MedClimate Health News Daily http://medclimate.com/feed en-us Copyright MedClimate, Inc2019 Opinion: Digital health - professionalism, careers and inclusivity http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/europe/opinion-digital-health-professionalism-careers-and-inclusivity http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/europe/opinion-digital-health-professionalism-careers-and-inclusivity Thu, 18 Jul 2019 01:34:25 CDT Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com Almost every informatics manager you speak to, will tell you about problems attracting, recruiting and retaining high quality informatics staff. We also know the problem is likely to get worse rather than better, as greater numbers and more highly skilled and specialist staff are needed in the future. Interface at Royal Papworth marks the first ever UK connection between Lorenzo and the Epic EPR systems http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/europe/interface-royal-papworth-marks-first-ever-uk-connection-between-lorenzo-and-epic-epr http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/europe/interface-royal-papworth-marks-first-ever-uk-connection-between-lorenzo-and-epic-epr Thu, 18 Jul 2019 00:54:56 CDT at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com The integration allows blood test results to be shared electronically with Cambridge University Hospitals. Age, race disparities found in the use of hospital patient portals http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/age-race-disparities-found-use-hospital-patient-portals http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/age-race-disparities-found-use-hospital-patient-portals Wed, 17 Jul 2019 14:40:27 CDT at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com Patients age 60 and over used the portal less than younger patients, and African Americans used the portal less than white patients. Intermountain launches new spinoff with focus on value-based care http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/intermountain-launches-new-spinoff-focus-value-based-care http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/intermountain-launches-new-spinoff-focus-value-based-care Wed, 17 Jul 2019 11:45:02 CDT at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com Castell will offer technologies and services to guide care decisions, manage patient experience, implement virtual care, address social determinants and more, building from the health system's own best practices. UK MP faults continuing use of technology susceptible to cyber-attack in NHS http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/europe/uk-mp-faults-continuing-use-technology-susceptible-cyber-attack-nhs http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/europe/uk-mp-faults-continuing-use-technology-susceptible-cyber-attack-nhs Wed, 17 Jul 2019 10:06:58 CDT at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com Responding to an answer in parliament by junior health minister, Labour’s shadow Cabinet Officer minister Jo Platt warned the government of the dangers of the 2,300 NHS computers which still run on Windows XP. UK MP faults continuing use of technology susceptible to cyber-attack in NHS http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/europe/uk-mp-faults-continuing-use-technology-susceptible-cyber-attack-nhs http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/europe/uk-mp-faults-continuing-use-technology-susceptible-cyber-attack-nhs Wed, 17 Jul 2019 10:06:58 CDT dyogendra at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy Although the numbers of computers using Windows XP make up just 0.16% of the NHS IT estate (a decrease from 4.7% in 2017), Jo Platt claims it reflects the lack of resources the government is investing into updating cybersecurity systems. A 2017 report by the National Audit Office directly connected the use of Windows XP with increased cyber weakness. Indeed, Microsoft halted support of the system in 2014. Consequences of cyber-attacks include doctors not being able to view patients’ test results or scans, hackers having access to personal information or even tampering with medical records. THE LARGER TREND Platt’s warning followed the report presented by Lord Darzi (co-director of the Institute of Global Health Innovation) to the House of Lords calling for drastic improvements in NHS cybersecurity. He asked for the hiring of more cybersecurity experts into IT teams, integrating “fire-breaks” into networks allowing specific systems to be isolated and having clearer information and advice available on cybersecurity issues. Since the spread of the WannaCry virus produced serious disorders in NHS organisations in 2017 and cost the NHS an estimated £92m, awareness of cybersecurity has increased and the government has pledged that the NHS would update all its devices by January 2020.   ON THE RECORD Jo Platt emphasised that, “The Government is seriously lacking the leadership, strategy and co-ordination we need across the public sector to keep us and our data safe and secure. How many more warnings will it take before they listen and take action?” Lord Darzi, co-director of IGHI, noted, “We are in the midst of a technological revolution that is transforming the way we deliver and receive care. But as we become increasingly reliant on technology in healthcare, we must address the emerging challenges that arise in parallel. “For the safety of patients, it is critical to ensure that the data, devices and systems that uphold our NHS and therefore our nation’s health are secure.” Special Report: 

Although the numbers of computers using Windows XP make up just 0.16% of the NHS IT estate (a decrease from 4.7% in 2017), Jo Platt claims it reflects the lack of resources the government is investing into updating cybersecurity systems. A 2017 report by the National Audit Office directly connected the use of Windows XP with increased cyber weakness. Indeed, Microsoft halted support of the system in 2014. Consequences of cyber-attacks include doctors not being able to view patients’ test results or scans, hackers having access to personal information or even tampering with medical records.

THE LARGER TREND

Platt’s warning followed the report presented by Lord Darzi (co-director of the Institute of Global Health Innovation) to the House of Lords calling for drastic improvements in NHS cybersecurity. He asked for the hiring of more cybersecurity experts into IT teams, integrating “fire-breaks” into networks allowing specific systems to be isolated and having clearer information and advice available on cybersecurity issues. Since the spread of the WannaCry virus produced serious disorders in NHS organisations in 2017 and cost the NHS an estimated £92m, awareness of cybersecurity has increased and the government has pledged that the NHS would update all its devices by January 2020.  

ON THE RECORD

Jo Platt emphasised that, “The Government is seriously lacking the leadership, strategy and co-ordination we need across the public sector to keep us and our data safe and secure. How many more warnings will it take before they listen and take action?”

Lord Darzi, co-director of IGHI, noted, “We are in the midst of a technological revolution that is transforming the way we deliver and receive care. But as we become increasingly reliant on technology in healthcare, we must address the emerging challenges that arise in parallel.

“For the safety of patients, it is critical to ensure that the data, devices and systems that uphold our NHS and therefore our nation’s health are secure.”

