MedClimate Health News Daily http://medclimate.com/feed en-us Copyright MedClimate, Inc2019 NIH pairs cutting-edge neuroethics with ground-breaking neurotechnologies http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-pairs-cutting-edge-neuroethics-ground-breaking-neurotechnologies http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-pairs-cutting-edge-neuroethics-ground-breaking-neurotechnologies Fri, 18 Oct 2019 16:45:00 CDT NIH News Release NIH BRAIN Initiative collaboration looking at clinical research considerations. ]]> New NIH BRAIN Initiative awards accelerate neuroscience discoveries http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/new-nih-brain-initiative-awards-accelerate-neuroscience-discoveries http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/new-nih-brain-initiative-awards-accelerate-neuroscience-discoveries Fri, 18 Oct 2019 16:45:00 CDT NIH News Release Initiative equips researchers with the tools and insights necessary for studying a wide variety of brain disorders. ]]> NIH funds new All of Us Research Program genome center to test advanced sequencing tools http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-funds-new-all-us-research-program-genome-center-test-advanced-sequencing-tools http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-funds-new-all-us-research-program-genome-center-test-advanced-sequencing-tools Fri, 18 Oct 2019 16:30:00 CDT NIH News Release HudsonAlpha awarded $7 million to expand national health dataset with uncharted genetic variants. ]]> Candidate Ebola Vaccine Still Effective when Highly Diluted, Macaque Study Finds http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/candidate-ebola-vaccine-still-effective-when-highly-diluted-macaque-study-finds http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/candidate-ebola-vaccine-still-effective-when-highly-diluted-macaque-study-finds Fri, 18 Oct 2019 16:30:00 CDT NIH News Release Scientists Hope Findings Mean Vaccine Supplies Could Stretch Farther. ]]> Cerner acquires AbleVets, helping fine-tune its IT offerings for the federal space http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/cerner-acquires-ablevets-helping-fine-tune-its-it-offerings-federal-space http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/cerner-acquires-ablevets-helping-fine-tune-its-it-offerings-federal-space Fri, 18 Oct 2019 13:06:25 CDT at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com The consultancy, a Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned Small Business, has experience working with the DoD, VA and government healthcare clients and specializes in cybersecurity, agile engineering and more. Cerner acquires AbleVets, helping fine-tune its IT offerings for the federal space http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/cerner-acquires-ablevets-helping-fine-tune-its-it-offerings-federal-space http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/cerner-acquires-ablevets-helping-fine-tune-its-it-offerings-federal-space Fri, 18 Oct 2019 13:06:25 CDT mmiliard at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy Cerner announced Friday that it will acquire IT consulting firm AbleVets, making it a wholly owned subsidiary that can help advance Cerner's work with the U.S. Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs – and elsewhere across the federal sector. WHY IT MATTERS Cerner says the acquisition of the Washington, D.C.-based consultancy – which specializes in strategy for engineering, cybersecurity, cloud hosting and system development for civil and defense health agencies including the DoD, VA and HHS – will help it continue to scale up its offerings for the federal space, offering specific technical expertise for designing and implementing federal modernization projects. The deal, terms of which were not disclosed, is expected to be completed by the fourth quarter, the companies said. AbleVets was founded as a Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned Small Business by Dr. Wyatt Smith, who served as an oncologist in the Navy. Its 350 employees, many of whom are veterans themselves, specialize in the unique needs of federal health clients, helping them implement IT modernization efforts more quickly and efficiently at a lower cost. THE LARGER TREND Back in 2015, Healthcare IT News ran a feature story exploring the unique perspective and expertise that veterans can bring to public and private sector health technology clients, particularly in areas such as infrastructure and infosec. "There are a lot of vets that are getting out of the service now with tremendous training in either information security or cybersecurity that are going to be looking for jobs," said Mac McMillan, then CEO (and now CEO emeritus) of CynergisTek, who served in the Marines. "If I were a health system and I were looking for a good quality ISO with a lot to give, and a lot of discipline and a lot of motivation and know-how, I'd be hiring a vet." Cerner, meanwhile, even as it continues its twin EHR modernization projects at the DoD and VA, has had a busy few months. Among its recent news: a new cognitive platform in the works, a 10-year pop health deal with Geisinger, a new collaboration on price transparency and a major new partnership with Amazon Web Services. ON THE RECORD "AbleVets has been a trusted partner to Cerner and is providing critical support to our federal programs," said Travis Dalton, president of Cerner Government Services. "Integrating the team into our business is a natural next step of our relationship. We expect AbleVets’ technical expertise and execution in solving complex problems will accelerate Cerner’s success in providing integrated, seamless care for Veterans, Service members and their families." "I launched AbleVets to deliver health IT solutions that improve Veteran health," said Smith. "By working with Cerner over the past year, we’ve been able to make important strides in laying the groundwork on our shared mission to transform care for those who served our country. By combining AbleVets’ strategic and technical expertise in the federal space with Cerner’s global scale, technology and innovation, we can expand our collective reach, accelerate developments and make the greatest impact on improving outcomes across the care continuum." Twitter: @MikeMiliardHITN Email the writer: mike.miliard@himssmedia.com Healthcare IT News is a publication of HIMSS Media.

Cerner announced Friday that it will acquire IT consulting firm AbleVets, making it a wholly owned subsidiary that can help advance Cerner's work with the U.S. Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs – and elsewhere across the federal sector.

WHY IT MATTERS
Cerner says the acquisition of the Washington, D.C.-based consultancy – which specializes in strategy for engineering, cybersecurity, cloud hosting and system development for civil and defense health agencies including the DoD, VA and HHS – will help it continue to scale up its offerings for the federal space, offering specific technical expertise for designing and implementing federal modernization projects.

The deal, terms of which were not disclosed, is expected to be completed by the fourth quarter, the companies said.

AbleVets was founded as a Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned Small Business by Dr. Wyatt Smith, who served as an oncologist in the Navy. Its 350 employees, many of whom are veterans themselves, specialize in the unique needs of federal health clients, helping them implement IT modernization efforts more quickly and efficiently at a lower cost.

THE LARGER TREND
Back in 2015, Healthcare IT News ran a feature story exploring the unique perspective and expertise that veterans can bring to public and private sector health technology clients, particularly in areas such as infrastructure and infosec.

"There are a lot of vets that are getting out of the service now with tremendous training in either information security or cybersecurity that are going to be looking for jobs," said Mac McMillan, then CEO (and now CEO emeritus) of CynergisTek, who served in the Marines. "If I were a health system and I were looking for a good quality ISO with a lot to give, and a lot of discipline and a lot of motivation and know-how, I'd be hiring a vet."

Cerner, meanwhile, even as it continues its twin EHR modernization projects at the DoD and VA, has had a busy few months. Among its recent news: a new cognitive platform in the works, a 10-year pop health deal with Geisinger, a new collaboration on price transparency and a major new partnership with Amazon Web Services.

ON THE RECORD
"AbleVets has been a trusted partner to Cerner and is providing critical support to our federal programs," said Travis Dalton, president of Cerner Government Services. "Integrating the team into our business is a natural next step of our relationship. We expect AbleVets’ technical expertise and execution in solving complex problems will accelerate Cerner’s success in providing integrated, seamless care for Veterans, Service members and their families."

"I launched AbleVets to deliver health IT solutions that improve Veteran health," said Smith. "By working with Cerner over the past year, we’ve been able to make important strides in laying the groundwork on our shared mission to transform care for those who served our country. By combining AbleVets’ strategic and technical expertise in the federal space with Cerner’s global scale, technology and innovation, we can expand our collective reach, accelerate developments and make the greatest impact on improving outcomes across the care continuum."

Twitter: @MikeMiliardHITN
Email the writer: mike.miliard@himssmedia.com

Healthcare IT News is a publication of HIMSS Media.

