,” Anthony and Posnack wrote. “This exercise of enforcement discretion will permit ONC-ACBs to prioritize complaint-driven, or reactive, surveillance and allow them to devote their resources to certifying health IT to the 2015 Edition.”   ONC said that these changes are intended to ease the burden on health IT developers and certification bodies so they can focus more on interoperability. “This change enables ONC-ATLs and health IT developers to devote more of their resources to the remaining interoperability-oriented criteria, aligning with the tenets of the 21st Century Cures Act,” Anthony and Posnack wrote.   Twitter: SullyHIT Email the writer: tom.sullivan@himssmedia.com Primary Topic: Electronic Health RecordsAdditional Topics: TechnologyEHRPolicyMeaningful UsePolicyMeaningful UsePolicySpecific Terms: Electronic Health RecordsCustom Tags: Electronic Health RecordsMeaningful UseMeaningful UseDisable Auto Tagging: 

The Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT on Thursday revealed two changes to its certification criteria that officials said are designed to reduce the burden on industry and make the meaningful use program more efficient.

The first is making more than half of test procedures self-declarable and the second is more discretion around randomized surveillance of certified health IT products.

[Also: 4 former national coordinators, a CIO and a CEO weigh in on how to fix meaningful use]

Elise Anthony, director of policy at ONC, and Steven Posnack, director of ONC’s Office of Standards and Technology, wrote on the Health IT Buzz blog that 30 of the 55 criteria were intended to support CMS Quality Payment Program and those are now self-declaration only.

“This means that health IT developers will self-declare their product's conformance to these criteria without having to spend valuable time testing with an ONC-Authorized Testing Laboratory,” Anthony and Posnack added. “The test procedures for health IT products now designated as ‘self-declaration’ are for functionality-based certification criteria.”

The second change ONC made on Thursday relates to randomized surveillance of ONC-Authorized Certification Bodies. The ACBs are required to conduct randomized surveillance for at least two percent of the health IT products they certify.

[Also: Digital divide widening in hospital EHR deployments, report says]

“ONC will not, until further notice, audit ONC-ACBs for compliance with randomized surveillance requirements or otherwise take administrative or other action to enforce such requirements against ONC-ACBs,” Anthony and Posnack wrote. “This exercise of enforcement discretion will permit ONC-ACBs to prioritize complaint-driven, or reactive, surveillance and allow them to devote their resources to certifying health IT to the 2015 Edition.”  

ONC said that these changes are intended to ease the burden on health IT developers and certification bodies so they can focus more on interoperability.

“This change enables ONC-ATLs and health IT developers to devote more of their resources to the remaining interoperability-oriented criteria, aligning with the tenets of the 21st Century Cures Act,” Anthony and Posnack wrote.  

Twitter: SullyHIT
Email the writer: tom.sullivan@himssmedia.com

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States approve steep rate hikes for ACA exchange plans http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/aca/states-approve-steep-rate-hikes-for-aca-exchange-plans?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/aca/states-approve-steep-rate-hikes-for-aca-exchange-plans?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Thu, 21 Sep 2017 10:06:52 CDT Leslie Small at FierceHealthcare: Payer Health insurers have warned that without more policy certainty—particularly for cost-sharing reduction payments—they would be forced to request steep rate hikes in the individual marketplaces. Now, their predictions are proving true. States approve steep rate hikes for ACA exchange plans http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/aca/states-approve-steep-rate-hikes-for-aca-exchange-plans?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/aca/states-approve-steep-rate-hikes-for-aca-exchange-plans?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Thu, 21 Sep 2017 10:06:52 CDT Leslie Small at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Health insurers have warned that without more policy certainty—particularly for cost-sharing reduction payments—they would be forced to request steep rate hikes in the individual marketplaces. Now, their predictions are proving true.