Special Report: 
]]>
Yale, Mayo Clinic to use biometric data from wearables to improve drug development for heart failure http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/yale-mayo-clinic-use-biometric-data-wearables-reducing-drug-development-times http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/yale-mayo-clinic-use-biometric-data-wearables-reducing-drug-development-times Wed, 17 Jul 2019 09:54:22 CDT at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com Researchers are working with digital therapeutics specialist Biofourmis, using machine learning technology and the Apple Watch to analyze dozens of physiology biomarkers. NHSX to manage commercial deals for patient data, MedTech Europe calls for 'an interoperable data ecosystem for digital health' and more news briefs http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/europe/nhsx-manage-commercial-deals-patient-data-medtech-europe-calls-interoperable-data http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/europe/nhsx-manage-commercial-deals-patient-data-medtech-europe-calls-interoperable-data Wed, 17 Jul 2019 04:27:52 CDT at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com Also: French academic hospital CHRU de Nancy announces 10-year enterprise informatics agreement with Royal Philips, former NHS England director Sir Bruce Keogh joins messaging app firm and others.  NHSX to manage commercial deals for patient data, MedTech Europe calls for 'an interoperable data ecosystem for digital health' and more news briefs http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/europe/nhsx-manage-commercial-deals-patient-data-medtech-europe-calls-interoperable-data http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/europe/nhsx-manage-commercial-deals-patient-data-medtech-europe-calls-interoperable-data Wed, 17 Jul 2019 04:27:52 CDT dyogendra at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy NHSX. New tech body NHSX will host a "national centre of expertise" to manage the sharing of patient data with industry, according to new guidance released by Department of Health and Social Care this week. The centre will identify opportunities for “agreements that support data-driven research and innovation” and provide commercial and legal advice to trusts which want to share data. It will also establish guiding principles and a framework to help the NHS realise benefits for patients and the public where the NHS shares data with researchers. The guidance bans NHS organisations entering into agreements which grant one organisation exclusive right of access to or use of raw NHS patient or operational data. Guiding principles include not undermining the ability to share NHS patient data at a national level and ensuring transparency. NHSX will begin recruitment for a head of the centre and other key personnel in the coming months to enable the centre to commence operations as soon as possible this year. ... Electronic Health Records. Industry association, MedTech Europe has called for an interoperable data ecosystem for digital health. In a paper released this week, the trade body endorses the European Commission‘s Electronic Health Record (EHR) Exchange Format published in February and argues that lack of interoperability is the one of the most persistent barriers to the deployment of digital health technology services. It also asks for more public investment in digital health infrastructures, including EHRs and requests the EU to tie cohesion and other funds for digital health to adherence to these standards. “With this initiative we contribute to a more widespread and accelerated digital health deployment in Europe,” says Serge Bernasconi, CEO of MedTech Europe.  “Patients will benefit from better interoperability of medical technologies through better quality of care and improved outcomes.” The call for action specifically references specifications and profiles released by Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM), Health Level 7 (HL7), and Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE). ... Informatics agreement. French academic hospital, Centre Hospitalier Régional Universitaire (CHRU) de Nancy and health tech giant Royal Philips have made a 10-year agreement to implement Philips IntelliSpace Enterprise Imaging Solution, including Illumeo with adaptive intelligence. This will enable the CHRU de Nancy to streamline complex medical image data management across its departments, a press release said. The hospital, based in the Grand Est region of France, is the first healthcare organisation in Europe to deploy Philips Illumeo in routine primary diagnostic use. “This new enterprise informatics agreement with Philips will enable us to improve productivity, enhance collaboration between clinicians, and ultimately improve health outcomes for our patients," said Jean-Christophe Calvo, chief information officer and head of the biomedical department at CHRU de Nancy. The solution also includes a data clinical manager, a clinical user interface and intelligent workflow and collaboration tools for radiologists. ... ‘Paperless’ hospital. The UK’s first new-build ‘paperless’ hospital Chase Farm Hospital (CFH), which opened in London last September, says it has improved clinical safety and dramatically reduced admin, releasing more time for patient care. The hospital, which is part of the Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust, was recently assessed by HIMSS as having achieved stage six in the Electronic Medical Record Adoption Model (EMRAM), making it one of only three hospitals in the UK to reach this level of ‘paperless’ maturity. CFH has a range of interoperable technology, including a nurse call system, co-designed by nurses with global solutions provider Ascom, and integrated with the company’s Myco smartphones, to connect them to patients and colleagues. “Crucially, the technology development work was done by clinicians instead of to clinicians,” said CFH chief executive and director of nursing, Natalie Forrest. “The nurse call system linked to smartphones ensures they can contact anyone including patients directly and know what’s going on in their clinical area, even when they are elsewhere.” ... Appointments. Former NHS England director, Sir Bruce Keogh has joined health tech firm Medic Creations in an advisory capacity. The company is the creator of Medic Bleep, a secure messaging app for health professionals, which is currently used at West Suffolk Foundation Trust. “Useful, timely and convenient communication underpins safe and effective clinical practice and healthcare delivery. That is why I am keen to support Medic Creations develop their mobile solution which aids and simplifies clinical communication,” Sir Bruce said in a statement. Former EMIS and Capita executive Kevin McDonnell has also joined the company as chair. Special Report: 

NHSX. New tech body NHSX will host a "national centre of expertise" to manage the sharing of patient data with industry, according to new guidance released by Department of Health and Social Care this week. The centre will identify opportunities for “agreements that support data-driven research and innovation” and provide commercial and legal advice to trusts which want to share data. It will also establish guiding principles and a framework to help the NHS realise benefits for patients and the public where the NHS shares data with researchers. The guidance bans NHS organisations entering into agreements which grant one organisation exclusive right of access to or use of raw NHS patient or operational data. Guiding principles include not undermining the ability to share NHS patient data at a national level and ensuring transparency. NHSX will begin recruitment for a head of the centre and other key personnel in the coming months to enable the centre to commence operations as soon as possible this year.

...

Electronic Health Records. Industry association, MedTech Europe has called for an interoperable data ecosystem for digital health. In a paper released this week, the trade body endorses the European Commission‘s Electronic Health Record (EHR) Exchange Format published in February and argues that lack of interoperability is the one of the most persistent barriers to the deployment of digital health technology services. It also asks for more public investment in digital health infrastructures, including EHRs and requests the EU to tie cohesion and other funds for digital health to adherence to these standards. “With this initiative we contribute to a more widespread and accelerated digital health deployment in Europe,” says Serge Bernasconi, CEO of MedTech Europe.  “Patients will benefit from better interoperability of medical technologies through better quality of care and improved outcomes.” The call for action specifically references specifications and profiles released by Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM), Health Level 7 (HL7), and Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE).

...

Informatics agreement. French academic hospital, Centre Hospitalier Régional Universitaire (CHRU) de Nancy and health tech giant Royal Philips have made a 10-year agreement to implement Philips IntelliSpace Enterprise Imaging Solution, including Illumeo with adaptive intelligence. This will enable the CHRU de Nancy to streamline complex medical image data management across its departments, a press release said. The hospital, based in the Grand Est region of France, is the first healthcare organisation in Europe to deploy Philips Illumeo in routine primary diagnostic use. “This new enterprise informatics agreement with Philips will enable us to improve productivity, enhance collaboration between clinicians, and ultimately improve health outcomes for our patients," said Jean-Christophe Calvo, chief information officer and head of the biomedical department at CHRU de Nancy. The solution also includes a data clinical manager, a clinical user interface and intelligent workflow and collaboration tools for radiologists.

...

‘Paperless’ hospital. The UK’s first new-build ‘paperless’ hospital Chase Farm Hospital (CFH), which opened in London last September, says it has improved clinical safety and dramatically reduced admin, releasing more time for patient care. The hospital, which is part of the Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust, was recently assessed by HIMSS as having achieved stage six in the Electronic Medical Record Adoption Model (EMRAM), making it one of only three hospitals in the UK to reach this level of ‘paperless’ maturity. CFH has a range of interoperable technology, including a nurse call system, co-designed by nurses with global solutions provider Ascom, and integrated with the company’s Myco smartphones, to connect them to patients and colleagues. “Crucially, the technology development work was done by clinicians instead of to clinicians,” said CFH chief executive and director of nursing, Natalie Forrest. “The nurse call system linked to smartphones ensures they can contact anyone including patients directly and know what’s going on in their clinical area, even when they are elsewhere.”

...

Appointments. Former NHS England director, Sir Bruce Keogh has joined health tech firm Medic Creations in an advisory capacity. The company is the creator of Medic Bleep, a secure messaging app for health professionals, which is currently used at West Suffolk Foundation Trust. “Useful, timely and convenient communication underpins safe and effective clinical practice and healthcare delivery. That is why I am keen to support Medic Creations develop their mobile solution which aids and simplifies clinical communication,” Sir Bruce said in a statement. Former EMIS and Capita executive Kevin McDonnell has also joined the company as chair.