]]>
ACO integrates decision support with its EHR to improve pop health efforts http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/aco-integrates-decision-support-its-ehr-improve-pop-health-efforts http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/aco-integrates-decision-support-its-ehr-improve-pop-health-efforts Fri, 18 Oct 2019 11:20:38 CDT at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com The decision support tool brings holistic data to the clinical team via predictive analytic modeling, while also automating all the data points to help clinicians make optimal interventions. Microsoft, Nuance Partner on ambient clinical intelligence for physicians http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/microsoft-nuance-partner-ambient-clinical-intelligence-physicians http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/microsoft-nuance-partner-ambient-clinical-intelligence-physicians Fri, 18 Oct 2019 10:34:47 CDT at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com The ACI platform, which the companies say can ease administrative burden by streamlining documentation, has been rolled out to some customers in beta and is planned to launch in early 2020 across several specialties. Google hires Karen DeSalvo as new chief health officer http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/google-hires-karen-desalvo-new-chief-health-officer http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/google-hires-karen-desalvo-new-chief-health-officer Fri, 18 Oct 2019 10:21:52 CDT at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com For its most recent big healthcare hire, Google has recruited former National Coordinator for Health IT Dr. Karen DeSalvo to serve as its first chief health officer. Google hires Karen DeSalvo as new chief health officer http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/google-hires-karen-desalvo-new-chief-health-officer http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/google-hires-karen-desalvo-new-chief-health-officer Fri, 18 Oct 2019 10:21:52 CDT mmiliard at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy For its most recent big healthcare hire, Google has recruited former National Coordinator for Health IT Dr. Karen DeSalvo to serve as its first chief health officer. WHY IT MATTERS The move, first reported by CNBC, is further evidence, as if more were needed, that the Mountain View, California-based technology titan is serious about its ambitions to disrupt the healthcare market. Earlier this month, Google parent company Alphabet hired former FDA Commissioner Dr. Robert Califf – who, like DeSalvo, served during the Obama administration – to be the new head of strategy and policy for Verily Life Sciences and Google Health. And about this time last year, Google tapped Dr. David Feinberg, who had served as CEO of world-class health system Geisinger, to help it develop and expand its healthcare strategy, organizing the various initiatives of Alphabet companies such as Verily, DeepMind and Google Cloud. DeSalvo will report to Feinberg and will be tasked, among other things, with offering advice and perspective about clinician experience, according to CNBC. THE LARGER TREND DeSalvo served as National Coordinator for Health Information Technology from 2014 to 2016 and U.S. Assistant Secretary for Health from 2014 to 2017. During her two-and-a-half year stint as ONC chief, she led a series of successful projects related to EHR certification for the meaningful use program, interoperability advancements, patient access initiatives and more. Since her time in the federal government, DeSalvo has kept her CV well-updated with a series of high-profile jobs. In late 2017, she joined the faculty at Dell Medical School at The University of Texas at Austin, with professorships in both the Department of Internal Medicine and in the Department of Population Health. In March 2018, she was elected president of the Society of General Internal Medicine. She also joined Leavitt Partners, the consulting firm founded by former HHS Secretary Michael Leavitt, as a senior advisor. A longtime leader in public policy, population health, social determinants and patient engagement, DeSalvo was commissioner of health for the city of New Orleans – where she helped to digitize the city's health IT infrastructure after Hurricane Katrina – before being appointed by President Obama to lead ONC. ON THE RECORD On Twitter, many of DeSalvo's health industry colleagues applauded the move: Hear hear! And congrats @Google - you got a good one. @KBDeSalvo weaves “bold” and “insight” in a way that has served the nation well. Looking forward to hearing what you’ll (both) do next! https://t.co/jhPybxm6jx — Jitin Asnaani (@jitin) October 18, 2019 the movement to open up more health data just got a massive shot in the arm! woot! congratulations @KBDeSalvo and to @dtfeinberg for building a great team! https://t.co/M3515KMYNL — Aneesh Chopra (@aneeshchopra) October 18, 2019 Great pick! Congrats @KBDeSalvo @Google https://t.co/yhVyRKQHjl — Farzad Mostashari (@Farzad_MD) October 18, 2019 "I am thrilled to join this great team and excited about the opportunity for impact on health," DeSalvo tweeted in response. Twitter: @MikeMiliardHITN Email the writer: mike.miliard@himssmedia.com Healthcare IT News is a publication of HIMSS Media.

For its most recent big healthcare hire, Google has recruited former National Coordinator for Health IT Dr. Karen DeSalvo to serve as its first chief health officer.

WHY IT MATTERS
The move, first reported by CNBC, is further evidence, as if more were needed, that the Mountain View, California-based technology titan is serious about its ambitions to disrupt the healthcare market.

Earlier this month, Google parent company Alphabet hired former FDA Commissioner Dr. Robert Califf – who, like DeSalvo, served during the Obama administration – to be the new head of strategy and policy for Verily Life Sciences and Google Health.

And about this time last year, Google tapped Dr. David Feinberg, who had served as CEO of world-class health system Geisinger, to help it develop and expand its healthcare strategy, organizing the various initiatives of Alphabet companies such as Verily, DeepMind and Google Cloud.

DeSalvo will report to Feinberg and will be tasked, among other things, with offering advice and perspective about clinician experience, according to CNBC.

THE LARGER TREND
DeSalvo served as National Coordinator for Health Information Technology from 2014 to 2016 and U.S. Assistant Secretary for Health from 2014 to 2017.

During her two-and-a-half year stint as ONC chief, she led a series of successful projects related to EHR certification for the meaningful use program, interoperability advancements, patient access initiatives and more.

Since her time in the federal government, DeSalvo has kept her CV well-updated with a series of high-profile jobs. In late 2017, she joined the faculty at Dell Medical School at The University of Texas at Austin, with professorships in both the Department of Internal Medicine and in the Department of Population Health.

In March 2018, she was elected president of the Society of General Internal Medicine.

She also joined Leavitt Partners, the consulting firm founded by former HHS Secretary Michael Leavitt, as a senior advisor.

A longtime leader in public policy, population health, social determinants and patient engagement, DeSalvo was commissioner of health for the city of New Orleans – where she helped to digitize the city's health IT infrastructure after Hurricane Katrina – before being appointed by President Obama to lead ONC.

ON THE RECORD
On Twitter, many of DeSalvo's health industry colleagues applauded the move:

Hear hear! And congrats @Google - you got a good one. @KBDeSalvo weaves “bold” and “insight” in a way that has served the nation well. Looking forward to hearing what you’ll (both) do next! https://t.co/jhPybxm6jx

— Jitin Asnaani (@jitin) October 18, 2019

the movement to open up more health data just got a massive shot in the arm! woot! congratulations @KBDeSalvo and to @dtfeinberg for building a great team! https://t.co/M3515KMYNL

— Aneesh Chopra (@aneeshchopra) October 18, 2019

Great pick! Congrats @KBDeSalvo @Google https://t.co/yhVyRKQHjl

— Farzad Mostashari (@Farzad_MD) October 18, 2019

"I am thrilled to join this great team and excited about the opportunity for impact on health," DeSalvo tweeted in response.

Twitter: @MikeMiliardHITN
Email the writer: mike.miliard@himssmedia.com

Healthcare IT News is a publication of HIMSS Media.