Special Report: 
]]>
Safety concerns raised about software used to triage NHS 111 calls http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/europe/safety-concerns-raised-about-software-used-triage-nhs-111-calls http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/europe/safety-concerns-raised-about-software-used-triage-nhs-111-calls Wed, 17 Jul 2019 03:43:01 CDT at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com Coroners have called for action to prevent further fatalities linked to the NHS Pathways system following 11 patient deaths. Resident Guide app piloted at NZ’s Wellington Hospital http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/asia-pacific/resident-guide-app-piloted-nz-s-wellington-hospital http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/asia-pacific/resident-guide-app-piloted-nz-s-wellington-hospital Wed, 17 Jul 2019 01:53:29 CDT at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com Capital and Coast District Health Board (DHB) in New Zealand is piloting the Resident Guide app for onboarding junior doctors. The six-month pilot begins in mid-August and involves all resident medical officers (RMOs) at Wellington Hospital. Persistent HIV in central nervous system linked to cognitive impairment http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/persistent-hiv-central-nervous-system-linked-cognitive-impairment http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/persistent-hiv-central-nervous-system-linked-cognitive-impairment Tue, 16 Jul 2019 17:30:00 CDT NIH News Release Study participants were long-term HIV survivors who had infections controlled with ART for an average of nine years. ]]> SPH Analytics, SA Ignite to merge, boosting their pop health, MIPS offerings http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/sph-analytics-sa-ignite-merge-boosting-their-pop-health-mips-offerings http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/sph-analytics-sa-ignite-merge-boosting-their-pop-health-mips-offerings Tue, 16 Jul 2019 14:58:28 CDT at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com Population health management vendor SPH Analytics is merging with SA Ignite, which develops tools to help providers optimize their performance scores for the Merit-Based Incentive Payment System. Financial terms of the merger were not disclosed. Massachusetts to fund pilots expanding digital training for entry-level healthcare workers http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/massachusetts-fund-pilots-expanding-digital-training-entry-level-healthcare-workers http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/massachusetts-fund-pilots-expanding-digital-training-entry-level-healthcare-workers Tue, 16 Jul 2019 10:42:24 CDT mmiliard at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy Commonwealth Corporation, a workforce development agency that works to boost the skills of Massachusetts young adults with investments and partnerships, has released new funding to create new pilots to expand training for entry-level healthcare workers. WHY IT MATTERS The money for the pilots comes after Massachusetts' Commission on Digital Innovation and Lifelong Learning issued a report and recommendations to Gov. Charlie Baker, making the case that "healthcare, information technology and advanced manufacturing are among the most vital employment sectors for Massachusetts’ future prosperity" and "should be important focal points of any meaningful effort to align lifelong learning opportunities with employer needs." Three partnerships will get as much as $200,000 each via two-year grants to help develop and new digital or hybrid competency-based training programs for entry-level healthcare workers. The money will support an initial Program Design phase and subsequent implementation, including tuition for a first cohort of students. THE LARGER TREND Despite being a world leader in the healthcare and technology industries, Massachusetts is still home to thousands of employees in entry- and mid-level healthcare jobs – home health aides, certified nursing assistants, direct care workers and others – who don't have sufficient access to education and skill-building opportunities, the Commonwealth Corporation noted. Meanwhile, many employers in healthcare and beyond are grappling with worker shortages that are hindering their ability to deliver high-quality care. The goal of this new initiative is to help upskill employees such as those with digital training programs, accomplishing the dual goal of boosting economic opportunity for workers while addressing healthcare's workforce shortages. ON THE RECORD Commonwealth Corporation illustrated the kind of worker who might benefit from these programs by describing an entry-level healthcare worker named Carla. "A single mother with a high school diploma who immigrated to the United States eight years ago, her wages are now $14 an hour, making it a struggle for her to support her family even when she works more than 40 hours a week. Despite these challenges, Carla has consistently demonstrated passion for her work, earning praise from both her patients and employer, who cite her caring approach, diligence and interest in continuing to improve her practice. "Carla would like to advance professionally, but she can’t figure out how to participate in the required training. She needs to continue to work as the sole caretaker of her two youngest children and she shares her car with her 19-year-old daughter, who attends a community college and works evenings. Carla’s circumstances make returning to the classroom an unrealistic – and unaffordable – option. "With the rising demand for community-based care, Carla’s employer also faces growing challenges filling open positions. The company wishes to build a career advancement ladder to develop the skills of staff like Carla and other promising colleagues, but it lacks the knowledge and capacity to provide in-house training. And low margins for reimbursable time make it nearly impossible to schedule sufficient training time during the work day." The hope with this new funding is to create new opportunities for employees and employers alike, and better position Massachusetts' workforce for the future of digital health. Focus on Workforce Development In July, we'll speak to experts about how they're managing their workforces – not just clinicians, but IT departments, data scientists, care managers, back office staff and others. Twitter: @MikeMiliardHITN Email the writer: mike.miliard@himssmedia.com Healthcare IT News is a publication of HIMSS Media. Special Report: 

Commonwealth Corporation, a workforce development agency that works to boost the skills of Massachusetts young adults with investments and partnerships, has released new funding to create new pilots to expand training for entry-level healthcare workers.

WHY IT MATTERS
The money for the pilots comes after Massachusetts' Commission on Digital Innovation and Lifelong Learning issued a report and recommendations to Gov. Charlie Baker, making the case that "healthcare, information technology and advanced manufacturing are among the most vital employment sectors for Massachusetts’ future prosperity" and "should be important focal points of any meaningful effort to align lifelong learning opportunities with employer needs."

Three partnerships will get as much as $200,000 each via two-year grants to help develop and new digital or hybrid competency-based training programs for entry-level healthcare workers. The money will support an initial Program Design phase and subsequent implementation, including tuition for a first cohort of students.

THE LARGER TREND
Despite being a world leader in the healthcare and technology industries, Massachusetts is still home to thousands of employees in entry- and mid-level healthcare jobs – home health aides, certified nursing assistants, direct care workers and others – who don't have sufficient access to education and skill-building opportunities, the Commonwealth Corporation noted.

Meanwhile, many employers in healthcare and beyond are grappling with worker shortages that are hindering their ability to deliver high-quality care.

The goal of this new initiative is to help upskill employees such as those with digital training programs, accomplishing the dual goal of boosting economic opportunity for workers while addressing healthcare's workforce shortages.

ON THE RECORD
Commonwealth Corporation illustrated the kind of worker who might benefit from these programs by describing an entry-level healthcare worker named Carla.

"A single mother with a high school diploma who immigrated to the United States eight years ago, her wages are now $14 an hour, making it a struggle for her to support her family even when she works more than 40 hours a week. Despite these challenges, Carla has consistently demonstrated passion for her work, earning praise from both her patients and employer, who cite her caring approach, diligence and interest in continuing to improve her practice.

"Carla would like to advance professionally, but she can’t figure out how to participate in the required training. She needs to continue to work as the sole caretaker of her two youngest children and she shares her car with her 19-year-old daughter, who attends a community college and works evenings. Carla’s circumstances make returning to the classroom an unrealistic – and unaffordable – option.

"With the rising demand for community-based care, Carla’s employer also faces growing challenges filling open positions. The company wishes to build a career advancement ladder to develop the skills of staff like Carla and other promising colleagues, but it lacks the knowledge and capacity to provide in-house training. And low margins for reimbursable time make it nearly impossible to schedule sufficient training time during the work day."

The hope with this new funding is to create new opportunities for employees and employers alike, and better position Massachusetts' workforce for the future of digital health.

Focus on Workforce Development

In July, we'll speak to experts about how they're managing their workforces – not just clinicians, but IT departments, data scientists, care managers, back office staff and others.

Twitter: @MikeMiliardHITN
Email the writer: mike.miliard@himssmedia.com

Healthcare IT News is a publication of HIMSS Media.

Special Report: 
]]>
Extinct human species likely breast fed for up to a year after birth http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/extinct-human-species-likely-breast-fed-year-after-birth http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/extinct-human-species-likely-breast-fed-year-after-birth Mon, 15 Jul 2019 15:00:00 CDT NIH News Release NIH-funded findings may inform strategies for breast feeding in modern populations. ]]> NIH and partners to launch HIV vaccine efficacy trial in the Americas and Europe http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-partners-launch-hiv-vaccine-efficacy-trial-americas-europe http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-partners-launch-hiv-vaccine-efficacy-trial-americas-europe Mon, 15 Jul 2019 14:45:00 CDT NIH News Release Study will enroll men who have sex with men and transgender people; complementary study in women is ongoing. ]]> Surescripts files motion to dismiss FTC antitrust charge http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/surescripts-files-motion-dismiss-ftc-antitrust-charge http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/surescripts-files-motion-dismiss-ftc-antitrust-charge Mon, 15 Jul 2019 11:56:26 CDT mmiliard at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy Surescripts has moved to dismiss the Federal Trade Commission's charge from earlier this year that it holds an illegal monopoly on the e-prescribing market. WHY IT MATTERS This past April, the FTC alleged that Surescripts "intentionally set out to keep e-prescription routing and eligibility customers on both sides of each market from using additional platforms (a practice known as multihoming) using anticompetitive exclusivity agreements, threats, and other exclusionary tactics." FTC said its suit aims to counter that outsized influence and competition in the marketplace and to provide "monetary redress to consumers." But in filing its motion to dismiss this past Friday, Surescripts countered that the agency's charge should be tossed out, since it rests upon a several factual misreadings. For example, FTC points to Surescripts' contracts with Epic as an example of a loyalty provision, but the company asserts that its contract with the EHR vendors doesn't an exclusivity requirement. Moreover, it says the FTC is incorrect when it claims that nearly all of Surescripts' contracts with Epic customers also contain such requirements. FTC also says the e-prescribing vendor's contracts have a penalty provision it claims would discourage EHR companies from using multiple networks or switching away from Surescripts, requiring that those vendors repay loyalty incentives that they'd previously earned. But Surescripts claims there is no such requirement for EHR vendors to return incentive payments earned following a notice of termination, and says and such companies are free terminate agreements with just six months' notice. More generally, Surescripts counters that FTC misrepresents the dollars and cents realities of the e-prescribing market, making what it says is a theoretical claim that drug prices could have fallen by more than the 70% Surescripts managed to achieve. And it says the regulatory agency can't support its claim that Surescripts’ alleged market monopoly led to lower quality and reduced innovation. In its motion to dismiss, Surescripts lists several other antitrust case precedents that show, it says, that FTC is seeking to stretch the boundaries of its regulatory mandate. THE LARGER TREND For its part, FTC has said its case against Surescripts was just part of its larger ongoing efforts to end anti-competitive practices that put consumers at a disadvantage and raise the cost of care. "Surescripts’ illegal contracts denied customers and, ultimately, patients, the benefits of competition – including lower prices, increased output, thriving innovation, higher quality, and more customer choice," said FTC Bureau of Competition Director Bruce Hoffman in April. "Through this litigation, we hope to eliminate the anticompetitive conduct, open the relevant markets to competition, and redress the harm that Surescripts’s conduct has caused." ON THE RECORD “We continue to be disappointed at the allegations made by the Federal Trade Commission," Surescripts CEO Tom Skelton said in a statement. "We wholeheartedly share the FTC’s focus on lowering healthcare costs, and we have achieved significant reductions with e-prescribing for many years. However, the FTC’s complaint makes significant factual errors about Surescripts’ business and mischaracterizes the economic realities of the e-prescribing market. "It is important to highlight that while the cost of American healthcare overall continues to rise, Surescripts has reduced the cost of e-prescribing by 70% since 2009, a goal we will continue to focus on as a critical part of our business," he added. "There is no question that e-prescribing has brought enormous value to patients and clinicians alike through innovations in accuracy, safety and convenience." Twitter: @MikeMiliardHITN Email the writer: mike.miliard@himssmedia.com Healthcare IT News is a publication of HIMSS Media. Special Report: 

Surescripts has moved to dismiss the Federal Trade Commission's charge from earlier this year that it holds an illegal monopoly on the e-prescribing market.

WHY IT MATTERS
This past April, the FTC alleged that Surescripts "intentionally set out to keep e-prescription routing and eligibility customers on both sides of each market from using additional platforms (a practice known as multihoming) using anticompetitive exclusivity agreements, threats, and other exclusionary tactics."

FTC said its suit aims to counter that outsized influence and competition in the marketplace and to provide "monetary redress to consumers."

But in filing its motion to dismiss this past Friday, Surescripts countered that the agency's charge should be tossed out, since it rests upon a several factual misreadings.

For example, FTC points to Surescripts' contracts with Epic as an example of a loyalty provision, but the company asserts that its contract with the EHR vendors doesn't an exclusivity requirement. Moreover, it says the FTC is incorrect when it claims that nearly all of Surescripts' contracts with Epic customers also contain such requirements.

FTC also says the e-prescribing vendor's contracts have a penalty provision it claims would discourage EHR companies from using multiple networks or switching away from Surescripts, requiring that those vendors repay loyalty incentives that they'd previously earned. But Surescripts claims there is no such requirement for EHR vendors to return incentive payments earned following a notice of termination, and says and such companies are free terminate agreements with just six months' notice.

More generally, Surescripts counters that FTC misrepresents the dollars and cents realities of the e-prescribing market, making what it says is a theoretical claim that drug prices could have fallen by more than the 70% Surescripts managed to achieve. And it says the regulatory agency can't support its claim that Surescripts’ alleged market monopoly led to lower quality and reduced innovation.

In its motion to dismiss, Surescripts lists several other antitrust case precedents that show, it says, that FTC is seeking to stretch the boundaries of its regulatory mandate.

THE LARGER TREND
For its part, FTC has said its case against Surescripts was just part of its larger ongoing efforts to end anti-competitive practices that put consumers at a disadvantage and raise the cost of care.

"Surescripts’ illegal contracts denied customers and, ultimately, patients, the benefits of competition – including lower prices, increased output, thriving innovation, higher quality, and more customer choice," said FTC Bureau of Competition Director Bruce Hoffman in April. "Through this litigation, we hope to eliminate the anticompetitive conduct, open the relevant markets to competition, and redress the harm that Surescripts’s conduct has caused."

ON THE RECORD
“We continue to be disappointed at the allegations made by the Federal Trade Commission," Surescripts CEO Tom Skelton said in a statement. "We wholeheartedly share the FTC’s focus on lowering healthcare costs, and we have achieved significant reductions with e-prescribing for many years. However, the FTC’s complaint makes significant factual errors about Surescripts’ business and mischaracterizes the economic realities of the e-prescribing market.

"It is important to highlight that while the cost of American healthcare overall continues to rise, Surescripts has reduced the cost of e-prescribing by 70% since 2009, a goal we will continue to focus on as a critical part of our business," he added. "There is no question that e-prescribing has brought enormous value to patients and clinicians alike through innovations in accuracy, safety and convenience."

Twitter: @MikeMiliardHITN
Email the writer: mike.miliard@himssmedia.com

Healthcare IT News is a publication of HIMSS Media.