]]>
How should AI be designed and regulated, and who should it serve? http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/how-should-ai-be-designed-and-regulated-and-who-should-it-serve http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/how-should-ai-be-designed-and-regulated-and-who-should-it-serve Thu, 17 Oct 2019 14:11:23 CDT at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com That was the question Wednesday at the Connected Health Conference, as a panel of experts discussed the right regulatory approach to ensure developers can innovate – while also giving physicians and patients tools that work safely for them. AI-based coronary IT helps comprehensively treat patients with just one test http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/ai-based-coronary-it-helps-comprehensively-treat-patients-just-one-test http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/ai-based-coronary-it-helps-comprehensively-treat-patients-just-one-test Thu, 17 Oct 2019 12:53:24 CDT at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com The results from a coronary CTA, with the help of the vendor’s highly specialized technology, allow Prairie Heart Institute experts to facilitate a more customized approach to the care and management of their patients. European Data Summit to discuss medical 'data donation' and maturity models http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/european-data-summit-discuss-medical-data-donation-and-maturity-models http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/european-data-summit-discuss-medical-data-donation-and-maturity-models Thu, 17 Oct 2019 09:00:53 CDT at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com The event will see stakeholders debate the benefits and risks in future data management for healthcare. Artificial pancreas system better controls blood glucose levels than current technology http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/artificial-pancreas-system-better-controls-blood-glucose-levels-current-technology http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/artificial-pancreas-system-better-controls-blood-glucose-levels-current-technology Wed, 16 Oct 2019 21:00:00 CDT NIH News Release NIH-funded study of people with type 1 diabetes shows safety, efficacy benefits of new system. ]]> Nicotine addiction linked to diabetes through a DNA-regulating gene in animal models http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nicotine-addiction-linked-diabetes-through-dna-regulating-gene-animal-models http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nicotine-addiction-linked-diabetes-through-dna-regulating-gene-animal-models Wed, 16 Oct 2019 17:30:00 CDT NIH News Release Scientists found a crucial role for a diabetes-associated gene in regulating the response to nicotine in the brain. ]]> NIH scientists develop test for uncommon brain diseases http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-scientists-develop-test-uncommon-brain-diseases http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-scientists-develop-test-uncommon-brain-diseases Wed, 16 Oct 2019 17:15:00 CDT NIH News Release Samples of cerebrospinal fluid used to detect tauopathies. ]]> Frontotemporal lobar degeneration consortium combines and continues research efforts http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/frontotemporal-lobar-degeneration-consortium-combines-continues-research-efforts http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/frontotemporal-lobar-degeneration-consortium-combines-continues-research-efforts Wed, 16 Oct 2019 15:15:00 CDT NIH News Release NIH grant connects existing studies to form cornerstone for clinical research. ]]> Scientists work toward a rapid point-of-care diagnostic test for Lyme disease http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/scientists-work-toward-rapid-point-care-diagnostic-test-lyme-disease http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/scientists-work-toward-rapid-point-care-diagnostic-test-lyme-disease Wed, 16 Oct 2019 15:00:00 CDT NIH News Release Rapid assay for Lyme disease could lead to a practical test for use by healthcare providers. ]]> Physician-led accountable care organizations outperform hospital-led counterparts http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/physician-led-accountable-care-organizations-outperform-hospital-led-counterparts http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/physician-led-accountable-care-organizations-outperform-hospital-led-counterparts Wed, 16 Oct 2019 14:24:55 CDT at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com On average, physician-led ACOs produced almost 7 times the amount of Medicare savings per beneficiary than hospital-led ACOs. How blockchain can protect telemedicine programs http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/how-blockchain-can-protect-telemedicine-programs http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/how-blockchain-can-protect-telemedicine-programs Wed, 16 Oct 2019 11:20:43 CDT at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com A blockchain expert explains for healthcare CIOs and CISOs how the distributed ledger technology can defend telehealth systems against hackers. Tampa General Hospital, OnMed partner for new telemedicine stations http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/tampa-general-hospital-onmed-partner-new-telemedicine-stations http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/tampa-general-hospital-onmed-partner-new-telemedicine-stations Wed, 16 Oct 2019 10:44:51 CDT at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com OnMed's stations offer high definition video and audio capabilities, which allow for real-time consultations with a doctor or advanced practice provider. Microbleeds may worsen outcome after head injury http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/microbleeds-may-worsen-outcome-after-head-injury http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/microbleeds-may-worsen-outcome-after-head-injury Tue, 15 Oct 2019 14:00:00 CDT NIH News Release NIH study examines effects of blood vessel damage following brain injury. ]]> Q&A: John Halamka on worldwide trends in AI, blockchain, cloud and more http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/qa-john-halamka-worldwide-trends-ai-blockchain-cloud-and-more http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/qa-john-halamka-worldwide-trends-ai-blockchain-cloud-and-more Mon, 14 Oct 2019 14:07:00 CDT mmiliard at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy Longtime Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Chief Information Officer Dr. John Halamka left that role six months ago after more than two decades – during which time he also became one of the most vocal health information technology champions and visible thought leaders during a pivotal time of IT uptake. Halamka has been traveling the world recently – more than 400,000 miles this year, he says –  from Europe to Israel to Africa to China, back to his Sherborn, Massachusetts-based Unity Farm Sanctuary for a quick visit with Dudley, his shaggy Scottish Highland Bull, and then out again to explore the newest global trends in leading-edge digital health. Halamka will keynote the ConVerge2Xcelerate event in Boston on October 15, hosted by Blockchain in Healthcare Today – where he is editor-in-chief – and co-presented as part of the preconference activities of the Connected Health Conference. We caught up with him recently at another Boston event and asked him about what he's seeing on his travels. Q. You were CIO of Beth Israel Deaconess for so long – twenty two years. How has your newish gig, as International Healthcare Innovation Professor, been going? A. That's my academic title, my Harvard Medical School title, and that was three years ago. But the official transition from CIO, a hospital based-title, was March 1, 2019. That's when the merger of Beth Israel and Lahey came together, and the CEO and I talked about: How do you create innovation?  Q. So what is next with healthcare innovation? What have you been seeing on your travels that's intriguing? A. If you look all over the world, the themes are very similar: We have aging societies. Pretty much every country. So in China, Japan, the Nordics, Germany, UK, US, everyone is living longer, but birth rates are in many countries not at replacement levels. So just look, for example, at the Medicare trust fund: 3.5 people are going to be paying for my mom's retirement. 2.5 people are going to be paying your retirement. That fund is going broke. But countries all over the world are saying, wait a minute: healthcare is expensive, people are aging, we don't have enough workers paying for them, don't have enough doctors to care for them. We have to work differently. No one says, "What I really need is an API." I mean no one wakes up thinking that. But they do say, "You know, we can scale machine learning techniques, mobile, internet of things in a way that you don't need to drive to a doctor's office and be seen – in fact you can go deal with a chatbot." For a lot of the stuff you could deal with the machine learning algorithm for a lot. So you can use your specialty resources and a whole lot wiser fashion if you virtualize them over a set of tools so physicians are practicing atop their license. So all these countries are asking these questions. And how do you do that while maintaining privacy security and patient choice? These are hard problems. But the urgency to do it is high. Because the healthcare systems in most of the world aren't sustainable. Q. You mentioned practicing at the top of one's licence. At Health 2.0 in September, Mayo Clinic CIO Cris Ross gave a speech on that very topic – and he said that AI is one of the key things that will enable physicians to do just that. "This artificial intelligence stuff is real," he said. Do you agree? A. Well, absolutely. And so I ask the question: What is the machine learning application of 2019 you're going to want to adopt? Is it to replace our doctors with machine learning? No. It's going to be the simpler stuff that's real. I'll give you a real case: I was keynoting this Health Catalyst conference. I was doing all this flying hadn't slept a whole lot. This wonderful group of people took me out to dinner. I was dehydrated. Big meal. I stood up from the chair and I passed out. First time in my life it's ever happened. So ask yourself: The differential diagnosis for this 57 year old guy, hypertension history inherited from my father, unknown meds of any significance, no neurologic or cardiac issues to date, is lying on the floor unconscious. So play out the probabilities of disease. Well part of it is my genome. And part of it is my phenotype. And part of it is also my exposome. I'm from Massachusetts, where my farm is at the very center of Triple E and West Nile. And 48 hours before going to Salt Lake, I was working at night being eaten alive by mosquitoes next to the swamp. What do I have? What are you going to do? Well, the problem is you need techniques these machine learning techniques that look at population experience and at least give you guidance of probability. And in my particular case, there was more data: I'm wearing an engineering sample of the Withings Move ECG, it's just going through FDA clearance now. It has a full recording of my 1-lead ECG. So you could actually watch bradycardia immediately return to normal pulse. I had a vasovagal episode. I fainted. Because I was hot, dehydrated, had just eaten an enormous meal and the blood from my head went to my stomach. It was not West Nile. It was not a stroke. It was not a heart attack. But machine learning can say, "Here are your probabilities of disease states, doctor. As you evaluate this patient, take those into consideration." So it's workflow enhancement, decision support enhancement, which helps augment clinician resources so they're more efficient. Q. You mentioned that the big issue problems you see around the world are largely the same, whether it's the Nordics or a place like China. But obviously there are specific regional differences: Countries are different places on the continuum with regard to their technological maturity, there are different imperatives for value-based care. What are some