Special Report: 
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How Finland is benefiting from integrated healthcare data http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/video/europe/how-finland-benefiting-integrated-healthcare-data http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/video/europe/how-finland-benefiting-integrated-healthcare-data Mon, 15 Jul 2019 07:53:48 CDT rickdagley at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy Primary topic: Connected HealthDisable Auto Tagging: Short Headline: How Finland is benefiting from integrated healthcare dataFeatured Decision Content: Region Tag: Europe/UK
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How Finland is benefiting from integrated healthcare data
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Moderate calorie restriction in young and middle-aged adults significantly reduces heart and metabolic risk factors independent of weight loss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/moderate-calorie-restriction-young-middle-aged-adults-significantly-reduces-heart-metabolic-risk-factors-independent-weight-loss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/moderate-calorie-restriction-young-middle-aged-adults-significantly-reduces-heart-metabolic-risk-factors-independent-weight-loss Fri, 12 Jul 2019 13:30:00 CDT NIH News Release Participants saw improvement in waist circumference, blood pressure, HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, insulin sensitivity and fasting glucose. ]]> Value-based healthcare – what it means for Thailand http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/asia-pacific/value-based-healthcare-what-it-means-thailand http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/asia-pacific/value-based-healthcare-what-it-means-thailand Fri, 12 Jul 2019 00:51:29 CDT deankoh at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy Thailand’s population is ageing rapidly with almost half of its electorate above 50 years old by 2025. Healthcare costs are rising and it is not tenable in the long-run to keep building hospitals. One possible consideration for the country is the shift towards value-based healthcare (VBHC), which is about improving healthcare outcomes at lower cost. It focuses on what patients value and allocates resources according to the health outcomes delivered by the system, rather the traditional model of a volume or visit-based healthcare system. While VBHC sounds promising, the reality is that it is challenging to achieve as transforming a health system that is truly patient-centred and outcome based requires a lot of work. According to an article by the World Economic Forum, the transformation to a value-based health system requires:  - Sufficient technical expertise about VBHC to design and implement its core features. - Leaders committed to trying ideas and willing to accept the risks involved. - Cooperation among different organisations working together to improve outcomes for patients. The same article offers four key lessons for a successful switch to VBHC. Firstly, it is to focus on outcomes that matter to patients, rather than merely focusing on processes or costs. In the context of Thailand, this could mean bringing care to people especially in rural areas in which healthcare is not easily accessible. In that regard, Thailand has begun development of its telemedicine programme at 32 hospitals located in rural areas in eight provinces since March this year. Telemedicine services will be offered by the initial 32 hospitals as soon as by the fourth quarter of 2019. Another key lesson for a successful switch to VBHC is to engage partners from across the whole health system. In order to achieve meaningful system-wide change, transformation efforts have to include organisations from across the entire system, including the private sector. The unique advantage that Thailand has is its advanced development of the private healthcare sector, given the country’s reputation as a regional medical tourism hub. However, the challenge lies in how government institutions such as the Ministry of Public Health (MOPH) can meaningfully engage the private healthcare sector in moving towards VBHC. Next, stakeholders need to acknowledge that systems change is going to be hard, and they need to adopt a long-term perspective rather than looking only for “quick wins” or easy answers. eHealth is one of the tools that could be used towards achieving VBHC, and the MOPH has a long-term strategy to drive the growth and development of eHealth from 2017-2026. At its core, the aim is to develop a capable and interoperable health information system as well as digital health technologies to bring about value and improved standards of care. The last lesson is to take a problem-driven approach. In healthcare, it is often easy to ‘cut and paste’ solutions from other health systems but sometimes the answers or successful models may lie within. Telemedicine policies, for example, are still being studied in Thailand and the government is looking into more investments and getting the timing right to provide on-demand digital care to locals, expats and tourists, according to an article by Healthcare Asia.  With the theme of “Empowering Value Creation”, the upcoming HIMSS AsiaPac19 conference will be held in Bangkok, Thailand from October 7 to October 10 2019, featuring five main tracks: (i) Sustainability and growth (ii) Patient experience (iii) Unlocking the value of AI (iv) Value-based care (v) Health 2.0 Learn more about the HIMSS AsiaPac19 event here and those who are interested to speak or present at the event can sign up here.  Special Report: 

Thailand’s population is ageing rapidly with almost half of its electorate above 50 years old by 2025. Healthcare costs are rising and it is not tenable in the long-run to keep building hospitals. One possible consideration for the country is the shift towards value-based healthcare (VBHC), which is about improving healthcare outcomes at lower cost. It focuses on what patients value and allocates resources according to the health outcomes delivered by the system, rather the traditional model of a volume or visit-based healthcare system.

While VBHC sounds promising, the reality is that it is challenging to achieve as transforming a health system that is truly patient-centred and outcome based requires a lot of work. According to an article by the World Economic Forum, the transformation to a value-based health system requires: 
- Sufficient technical expertise about VBHC to design and implement its core features.
- Leaders committed to trying ideas and willing to accept the risks involved.
- Cooperation among different organisations working together to improve outcomes for patients.

The same article offers four key lessons for a successful switch to VBHC. Firstly, it is to focus on outcomes that matter to patients, rather than merely focusing on processes or costs. In the context of Thailand, this could mean bringing care to people especially in rural areas in which healthcare is not easily accessible. In that regard, Thailand has begun development of its telemedicine programme at 32 hospitals located in rural areas in eight provinces since March this year. Telemedicine services will be offered by the initial 32 hospitals as soon as by the fourth quarter of 2019.

Another key lesson for a successful switch to VBHC is to engage partners from across the whole health system. In order to achieve meaningful system-wide change, transformation efforts have to include organisations from across the entire system, including the private sector. The unique advantage that Thailand has is its advanced development of the private healthcare sector, given the country’s reputation as a regional medical tourism hub. However, the challenge lies in how government institutions such as the Ministry of Public Health (MOPH) can meaningfully engage the private healthcare sector in moving towards VBHC.

Next, stakeholders need to acknowledge that systems change is going to be hard, and they need to adopt a long-term perspective rather than looking only for “quick wins” or easy answers. eHealth is one of the tools that could be used towards achieving VBHC, and the MOPH has a long-term strategy to drive the growth and development of eHealth from 2017-2026. At its core, the aim is to develop a capable and interoperable health information system as well as digital health technologies to bring about value and improved standards of care.

The last lesson is to take a problem-driven approach. In healthcare, it is often easy to ‘cut and paste’ solutions from other health systems but sometimes the answers or successful models may lie within. Telemedicine policies, for example, are still being studied in Thailand and the government is looking into more investments and getting the timing right to provide on-demand digital care to locals, expats and tourists, according to an article by Healthcare Asia. 

With the theme of “Empowering Value Creation”, the upcoming HIMSS AsiaPac19 conference will be held in Bangkok, Thailand from October 7 to October 10 2019, featuring five main tracks:
(i) Sustainability and growth
(ii) Patient experience
(iii) Unlocking the value of AI
(iv) Value-based care
(v) Health 2.0

Learn more about the HIMSS AsiaPac19 event here and those who are interested to speak or present at the event can sign up here

Special Report: 
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NIH scientists identify spasm in women with endometriosis-associated chronic pelvic pain http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-scientists-identify-spasm-women-endometriosis-associated-chronic-pelvic-pain http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-scientists-identify-spasm-women-endometriosis-associated-chronic-pelvic-pain Thu, 11 Jul 2019 13:00:00 CDT NIH News Release Small study suggests botulinum toxin may be potential treatment. ]]> HHS summit to tackle quality improvement across programs http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/hhs-summit-tackle-quality-improvement-across-programs http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/hhs-summit-tackle-quality-improvement-across-programs Wed, 10 Jul 2019 12:52:57 CDT mmiliard at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services is putting together a Quality Summit, meant to explore ways the many healthcare initiatives put forth by HHS can be "evaluated, adapted, and ultimately streamlined" boost value-based care for U.S. patients. WHY IT MATTERS Deputy Secretary Eric Hargan announced the summit this week and is seeking to cast a wide net for attendees from all corners of the industry – HHS is accepting nominations for participants for the rest of this month. HHS quality programs – administered by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, the Centers for Disease Control, Health Resources and Services Administration, Indian Health Service and others – have often evolved over the past two decades, gaining more and more additional measures as they do. But there hasn't been a "systemic objective external review" of their requirements and implementation since they were created, according to the department. So with the Quality Summit, HHS seeks to review them all to make sure their optimally serving its goals of quality improvement and value-based care. The Summit will be chaired by Hargan and patient safety expert Dr. Peter Pronovost, chief clinical transformation officer at University Hospitals. THE LARGER TREND This past month, President Donald Trump signed an executive order, Improving Price and Quality Transparency in American Healthcare to Put Patients First, that directed federal agencies to create a Health Quality Roadmap to boost reporting on data and quality measures across federal health programs. With the Quality Summit, HHS is taking first steps toward developing that roadmap, with the help of government policymakers and 15 healthcare industry leaders from the private sector. Participants will look for ways to modernize HHS’s quality programs, with an eye toward patient-centered approaches, fostering competition, and improving access to care. They'll also seek to reduce regulatory burden by identifying extraneous or duplicative measure requirements that hinder the delivery of high-quality care. ON THE RECORD "Over the last decade we have seen efforts by HHS to incentivize the provision of quality care, only to be met with limited success," said Hargan in a statement. "This is in part because patients have not been empowered with meaningful or actionable information to inform their decision making." Meanwhile, "important quality programs across the department have remained uncoordinated among the various agencies and inconsistent in their demands on healthcare providers," he said. "We believe the Quality Summit will not only strengthen the protections these programs afford patients, but also improve value by reducing costs and onerous requirements that are placed on providers and ultimately stand between patients and the high quality care they deserve.” "Twenty years ago, the industry embarked on a paradigm shift to bring medical error and patient safety to the forefront, which resulted in a cultural transformation that medical harm was no longer inevitable, but preventable," added Pronovost. "Today, it’s time that we revisit this discussion about how to provide the high-value care patients deserve, providers desire, and the public demands." Twitter: @MikeMiliardHITN Email the writer: mike.miliard@himssmedia.com Healthcare IT News is a publication of HIMSS Media. Special Report: 

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services is putting together a Quality Summit, meant to explore ways the many healthcare initiatives put forth by HHS can be "evaluated, adapted, and ultimately streamlined" boost value-based care for U.S. patients.

WHY IT MATTERS
Deputy Secretary Eric Hargan announced the summit this week and is seeking to cast a wide net for attendees from all corners of the industry – HHS is accepting nominations for participants for the rest of this month.

HHS quality programs – administered by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, the Centers for Disease Control, Health Resources and Services Administration, Indian Health Service and others – have often evolved over the past two decades, gaining more and more additional measures as they do.

But there hasn't been a "systemic objective external review" of their requirements and implementation since they were created, according to the department. So with the Quality Summit, HHS seeks to review them all to make sure their optimally serving its goals of quality improvement and value-based care.

The Summit will be chaired by Hargan and patient safety expert Dr. Peter Pronovost, chief clinical transformation officer at University Hospitals.

THE LARGER TREND
This past month, President Donald Trump signed an executive order, Improving Price and Quality Transparency in American Healthcare to Put Patients First, that directed federal agencies to create a Health Quality Roadmap to boost reporting on data and quality measures across federal health programs.

With the Quality Summit, HHS is taking first steps toward developing that roadmap, with the help of government policymakers and 15 healthcare industry leaders from the private sector. Participants will look for ways to modernize HHS’s quality programs, with an eye toward patient-centered approaches, fostering competition, and improving access to care.

They'll also seek to reduce regulatory burden by identifying extraneous or duplicative measure requirements that hinder the delivery of high-quality care.

ON THE RECORD
"Over the last decade we have seen efforts by HHS to incentivize the provision of quality care, only to be met with limited success," said Hargan in a statement. "This is in part because patients have not been empowered with meaningful or actionable information to inform their decision making."

Meanwhile, "important quality programs across the department have remained uncoordinated among the various agencies and inconsistent in their demands on healthcare providers," he said. "We believe the Quality Summit will not only strengthen the protections these programs afford patients, but also improve value by reducing costs and onerous requirements that are placed on providers and ultimately stand between patients and the high quality care they deserve.”

"Twenty years ago, the industry embarked on a paradigm shift to bring medical error and patient safety to the forefront, which resulted in a cultural transformation that medical harm was no longer inevitable, but preventable," added Pronovost. "Today, it’s time that we revisit this discussion about how to provide the high-value care patients deserve, providers desire, and the public demands."

Twitter: @MikeMiliardHITN
Email the writer: mike.miliard@himssmedia.com

Healthcare IT News is a publication of HIMSS Media.

Special Report: 
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New NHS digital reporting system will allow safety concerns to be reported via mobile phones http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/europe/new-nhs-digital-reporting-system-will-allow-safety-concerns-be-reported-mobile-phones http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/europe/new-nhs-digital-reporting-system-will-allow-safety-concerns-be-reported-mobile-phones Wed, 10 Jul 2019 05:52:18 CDT lpostelnicu at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy A new national patient safety reporting system will allow staff, patients and families to report care incidents on their mobile phones. The system will replace the “outdated technology” currently being used to report incidents, according to the recently published NHS patient safety strategy. Since 2003, the National Reporting and Learning System (NRLS) has been the main system for reporting and reviewing patient safety incidents. The database receives around two million incidents a year and is used to develop NHS policy and guidance. But the outdated system will now be replaced by the Patient Safety Incident Management System (PSIMIS), which will use technology such as data-cleansing algorithms to protect patient anonymity and artificial intelligence (AI) to process incident data in new ways. WHY IT MATTERS According to the strategy document, the new system will use a “single simple portal” to make safety incident reporting “easier and more rewarding,” increasing insight from parts of the NHS, like primary care, that find it harder to report. Whereas the NRLS works primarily in hospitals, the new system is being designed to also be used in primary and community care settings. “You can do it from your mobile phone and it’s designed to support you to do what you need quickly and easily without needing loads of kit to support it,” said Lucie Musset, NHS patient safety lead for the new product. The system also aims to make safety data “more accessible and transparent” by offering a self-service portal to search, analysis and download data to support local learning and improvement. THE LARGER TREND NHS England and Improvement national director of patient safety, Dr Adrian Fowler, is leading the patient safety strategy to support the delivery of the NHS long-term plan. It aims to improve the safety of patients over the next decade, by helping staff to play an active role in spotting and stopping safety issues. ON THE RECORD Dr Fowler said: “The NHS is already a pioneer for safety – developing the world’s first and largest incident reporting system - but we want to go even further as part of our long-term plan.” Musset said: “The new system is not only about updating the technology, but it’s about creating something that fits with the kind of patient safety culture that we want to see now.” Amber Jabber, head of policy at NHS Providers, said: “It is right that NHS staff across all levels are given the training, expertise and resources needed to fully embed an effective safety culture and spot the risks of patient harm when they occur. Staff and trusts must also have the support and resource they require to adopt the digital solutions which will play a key role in delivering these aims.” Special Report: 

A new national patient safety reporting system will allow staff, patients and families to report care incidents on their mobile phones.

The system will replace the “outdated technology” currently being used to report incidents, according to the recently published NHS patient safety strategy.