of the notable things you've seen recently in your travels? A. Let's take Israel as an example. I do not endorse any product or service. This has nothing to do with any financial interests. But there's a wonderful machine learning researcher, Dr. Kira Radinsky, in Tel Aviv who started a company called Diagnostic Robotics. And what does that do? So you the patient woke up with a headache. Oh, is that headache different than usual? Do you have numbness, weakness? You answer all the questions and it's essentially Waze for medicine: Here's where you're sitting right now, and there are three doctors and here's where they are, and they are the folks that are going to be able to address the signs and symptoms you've delineated. And so you say, "OK, I want to go to this one." You book an appointment. And the note is auto generated based on the data that you've put into your phone. So in effect it's in Epic by the time you see the physician, the notes already written. And it includes at the bottom a little machine learning grid that says, based on everything we've heard about this patient, doctor, here are the three or four likely care plans you might want to do. So, Waze for healthcare. Not a bad idea! And that's coming out of Israel. The challenge in China is there's no primary care. And so the Chinese are also quite interested in creating tools for patients and families so that people get to that right setting of care at the right cost at the right time. Q. No primary care - so how does it work? A. You show up wherever you want. "I hear Dr. Famous is good." And the queues are hours and hours long. I's not an efficient use of existing resources, but it's not fun for patients and family either. Societies don't have the ability to navigate a healthcare system with transparency. And I think, especially when you have limited resources and limited funds, we've got to do that more efficiently. Q. You moderated a panel at the Annual Thought Leadership on Access Symposium about transformational strategies. What are some things you've learned from your time at BIDMC and now travelling around the world about building a culture of transformational change? A. There has to be an urgency to change, an incentive to change. And a willingness to accept failure. That's really a key issue. So many organizations say, "Oh, well, we've never tried this before. It could fail." Yeah, it could. And that's OK. It can. Each of the panelists today runs an innovation center or transformation center where they've got a protective space to fail. In fact, they celebrate failure. They even said they're going to give the best failure award of the year. It's a badge of courage. And I contrast that with two societies. I love Japan. But everybody there is very concerned about face. Respect. Reputation. So if you go to a Japanese person and say, "We want you to try something novel and you may fail completely," it's like, "Oh, well then I'd better not do it." The notion of an entrepreneurial Japanese person is tough because of that concern. And in Germany they're very risk averse. Fabulous engineering, but they have the same sort of issue. What if we don't succeed? Our reputational loss will be hard to recover from. It's very to get innovation if you're so risk averse. Now, I don't mean that we're going to compromise patient privacy or safety. That's not what we're talking about here. You set guardrails so its appropriate, but we're just willing to tolerate experimentation. Q. Speaking of being cautious. What are your thoughts on the proposed 21st Century Cures rules from ONC? Some pretty big stakeholders have said they want to slow them down or scale them back, and have called for more congressional oversight. A. I have a couple thoughts. First of all, understand exactly what happens every time there's a new rule. It doesn't even matter what the rule says. I served the Bush administration for four years, the Obama administration for six years. And here's what the regulators told me: If you want to go to the moon, make sure you legislate or regulate a trip to Mars. Because that's what's going to everyone's going to happen: "Mars? Are you crazy? Oh, moon? That's OK." You always ask for more and then you settle on something a little less. That's totally normal.  Everyone agrees patient universal access to data is great. No one's arguing that. It's about workflow. And so the example I raised this morning is my mom is approaching 80. And I said, "Mom, you know we've got Argonaut FHIR enabled API and you can download all your data." And she said, "I don't know what that means and I'm not sure why I want to, but I'm very happy to delegate to you that responsibility." Well at the moment we don't quite have the workflow that enables an elder to delegate to another person full access to their API data downloads. We want that and we need that. We just don't have it. We've gotta figure that out.If you look at the workflow implementation of the rule there's a lot of subtlety that we need to work through. And secondly, the rule says any app. So that could be an app from two guys in Shanghai in a garage and it's malware. Should be a credentialing or certification process for the app? And maybe the regulation says we will let in those apps that at least have had some sort of review process. I have no inside information, but let me tell you what I think the strategy is: What is the technical difference between adding an API for a patient and family access or adding an API for provider or payer access? The answer is there's basically no technical difference. So again just guessing what Seema Verma was thinking. Who's going to object to patients getting access to their own data. No one! So let's start with that because it means you'll put the technical infrastructure in – and then it's really straightforward to expand it to other use cases. Q. What else is on your radar screen for emerging technologies, based on what you've seen around the world? A. Clearly, everyone's moving to cloud-hosted services. EHRs should not be pieces of software hosted on ground that you have to maintain a patch and all the rest right. The service model clearly is the direction it's going in. Our incumbent EHR vendors are slowly getting there. And why is that so key? Let's say there's a service that I want. How easy is it to plumb from cloud to cloud? Not hard, right? It's not an IT thing or a firewall thing. Connecting an external service to a cloud-hosted EHR is pretty straightforward. So it offers agility. Patients and families want to use mobile apps in their phones to access services. And so certainly we're seeing the move to Internet of Things, connected devices, monitors in the home.  Certainly that's a trend. But figuring out what to do with that data – where to store it, how to interpret it, that's still a challenge. Q. What about blockchain? On top of all your other credentials, you're also editor-in-chief of Blockchain in Healthcare Today. A. Blockchain is a distributed ledger you can write to and never erase. It isn't a database. It isn't an analytic tool. But it's good for certain kinds of use cases. You see the pharmaceutical industry, which is required to do lot number tracking, purity tracking and that sort of thing. Fabulous thing to do. We'll write our lots into the ledger. You'll understand what was produced where we could track medications for safety. Right. Or Synaptic Health Alliance: a bunch of payers who created provider directories, put a ledger up there that anyone can read and that will be a provider directory for universal use. Great idea. Or here's a plaintiff-attorney example: You weren't admitted to Harvard. I'm so sorry. But then your parents sue because clearly I must have made a mistake delivering you as a baby 23 years ago. I make this up as a silly example, but you would not believe the malpractice assertions that happen. And they say, "Produce the records from 23 years ago," and I say, "Here they are." But they say, "Those are incomplete. Or, "Those have been altered over time." Blockchain can be used to say, "Look I at the time wrote a note. The note was hashed. The hash was put in the blockchain. Twenty-three years go by, and look, the note still matches the hash. I can prove the medical records weren't altered in those 23 years. So it's proof of data integrity. That's another great use case. Q. What else do you see, when you look into the future? A. The hardest aspect of everything we're talking about is what the nature of a hospital and doctor's office will look like in, pick your timeframe, 10 years, 25 years. Although I always hate to say 25 years, because who would have predicted the Internet as it is back then? You know who would have protected the rise of Facebook, Amazon, Netflix and Google? Q. Even 12 years ago, the smartphone didn't exist. A. And maybe that was okay. (Laughs.) But If you think of what the hospital of the next decade is going to turn into, how many ward beds are we're going to have? Fewer and fewer. Because much of what we do today in a ward bed can be done in an ambulatory setting, or your home. Hospitals, I guess, are going to transform an emergency department that is still going to be dealing with traumatic issues –heart attack, stroke, etc. – and a bunch of ICU beds for the sickest of the sick. And everything else becomes a bunch of distributed digital health services. And when you say to hospital CEOs, "So what are you doing to close your ward beds and become a digitally-transformed organization moving services to the cloud and becoming virtual, they say, "Oh. That sounds like a threat to my existence. I don't know." So I think the hardest part of the next 10 years will be a radical transformation of business models. Q. But meanwhile, rural hospitals keep closing. In a lot of these places there's not even broadband. A. As I travel the world, in rural India rural Africa, and rural China and I've got five bars of 4G and yet there are places in Boston where I can't make a call. So you are correct that the infrastructure – 4G, 5G, ubiquitous wireless broadband – is a kind of prerequisite for having this digital health system of the future. Especially if we're going to reach into rural areas and offer telemedicine and telehealth. Q. So how much traveling do you do these days? Have your tracked how many days a year you're on the road? A. I'll do 400,000 mile this year. Flight attendants are only allowed 250,000 because of the wear and tear. So clearly, I'm doing something wrong (laughs). I give the frequent flyer miles to my Mom and she travels free wherever she goes. But the other interesting challenge is that since I'm serving governments throughout the world – I joke that the only governments I'm not serving areNorth Korea and Iran, but pretty much everybody else – I'm put on the state airline of every country which means I don't have loyalty in any one airline, and therefore I'm not quite platinum. Q. So what are your travel tips? You mentioned the reason you wear black all the time is that it's easy on the road. A. Pack light. Less is more. Never check. When it comes to dealing with jet lag, and alcohol and caffeine don't help. They actually just make you feel worse. Melatonin, Ambien, taking drugs is not going to help. So when you land in a place, eat. Food. On the schedule of the place you work in. So when you have breakfast in the place that you're in, you more rapidly say, "Oh, it's morning now. Never nap. That will really screw you up. Q. Not even a power nap? They say those are good for you. A. Generally true. But what could happen when you nap is you soon discover it's 10 p.m. in the place you're in and you're like, "Oh I'm wide awake." Just power through the fatigue of the first day, eating the meals on schedule and sleeping you know 10 p.m. to 6 a.m. in the place you are. Exercise. Avoid the alcohol and caffeine trap. And you'll be OK. Q. You must look forward to getting back to the farm. A. Yes, but I have 10 keynote addresses this week, so it won't be until Saturday. But I'm looking forward to a day of just shoveling manure. Q. I saw your photos of your highland bull. He's an impressive animal.  A. I get home and give him a back rub. He misses me. Twitter: @MikeMiliardHITN Email the writer: mike.miliard@himssmedia.com Healthcare IT News is a publication of HIMSS Media.