Since 2003, the National Reporting and Learning System (NRLS) has been the main system for reporting and reviewing patient safety incidents. The database receives around two million incidents a year and is used to develop NHS policy and guidance.

But the outdated system will now be replaced by the Patient Safety Incident Management System (PSIMIS), which will use technology such as data-cleansing algorithms to protect patient anonymity and artificial intelligence (AI) to process incident data in new ways.

WHY IT MATTERS

According to the strategy document, the new system will use a “single simple portal” to make safety incident reporting “easier and more rewarding,” increasing insight from parts of the NHS, like primary care, that find it harder to report.

Whereas the NRLS works primarily in hospitals, the new system is being designed to also be used in primary and community care settings.

“You can do it from your mobile phone and it’s designed to support you to do what you need quickly and easily without needing loads of kit to support it,” said Lucie Musset, NHS patient safety lead for the new product.

The system also aims to make safety data “more accessible and transparent” by offering a self-service portal to search, analysis and download data to support local learning and improvement.

THE LARGER TREND

NHS England and Improvement national director of patient safety, Dr Adrian Fowler, is leading the patient safety strategy to support the delivery of the NHS long-term plan. It aims to improve the safety of patients over the next decade, by helping staff to play an active role in spotting and stopping safety issues.

ON THE RECORD

Dr Fowler said: “The NHS is already a pioneer for safety – developing the world’s first and largest incident reporting system - but we want to go even further as part of our long-term plan.”

Musset said: “The new system is not only about updating the technology, but it’s about creating something that fits with the kind of patient safety culture that we want to see now.”

Amber Jabber, head of policy at NHS Providers, said: “It is right that NHS staff across all levels are given the training, expertise and resources needed to fully embed an effective safety culture and spot the risks of patient harm when they occur. Staff and trusts must also have the support and resource they require to adopt the digital solutions which will play a key role in delivering these aims.”

Special Report: 
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Making patient-powered healthcare work http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/video/europe/making-patient-powered-healthcare-work http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/video/europe/making-patient-powered-healthcare-work Tue, 09 Jul 2019 08:15:23 CDT rickdagley at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy Primary topic: Patient EngagementDisable Auto Tagging: Short Headline: Making patient-powered healthcare workFeatured Decision Content: Region Tag: Europe/UKSponsor: Philips
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Making patient-powered healthcare work
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Rosy health and sickly green: color associations play robust role in reading faces http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/rosy-health-sickly-green-color-associations-play-robust-role-reading-faces http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/rosy-health-sickly-green-color-associations-play-robust-role-reading-faces Mon, 08 Jul 2019 13:15:00 CDT NIH News Release NIH study research uncovers specialized networks in the brain for processing face color. ]]> Jon White departs ONC, Steve Posnack to take over as Deputy National Coordinator http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/jon-white-departs-onc-steve-posnack-take-over-deputy-national-coordinator http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/jon-white-departs-onc-steve-posnack-take-over-deputy-national-coordinator Mon, 08 Jul 2019 12:19:52 CDT mmiliard at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy Deputy National Coordinator for Health IT Dr. Jon White is leaving the agency next month for a position at the Veterans Administration Salt Lake City Health Care System, where he'll be Associate Chief of Staff of Research. WHY IT MATTERS White has been at ONC for five years. Steve Posnack, who has spent more than 14 years at the agency – he's been there almost since its inception – will take over in White's role on August 19. In his current position, Posnack serves as executive director, focused on the ONC Health IT Certification Program and the standards and technology investments of ONC Tech Lab. During his tenure at ONC, White – who had previously served as director of the Division of Health IT at the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality – focused on major interoperability initiatives such as the Shared Nationwide Interoperability Roadmap and the information blocking rules that were recently put up for public comment. White also served as acting head of the agency in the months between the tenures of National Coordinators Dr. Vindell Washington and Dr. Donald Rucker. THE LARGER TREND In an interview with Healthcare IT News not long after becoming deputy national coordinator, White clearly saw the near future as a time of "rubber hitting the road" – and was practical minded about the value of EHRs as simple tools that enable bigger things. "Is the point to have a box on a desk? Or is the point to have people live longer, suffer less and have better value for their dollars?" said White. "The obvious answer is the latter. Meaningful use has definitely done its job as far as driving adoption. I think that has been a great success. I think that now the secret sauce is providers grappling with these tools and understanding them at a fundamental level. "My background is as a family doctor," he added. "When you do primary care you coordinate across a lot of different folks and coordinate across a lot of different problems. By and large, my stock in trade is information." As ONC interoperability efforts continue, Posnack and the rest of the agency will keep pushing forward on new approaches to data exchange, enabled by FHIR and open APIs and the info blocking rules he announced earlier this year. ON THE RECORD "Jon has provided exemplary executive leadership for all ONC programs and policies and championed ONC’s key priorities of advancing interoperability and reducing provider burden," said Rucker in an email sent to ONC staff. "He helped lead mission-critical activities, including the publication of high priority, nationally impactful regulations, the publication of the Shared Nationwide Interoperability Roadmap, a widely-publicized congressional report on information blocking, and ONC’s efforts in the precision medicine initiative. "Steve has become a central part of ONC’s leadership team during his 14-year tenure, including nine years as part of ONC’s policy offices and five years leading ONC’s technology offices," he added. "His unique experience and depth of knowledge will provide steady direction for our ONC team, continuity for our stakeholders, and vision for the work ahead of us. Steve will continue in his role as the Executive Director of the Office of Technology as we recruit for his replacement." Twitter: @MikeMiliardHITN Email the writer: mike.miliard@himssmedia.com Healthcare IT News is a publication of HIMSS Media. Special Report: 

Deputy National Coordinator for Health IT Dr. Jon White is leaving the agency next month for a position at the Veterans Administration Salt Lake City Health Care System, where he'll be Associate Chief of Staff of Research.

WHY IT MATTERS
White has been at ONC for five years. Steve Posnack, who has spent more than 14 years at the agency – he's been there almost since its inception – will take over in White's role on August 19. In his current position, Posnack serves as executive director, focused on the ONC Health IT Certification Program and the standards and technology investments of ONC Tech Lab.

During his tenure at ONC, White – who had previously served as director of the Division of Health IT at the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality – focused on major interoperability initiatives such as the Shared Nationwide Interoperability Roadmap and the information blocking rules that were recently put up for public comment.

White also served as acting head of the agency in the months between the tenures of National Coordinators Dr. Vindell Washington and Dr. Donald Rucker.

THE LARGER TREND
In an interview with Healthcare IT News not long after becoming deputy national coordinator, White clearly saw the near future as a time of "rubber hitting the road" – and was practical minded about the value of EHRs as simple tools that enable bigger things.

"Is the point to have a box on a desk? Or is the point to have people live longer, suffer less and have better value for their dollars?" said White. "The obvious answer is the latter. Meaningful use has definitely done its job as far as driving adoption. I think that has been a great success. I think that now the secret sauce is providers grappling with these tools and understanding them at a fundamental level.

"My background is as a family doctor," he added. "When you do primary care you coordinate across a lot of different folks and coordinate across a lot of different problems. By and large, my stock in trade is information."

As ONC interoperability efforts continue, Posnack and the rest of the agency will keep pushing forward on new approaches to data exchange, enabled by FHIR and open APIs and the info blocking rules he announced earlier this year.

ON THE RECORD
"Jon has provided exemplary executive leadership for all ONC programs and policies and championed ONC’s key priorities of advancing interoperability and reducing provider burden," said Rucker in an email sent to ONC staff. "He helped lead mission-critical activities, including the publication of high priority, nationally impactful regulations, the publication of the Shared Nationwide Interoperability Roadmap, a widely-publicized congressional report on information blocking, and ONC’s efforts in the precision medicine initiative.