Longtime Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Chief Information Officer Dr. John Halamka left that role six months ago after more than two decades – during which time he also became one of the most vocal health information technology champions and visible thought leaders during a pivotal time of IT uptake.

Halamka has been traveling the world recently – more than 400,000 miles this year, he says –  from Europe to Israel to Africa to China, back to his Sherborn, Massachusetts-based Unity Farm Sanctuary for a quick visit with Dudley, his shaggy Scottish Highland Bull, and then out again to explore the newest global trends in leading-edge digital health.

Halamka will keynote the ConVerge2Xcelerate event in Boston on October 15, hosted by Blockchain in Healthcare Today – where he is editor-in-chief – and co-presented as part of the preconference activities of the Connected Health Conference.

We caught up with him recently at another Boston event and asked him about what he's seeing on his travels.

Q. You were CIO of Beth Israel Deaconess for so long – twenty two years. How has your newish gig, as International Healthcare Innovation Professor, been going?

A. That's my academic title, my Harvard Medical School title, and that was three years ago. But the official transition from CIO, a hospital based-title, was March 1, 2019. That's when the merger of Beth Israel and Lahey came together, and the CEO and I talked about: How do you create innovation? 

Q. So what is next with healthcare innovation? What have you been seeing on your travels that's intriguing?

A. If you look all over the world, the themes are very similar: We have aging societies. Pretty much every country. So in China, Japan, the Nordics, Germany, UK, US, everyone is living longer, but birth rates are in many countries not at replacement levels.

So just look, for example, at the Medicare trust fund: 3.5 people are going to be paying for my mom's retirement. 2.5 people are going to be paying your retirement. That fund is going broke. But countries all over the world are saying, wait a minute: healthcare is expensive, people are aging, we don't have enough workers paying for them, don't have enough doctors to care for them.

We have to work differently. No one says, "What I really need is an API." I mean no one wakes up thinking that. But they do say, "You know, we can scale machine learning techniques, mobile, internet of things in a way that you don't need to drive to a doctor's office and be seen – in fact you can go deal with a chatbot." For a lot of the stuff you could deal with the machine learning algorithm for a lot. So you can use your specialty resources and a whole lot wiser fashion if you virtualize them over a set of tools so physicians are practicing atop their license.

So all these countries are asking these questions. And how do you do that while maintaining privacy security and patient choice? These are hard problems. But the urgency to do it is high. Because the healthcare systems in most of the world aren't sustainable.

Q. You mentioned practicing at the top of one's licence. At Health 2.0 in September, Mayo Clinic CIO Cris Ross gave a speech on that very topic – and he said that AI is one of the key things that will enable physicians to do just that. "This artificial intelligence stuff is real," he said. Do you agree?

A. Well, absolutely. And so I ask the question: What is the machine learning application of 2019 you're going to want to adopt? Is it to replace our doctors with machine learning? No. It's going to be the simpler stuff that's real.

I'll give you a real case: I was keynoting this Health Catalyst conference. I was doing all this flying hadn't slept a whole lot. This wonderful group of people took me out to dinner. I was dehydrated. Big meal. I stood up from the chair and I passed out. First time in my life it's ever happened.

So ask yourself: The differential diagnosis for this 57 year old guy, hypertension history inherited from my father, unknown meds of any significance, no neurologic or cardiac issues to date, is lying on the floor unconscious.

So play out the probabilities of disease. Well part of it is my genome. And part of it is my phenotype. And part of it is also my exposome. I'm from Massachusetts, where my farm is at the very center of Triple E and West Nile. And 48 hours before going to Salt Lake, I was working at night being eaten alive by mosquitoes next to the swamp.

What do I have? What are you going to do? Well, the problem is you need techniques these machine learning techniques that look at population experience and at least give you guidance of probability.

And in my particular case, there was more data: I'm wearing an engineering sample of the Withings Move ECG, it's just going through FDA clearance now. It has a full recording of my 1-lead ECG. So you could actually watch bradycardia immediately return to normal pulse.

I had a vasovagal episode. I fainted. Because I was hot, dehydrated, had just eaten an enormous meal and the blood from my head went to my stomach. It was not West Nile. It was not a stroke. It was not a heart attack.

But machine learning can say, "Here are your probabilities of disease states, doctor. As you evaluate this patient, take those into consideration." So it's workflow enhancement, decision support enhancement, which helps augment clinician resources so they're more efficient.

Q. You mentioned that the big issue problems you see around the world are largely the same, whether it's the Nordics or a place like China. But obviously there are specific regional differences: Countries are different places on the continuum with regard to their technological maturity, there are different imperatives for value-based care. What are some of the notable things you've seen recently in your travels?

A. Let's take Israel as an example. I do not endorse any product or service. This has nothing to do with any financial interests. But there's a wonderful machine learning researcher, Dr. Kira Radinsky, in Tel Aviv who started a company called Diagnostic Robotics.

And what does that do? So you the patient woke up with a headache. Oh, is that headache different than usual? Do you have numbness, weakness? You answer all the questions and it's essentially Waze for medicine: Here's where you're sitting right now, and there are three doctors and here's where they are, and they are the folks that are going to be able to address the signs and symptoms you've delineated.

And so you say, "OK, I want to go to this one." You book an appointment. And the note is auto generated based on the data that you've put into your phone. So in effect it's in Epic by the time you see the physician, the notes already written. And it includes at the bottom a little machine learning grid that says, based on everything we've heard about this patient, doctor, here are the three or four likely care plans you might want to do.

So, Waze for healthcare. Not a bad idea! And that's coming out of Israel. The challenge in China is there's no primary care. And so the Chinese are also quite interested in creating tools for patients and families so that people get to that right setting of care at the right cost at the right time.

Q. No primary care - so how does it work?

A. You show up wherever you want. "I hear Dr. Famous is good." And the queues are hours and hours long. I's not an efficient use of existing resources, but it's not fun for patients and family either.

Societies don't have the ability to navigate a healthcare system with transparency. And I think, especially when you have limited resources and limited funds, we've got to do that more efficiently.

Q. You moderated a panel at the Annual Thought Leadership on Access Symposium about transformational strategies. What are some things you've learned from your time at BIDMC and now travelling around the world about building a culture of transformational change?

A. There has to be an urgency to change, an incentive to change. And a willingness to accept failure. That's really a key issue.

So many organizations say, "Oh, well, we've never tried this before. It could fail." Yeah, it could. And that's OK. It can. Each of the panelists today runs an innovation center or transformation center where they've got a protective space to fail. In fact, they celebrate failure. They even said they're going to give the best failure award of the year. It's a badge of courage.

And I contrast that with two societies. I love Japan. But everybody there is very concerned about face. Respect. Reputation. So if you go to a Japanese person and say, "We want you to try something novel and you may fail completely," it's like, "Oh, well then I'd better not do it." The notion of an entrepreneurial Japanese person is tough because of that concern.

And in Germany they're very risk averse. Fabulous engineering, but they have the same sort of issue. What if we don't succeed? Our reputational loss will be hard to recover from. It's very to get innovation if you're so risk averse.

Now, I don't mean that we're going to compromise patient privacy or safety. That's not what we're talking about here. You set guardrails so its appropriate, but we're just willing to tolerate experimentation.

Q. Speaking of being cautious. What are your thoughts on the proposed 21st Century Cures rules from ONC? Some pretty big stakeholders have said they want to slow them down or scale them back, and have called for more congressional oversight.

A. I have a couple thoughts. First of all, understand exactly what happens every time there's a new rule. It doesn't even matter what the rule says. I served the Bush administration for four years, the Obama administration for six years. And here's what the regulators told me: If you want to go to the moon, make sure you legislate or regulate a trip to Mars. Because that's what's going to everyone's going to happen: "Mars? Are you crazy? Oh, moon? That's OK." You always ask for more and then you settle on something a little less. That's totally normal. 

Everyone agrees patient universal access to data is great. No one's arguing that. It's about workflow. And so the example I raised this morning is my mom is approaching 80. And I said, "Mom, you know we've got Argonaut FHIR enabled API and you can download all your data."

And she said, "I don't know what that means and I'm not sure why I want to, but I'm very happy to delegate to you that responsibility." Well at the moment we don't quite have the workflow that enables an elder to delegate to another person full access to their API data downloads. We want that and we need that. We just don't have it. We've gotta figure that out.If you look at the workflow implementation of the rule there's a lot of subtlety that we need to work through.

And secondly, the rule says any app. So that could be an app from two guys in Shanghai in a garage and it's malware. Should be a credentialing or certification process for the app? And maybe the regulation says we will let in those apps that at least have had some sort of review process.

I have no inside information, but let me tell you what I think the strategy is: What is the technical difference between adding an API for a patient and family access or adding an API for provider or payer access? The answer is there's basically no technical difference. So again just guessing what Seema Verma was thinking.

Who's going to object to patients getting access to their own data. No one! So let's start with that because it means you'll put the technical infrastructure in – and then it's really straightforward to expand it to other use cases.

Q. What else is on your radar screen for emerging technologies, based on what you've seen around the world?

A. Clearly, everyone's moving to cloud-hosted services. EHRs should not be pieces of software hosted on ground that you have to maintain a patch and all the rest right. The service model clearly is the direction it's going in. Our incumbent EHR vendors are slowly getting there.

And why is that so key? Let's say there's a service that I want. How easy is it to plumb from cloud to cloud? Not hard, right? It's not an IT thing or a firewall thing. Connecting an external service to a cloud-hosted EHR is pretty straightforward. So it offers agility.

Patients and families want to use mobile apps in their phones to access services. And so certainly we're seeing the move to Internet of Things, connected devices, monitors in the home. 

Certainly that's a trend. But figuring out what to do with that data – where to store it, how to interpret it, that's still a challenge.

Q. What about blockchain? On top of all your other credentials, you're also editor-in-chief of Blockchain in Healthcare Today.

A. Blockchain is a distributed ledger you can write to and never erase. It isn't a database. It isn't an analytic tool. But it's good for certain kinds of use cases. You see the pharmaceutical industry, which is required to do lot number tracking, purity tracking and that sort of thing. Fabulous thing to do. We'll write our lots into the ledger. You'll understand what was produced where we could track medications for safety. Right.

Or Synaptic Health Alliance: a bunch of payers who created provider directories, put a ledger up there that anyone can read and that will be a provider directory for universal use. Great idea.

Or here's a plaintiff-attorney example: You weren't admitted to Harvard. I'm so sorry. But then your parents sue because clearly I must have made a mistake delivering you as a baby 23 years ago. I make this up as a silly example, but you would not believe the malpractice assertions that happen. And they say, "Produce the records from 23 years ago," and I say, "Here they are." But they say, "Those are incomplete. Or, "Those have been altered over time."

Blockchain can be used to say, "Look I at the time wrote a note. The note was hashed. The hash was put in the blockchain. Twenty-three years go by, and look, the note still matches the hash. I can prove the medical records weren't altered in those 23 years. So it's proof of data integrity. That's another great use case.

Q. What else do you see, when you look into the future?

A. The hardest aspect of everything we're talking about is what the nature of a hospital and doctor's office will look like in, pick your timeframe, 10 years, 25 years. Although I always hate to say 25 years, because who would have predicted the Internet as it is back then? You know who would have protected the rise of Facebook, Amazon, Netflix and Google?

Q. Even 12 years ago, the smartphone didn't exist.

A. And maybe that was okay. (Laughs.) But If you think of what the hospital of the next decade is going to turn into, how many ward beds are we're going to have? Fewer and fewer. Because much of what we do today in a ward bed can be done in an ambulatory setting, or your home.

Hospitals, I guess, are going to transform an emergency department that is still going to be dealing with traumatic issues –heart attack, stroke, etc. – and a bunch of ICU beds for the sickest of the sick. And everything else becomes a bunch of distributed digital health services.

And when you say to hospital CEOs, "So what are you doing to close your ward beds and become a digitally-transformed organization moving services to the cloud and becoming virtual, they say, "Oh. That sounds like a threat to my existence. I don't know." So I think the hardest part of the next 10 years will be a radical transformation of business models.

Q. But meanwhile, rural hospitals keep closing. In a lot of these places there's not even broadband.

A. As I travel the world, in rural India rural Africa, and rural China and I've got five bars of 4G and yet there are places in Boston where I can't make a call. So you are correct that the infrastructure – 4G, 5G, ubiquitous wireless broadband – is a kind of prerequisite for having this digital health system of the future. Especially if we're going to reach into rural areas and offer telemedicine and telehealth.

Q. So how much traveling do you do these days? Have your tracked how many days a year you're on the road?

A. I'll do 400,000 mile this year. Flight attendants are only allowed 250,000 because of the wear and tear. So clearly, I'm doing something wrong (laughs). I give the frequent flyer miles to my Mom and she travels free wherever she goes.

But the other interesting challenge is that since I'm serving governments throughout the world – I joke that the only governments I'm not serving areNorth Korea and Iran, but pretty much everybody else – I'm put on the state airline of every country which means I don't have loyalty in any one airline, and therefore I'm not quite platinum.

Q. So what are your travel tips? You mentioned the reason you wear black all the time is that it's easy on the road.

A. Pack light. Less is more. Never check. When it comes to dealing with jet lag, and alcohol and caffeine don't help. They actually just make you feel worse. Melatonin, Ambien, taking drugs is not going to help. So when you land in a place, eat. Food. On the schedule of the place you work in. So when you have breakfast in the place that you're in, you more rapidly say, "Oh, it's morning now. Never nap. That will really screw you up.

Q. Not even a power nap? They say those are good for you.

A. Generally true. But what could happen when you nap is you soon discover it's 10 p.m. in the place you're in and you're like, "Oh I'm wide awake." Just power through the fatigue of the first day, eating the meals on schedule and sleeping you know 10 p.m. to 6 a.m. in the place you are. Exercise. Avoid the alcohol and caffeine trap. And you'll be OK.