"Steve has become a central part of ONC’s leadership team during his 14-year tenure, including nine years as part of ONC’s policy offices and five years leading ONC’s technology offices," he added. "His unique experience and depth of knowledge will provide steady direction for our ONC team, continuity for our stakeholders, and vision for the work ahead of us. Steve will continue in his role as the Executive Director of the Office of Technology as we recruit for his replacement."

Twitter: @MikeMiliardHITN
Email the writer: mike.miliard@himssmedia.com

Healthcare IT News is a publication of HIMSS Media.

Special Report: 
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Novel Method Identifies Patients at Risk for HIV Who May Benefit From Prevention Strategies http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/novel-method-identifies-patients-risk-hiv-who-may-benefit-prevention-strategies http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/novel-method-identifies-patients-risk-hiv-who-may-benefit-prevention-strategies Fri, 05 Jul 2019 22:30:00 CDT NIH News Release NIH-funded studies demonstrate the value of automated prediction algorithms that could be used to prevent new HIV infections. ]]> NIH scientists link genetics to risk of high blood pressure among blacks http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-scientists-link-genetics-risk-high-blood-pressure-among-blacks http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-scientists-link-genetics-risk-high-blood-pressure-among-blacks Wed, 03 Jul 2019 09:00:00 CDT NIH News Release Study team identified 17 variants in the ARMC5 gene that were associated with high blood pressure by analyzing genetic research databases that include those of African descent. ]]> NIH study finds long-term increased risk of cancer death following common treatment for hyperthyroidism http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-study-finds-long-term-increased-risk-cancer-death-following-common-treatment-hyperthyroidism http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-study-finds-long-term-increased-risk-cancer-death-following-common-treatment-hyperthyroidism Mon, 01 Jul 2019 19:00:00 CDT NIH News Release Research shows association between RAI treatment and solid cancer risks. ]]> Elevated blood pressure in first trimester increases risk for blood pressure disorder later in pregnancy http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/elevated-blood-pressure-first-trimester-increases-risk-blood-pressure-disorder-later-pregnancy http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/elevated-blood-pressure-first-trimester-increases-risk-blood-pressure-disorder-later-pregnancy Thu, 27 Jun 2019 13:30:00 CDT NIH News Release Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy include gestational high blood pressure and preeclampsia. ]]> Physicians should think twice about promoting medical credit cards to their patients http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/finance-experts-warn-medical-credit-cards?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/finance-experts-warn-medical-credit-cards?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Tue, 20 Feb 2018 10:15:20 CST Joanne Finnegan at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Consumers use credit cards to pay for everything (including the kitchen sink), and the latest trend has people using medical credit cards to pay for healthcare services. But financial experts are warning practices about the pitfalls of promoting so-called medical credit cards to their patients, says the Healthcare Financial Management Association. Trump administration issues proposed rule to expand short-term insurance plans http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/trump-administration-short-term-insurance-rule?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/trump-administration-short-term-insurance-rule?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Tue, 20 Feb 2018 09:56:31 CST Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare A proposed rule issued by three federal agencies on Tuesday would expand limits for short-term health insurance plans from three months to 12 months. CMS's Seema Verma dismissed concerns that the policy shift would destabilize the individual market by siphoning off healthy individuals, arguing the change will have "virtually no impact" on ACA premiums. Under Trump, HHS rolls back policies aimed at protecting LGBT rights http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/trump-hhs-lgbt-rights-alex-azar?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/trump-hhs-lgbt-rights-alex-azar?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Tue, 20 Feb 2018 09:31:52 CST Leslie Small at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Though President Donald Trump promised to support LGBT causes during the 2016 campaign, under his watch the Department of Health and Human Services had rolled back several initiatives aimed at protecting the rights of that population. New HHS Secretary Alex Azar could take the department in a different direction. Study: Community navigators can reduce the high cost of 'superusers' in hospital settings http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/patient-engagement/community-navigators-superusers-hospital-visits-decrease?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/patient-engagement/community-navigators-superusers-hospital-visits-decrease?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Tue, 20 Feb 2018 09:08:46 CST Paige Minemyer at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare "Superusers," those costly patients who utilize high levels of hospital care, are a significant burden on the healthcare system. But a new study suggests that pairing them with community navigators can reduce their use of hospital services. Researchers in Tennessee found that the intervention reduced their healthcare encounters by 39%. Patients lack information about imaging exams, study finds http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/patients-lack-information-imaging-exams-radiology-study-yale?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/patients-lack-information-imaging-exams-radiology-study-yale?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Sat, 17 Feb 2018 20:14:46 CST Joanne Finnegan at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Doctors can do a better job providing patients with information before they go for an imaging exam, a new study found. One in five patients shows up for an imaging exam without any information about the test they are about to undergo, according to the study published in Radiology. Most for-profit hospitals will benefit from U.S. tax overhaul, but 2 big-name providers stand to gain the most http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/most-for-profit-hospitals-will-benefit-from-us-tax-overhaul-but-two-big-name-providers?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/most-for-profit-hospitals-will-benefit-from-us-tax-overhaul-but-two-big-name-providers?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 16 Feb 2018 15:23:18 CST Ilene MacDonald at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Most for-profit hospitals stand to gain from the changes to the U.S. tax laws, according to a new Moody’s Investors Service report. But HCA Healthcare and Universal Health Service will be the biggest beneficiaries and could see their operating cash flows go up by 10% or more. North Carolina attorney general seeks more details on Atrium Health-UNC Health Care merger  http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/atrium-health-university-north-carolina-merger-ag-wants-details?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/atrium-health-university-north-carolina-merger-ag-wants-details?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 16 Feb 2018 15:12:13 CST Paige Minemyer at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare North Carolina's attorney general is asking Atrium Health and UNC Health Care to provide more information on their merger plans. AG Josh Stein said he intends to ensure that the planned merger doesn't increase patient costs. 5 medical conditions that cost more than $15K per hospital stay http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/5-medical-conditions-cost-more-than-15k-per-hospital-stay?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/5-medical-conditions-cost-more-than-15k-per-hospital-stay?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 16 Feb 2018 14:01:34 CST Ilene MacDonald at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Heart valve disorders lead the list of the most expensive medical conditions with the highest average cost per inpatient stay, according to an analysis by Business Insider based on 2016 data from Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project. Heart valve disorders, on average, cost $41,878 per stay, the analysis found. Anthem alters controversial ER coverage policies http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/anthem-er-coverage-policy-changes?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/anthem-er-coverage-policy-changes?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 16 Feb 2018 11:50:13 CST Leslie Small at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Seeking to address mounting concerns from providers and other stakeholders, Anthem has made changes to policies it previously rolled out that restrict coverage for emergency room visits. The insurer has implemented a series of “always pay” exceptions for certain circumstances, like when the patient received any kind of surgery or an MRI or CT scan. VA head Shulkin to reimburse disputed European travel expenses, but Dems call for hearing over controversy http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/healthcare/va-head-s-european-trip-drama-continues-shulkin-will-reimburse-disputed-expenses-but-won?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/healthcare/va-head-s-european-trip-drama-continues-shulkin-will-reimburse-disputed-expenses-but-won?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 16 Feb 2018 10:30:06 CST Ilene MacDonald at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Veterans Affairs Secretary David Shulkin, M.D., says he will reimburse travel expenses that were the subject of an internal investigation into a trip he took to Europe this summer, but that may not put an end to the controversy. One lawmaker has called for Shulkin’s resignation, and four Democrats have requested a hearing about the trip.