Q. You must look forward to getting back to the farm.

A. Yes, but I have 10 keynote addresses this week, so it won't be until Saturday. But I'm looking forward to a day of just shoveling manure.

Q. I saw your photos of your highland bull. He's an impressive animal. 

A. I get home and give him a back rub. He misses me.

Twitter: @MikeMiliardHITN
Email the writer: mike.miliard@himssmedia.com

Healthcare IT News is a publication of HIMSS Media.

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On-demand: Livestream from HIMSS AsiaPac19 Conference & Exhibition http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/video/asia-pacific/demand-livestream-himss-asiapac19-conference-exhibition http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/video/asia-pacific/demand-livestream-himss-asiapac19-conference-exhibition Tue, 08 Oct 2019 06:54:25 CDT rickdagley at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy Primary topic: Patient EngagementDisable Auto Tagging: Short Headline: On-demand: Livestream from HIMSS AsiaPac19 Conference & ExhibitionFeatured Decision Content: Region Tag: Asia Pacific
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Learning from other countries’ experiences in digitising healthcare http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/europe/learning-other-countries-experiences-digitising-healthcare http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/europe/learning-other-countries-experiences-digitising-healthcare Tue, 08 Oct 2019 06:08:28 CDT dyogendra at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy While it’s clear that there are fundamental differences between different regions across the globe grappling with the challenges of digitising their healthcare systems, cross-border collaboration can stimulate new approaches and help stakeholders learn from the failures and successes of others. To facilitate sharing of information, the HIMSS Foundation, in partnership with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Office of the Chief Technology Officer, launched earlier this year an exchange programme with NHS Digital, England’s national provider of information, data and IT systems for health and social care. It aimed to leverage data and help providers tailor services according to emerging demand, creating an opportunity to build meaningful and sustainable communities that could later expand to global partnerships. At the end of August, the 10-day visit brought health informaticists, data scientists and data strategists from the U.S. to NHS Digital’s headquarters in Leeds to identify new ideas for health data science projects. Earlier this month, Healthcare IT News spoke to Joe Gibson, director of epidemiology at the Marion County Public Health Department in Indianapolis, one of specialists involved in the programme, about the experience. This interview has been edited for length and clarity. Q: Tell us, first of all, what sparked your interest in the initiative? A: I was very interested in going to the UK and seeing how they approach some of the issues that we face here [in the United States] too. I am generally interested in how people organise their information systems and how they organise their analysis teams. I was paying particular attention to that. Q: What were some of the key observations that you made on site? A: I saw that they tended to form analysis teams from people with different, fairly deep technical specialties, rather than using an approach where everyone in the team can do a lot of things. I was also struck by the amount of focus, resources and staff that they put toward understanding the customer well. I repeatedly saw a commitment by NHS analysts to understand the customer, understand what the customer needed, and to make sure that what NHS Digital produced was understood well and was being used effectively. Q: Why do you think there is such a big focus on this? A: It really seemed to be the organisational norm, and I think it’s a culture that can be embedded within our organisation here as well. It might be an intrinsic reflection of the NHS model compared to the US model to organising health information. NHS Digital is incentivised to provide what most patients and providers find most valuable, while incentives in the US system are less patient-centred. Q: And is this something that you’d like to apply in your work as well? A: Yes, for me, NHS Digital's focus on understanding the customer was the most directly applicable takeaway, I will be changing how I organise my own resources so that I have people who are spending more designated, dedicated time around getting feedback from customers and what we produce and have a bit more time with customers so that we make sure that we really understand what information they’re most interested in. Q: How different was what you learned on site about the healthcare system from what you knew before about it? A: It was very different. Beforehand, my idea was that England had this unified system, the national health service, and I thought that there’d be a master data system where data came together and they could analyse it and do amazing things. And I was struck that there is no single NHS. There is an NHS England, there is an NHS Digital, there are all these different components, but there was no unified organisation. There were all these different organisations that coordinate with each other. The other thing that really surprised me was the lack of access that NHS Digital had to individual level data within the system. Q: And did you hear of any initiatives trying to tackle some of these issues? A: Yes, they talked a lot about plans they are implementing to improve how they receive and organise individual level data. They talked about the regional health care record repositories, similar in a way to the Health Information Exchanges that we have in the US, with data pooled together, to improve the sharing of data between health and care providers, while also making room for the NHS to be more efficient. There were a couple of discussions about social determinants of health as well, and they talked about social prescribing. In the US, we are also trying to figure out social determinants of health, how to measure them and how to measure their impact, and I’m fairly sure this is going to be one of the areas where we are going to have lots of discussions and exchange of ideas over the next year and beyond if we keep this exchange going. Healthcare IT News is a HIMSS Media publication.

While it’s clear that there are fundamental differences between different regions across the globe grappling with the challenges of digitising their healthcare systems, cross-border collaboration can stimulate new approaches and help stakeholders learn from the failures and successes of others.

To facilitate sharing of information, the HIMSS Foundation, in partnership with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Office of the Chief Technology Officer, launched earlier this year an exchange programme with NHS Digital, England’s national provider of information, data and IT systems for health and social care. It aimed to leverage data and help providers tailor services according to emerging demand, creating an opportunity to build meaningful and sustainable communities that could later expand to global partnerships.

At the end of August, the 10-day visit brought health informaticists, data scientists and data strategists from the U.S. to NHS Digital’s headquarters in Leeds to identify new ideas for health data science projects.

Earlier this month, Healthcare IT News spoke to Joe Gibson, director of epidemiology at the Marion County Public Health Department in Indianapolis, one of specialists involved in the programme, about the experience.

This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

Q: Tell us, first of all, what sparked your interest in the initiative?

A: I was very interested in going to the UK and seeing how they approach some of the issues that we face here [in the United States] too. I am generally interested in how people organise their information systems and how they organise their analysis teams. I was paying particular attention to that.

Q: What were some of the key observations that you made on site?

A: I saw that they tended to form analysis teams from people with different, fairly deep technical specialties, rather than using an approach where everyone in the team can do a lot of things. I was also struck by the amount of focus, resources and staff that they put toward understanding the customer well. I repeatedly saw a commitment by NHS analysts to understand the customer, understand what the customer needed, and to make sure that what NHS Digital produced was understood well and was being used effectively.

Q: Why do you think there is such a big focus on this?

A: It really seemed to be the organisational norm, and I think it’s a culture that can be embedded within our organisation here as well. It might be an intrinsic reflection of the NHS model compared to the US model to organising health information. NHS Digital is incentivised to provide what most patients and providers find most valuable, while incentives in the US system are less patient-centred.

Q: And is this something that you’d like to apply in your work as well?

A: Yes, for me, NHS Digital's focus on understanding the customer was the most directly applicable takeaway, I will be changing how I organise my own resources so that I have people who are spending more designated, dedicated time around getting feedback from customers and what we produce and have a bit more time with customers so that we make sure that we really understand what information they’re most interested in.

Q: How different was what you learned on site about the healthcare system from what you knew before about it?

A: It was very different. Beforehand, my idea was that England had this unified system, the national health service, and I thought that there’d be a master data system where data came together and they could analyse it and do amazing things. And I was struck that there is no single NHS. There is an NHS England, there is an NHS Digital, there are all these different components, but there was no unified organisation. There were all these different organisations that coordinate with each other. The other thing that really surprised me was the lack of access that NHS Digital had to individual level data within the system.

Q: And did you hear of any initiatives trying to tackle some of these issues?

A: Yes, they talked a lot about plans they are implementing to improve how they receive and organise individual level data. They talked about the regional health care record repositories, similar in a way to the Health Information Exchanges that we have in the US, with data pooled together, to improve the sharing of data between health and care providers, while also making room for the NHS to be more efficient. There were a couple of discussions about social determinants of health as well, and they talked about social prescribing. In the US, we are also trying to figure out social determinants of health, how to measure them and how to measure their impact, and I’m fairly sure this is going to be one of the areas where we are going to have lots of discussions and exchange of ideas over the next year and beyond if we keep this exchange going.

Healthcare IT News is a HIMSS Media publication.

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URGENT/11: FDA issues alert for cyber vulnerability that threatens medical devices, networks http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/urgent11-fda-issues-alert-cyber-vulnerability-threatens-medical-devices-networks http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/urgent11-fda-issues-alert-cyber-vulnerability-threatens-medical-devices-networks Wed, 02 Oct 2019 11:42:58 CDT mmiliard at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy The U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued a safety communication on Tuesday – aimed at healthcare organizations, IT professionals, device manufacturers and patients – warning of the cybersecurity vulnerabilities known as URGENT/11. WHY IT MATTERS The risk, said FDA officials in the communication, is that URGENT/11, if exploited by a remote attacker, could pose safety and security risks for connected medical devices and hospital networks. The URGENT/11 vulnerabilities center around a third-party software, IPnet, that computers use to communicate with each other over a network. They affect at least six different operating systems and could impact connected equipment such as routers, connected devices or other critical infrastructure. "Security researchers, manufacturers and the FDA are aware that the following operating systems are affected, but the vulnerability may not be included in all versions of these operating systems," the FDA said, listing the operating systems: VxWorks (by Wind River) Operating System Embedded (OSE) (by ENEA) INTEGRITY (by GreenHills) ThreadX (by Microsoft) ITRON (by TRON) ZebOS (by IP Infusion) "These cybersecurity vulnerabilities may allow a remote user to take control of a medical device and change its function, cause denial of service, or cause information leaks or logical flaws, which may prevent a device from functioning properly or at all," said officials. While the FDA notes that it has not received reports of any adverse events related to URGENT/11 vulnerabilities, the risk is real enough that it issued a series of recommendations for providers, IT professionals and patients: Security and IT staff should monitor network traffic and logs for any indications that an URGENT/11 exploit is taking place, and be sure to use firewalls, virtual private networks or other technologies that minimize exposure to exploitation. Providers should contact medical device manufacturers to determine which devices may be in use in their facilities – or by their patients – and develop mitigation plans for these potential vulnerabilities. Additionally, they should reach out to patients with medical devices to let them know they could be affected, and remind them to seek help right away if they have reason to think the operation or functionality of their device has changed unexpectedly. THE LARGER TREND As FDA officials note, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security has been aware of the URGENT/11 vulnerability since July. Healthcare IT News reported then that the 11 zero-day vulnerabilities first discovered by Armis labs could directly impact everything from the routine functioning of a hospital’s basic facilities to life-critical operations. DHS issued a list of mitigations and patches to protect against the risk, but the process is labor-intensive one given the sheer number of devices that could be affected – as many as 200 million, by some estimates. The FDA says it is working with device manufacturers and healthcare providers to develop new approaches to securing devices across their product lifecycle. Meanwhile, as it continues to assess new information concerning the URGENT/11 vulnerabilities, it's asking the manufacturers to work with providers to determine which devices could be affected and help them develop risk mitigation plans. ON THE RECORD "The FDA urges manufacturers everywhere to remain vigilant about their medical products – to monitor and assess cybersecurity vulnerability risks, and to be proactive about disclosing vulnerabilities and mitigations to address them," FDA Principal Deputy Commissioner Dr. Amy Abernethy said in a statement. "While we are not aware of patients who may have been harmed by this particular cybersecurity vulnerability, the risk of patient harm if such a vulnerability were left unaddressed could be significant," said Dr. Suzanne Schwartz, deputy director of the Office of Strategic Partnerships and Technology Innovation in the FDA's Center for Devices and Radiological Health. "It's important for manufacturers to be aware that the nature of these vulnerabilities allows the attack to occur undetected and without user interaction," she added. "Because an attack may be interpreted by the device as a normal network communication, it may remain invisible to security measures." Twitter: @MikeMiliardHITN Email the writer: mike.miliard@himssmedia.com Healthcare IT News is a publication of HIMSS Media.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued a safety communication on Tuesday – aimed at healthcare organizations, IT professionals, device manufacturers and patients – warning of the cybersecurity vulnerabilities known as URGENT/11.

WHY IT MATTERS
The risk, said FDA officials in the communication, is that URGENT/11, if exploited by a remote attacker, could pose safety and security risks for connected medical devices and hospital networks.

The URGENT/11 vulnerabilities center around a third-party software, IPnet, that computers use to communicate with each other over a network. They affect at least six different operating systems and could impact connected equipment such as routers, connected devices or other critical infrastructure.

"Security researchers, manufacturers and the FDA are aware that the following operating systems are affected, but the vulnerability may not be included in all versions of these operating systems," the FDA said, listing the operating systems:

  • VxWorks (by Wind River)
  • Operating System Embedded (OSE) (by ENEA)
  • INTEGRITY (by GreenHills)
  • ThreadX (by Microsoft)
  • ITRON (by TRON)
  • ZebOS (by IP Infusion)

"These cybersecurity vulnerabilities may allow a remote user to take control of a medical device and change its function, cause denial of service, or cause information leaks or logical flaws, which may prevent a device from functioning properly or at all," said officials.

While the FDA notes that it has not received reports of any adverse events related to URGENT/11 vulnerabilities, the risk is real enough that it issued a series of recommendations for providers, IT professionals and patients:

Security and IT staff should monitor network traffic and logs for any indications that an URGENT/11 exploit is taking place, and be sure to use firewalls, virtual private networks or other technologies that minimize exposure to exploitation.

Providers should contact medical device manufacturers to determine which devices may be in use in their facilities – or by their patients – and develop mitigation plans for these potential vulnerabilities.

Additionally, they should reach out to patients with medical devices to let them know they could be affected, and remind them to seek help right away if they have reason to think the operation or functionality of their device has changed unexpectedly.

THE LARGER TREND
As FDA officials note, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security has been aware of the URGENT/11 vulnerability since July. Healthcare IT News reported then that the 11 zero-day vulnerabilities first discovered by Armis labs could directly impact everything from the routine functioning of a hospital’s basic facilities to life-critical operations.

DHS issued a list of mitigations and patches to protect against the risk, but the process is labor-intensive one given the sheer number of devices that could be affected – as many as 200 million, by some estimates.

The FDA says it is working with device manufacturers and healthcare providers to develop new approaches to securing devices across their product lifecycle. Meanwhile, as it continues to assess new information concerning the URGENT/11 vulnerabilities, it's asking the manufacturers to work with providers to determine which devices could be affected and help them develop risk mitigation plans.

ON THE RECORD
"The FDA urges manufacturers everywhere to remain vigilant about their medical products – to monitor and assess cybersecurity vulnerability risks, and to be proactive about disclosing vulnerabilities and mitigations to address them," FDA Principal Deputy Commissioner Dr. Amy Abernethy said in a statement.

"While we are not aware of patients who may have been harmed by this particular cybersecurity vulnerability, the risk of patient harm if such a vulnerability were left unaddressed could be significant," said Dr. Suzanne Schwartz, deputy director of the Office of Strategic Partnerships and Technology Innovation in the FDA's Center for Devices and Radiological Health.

"It's important for manufacturers to be aware that the nature of these vulnerabilities allows the attack to occur undetected and without user interaction," she added. "Because an attack may be interpreted by the device as a normal network communication, it may remain invisible to security measures."

Twitter: @MikeMiliardHITN
Email the writer: mike.miliard@himssmedia.com

Healthcare IT News is a publication of HIMSS Media.

]]>
Aledade touts cost saving successes of its ACOs http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/aledade-touts-cost-saving-successes-its-acos http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/aledade-touts-cost-saving-successes-its-acos Wed, 02 Oct 2019 10:03:58 CDT mmiliard at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy Healthcare technology company Aledade, which works with groups participating in the Medicare Shared Saving Program, announced its accountable care organizations saved Medicare more than $69 million in 2018, in part by deploying data analytics to improve care and reduce readmission rates. By focusing on proactive patient management and preventive care, the company recorded quality improvement and shared savings results in ACOs across the country, such as the Aledade Louisiana ACO, which reduced emergency department visits by 11 percent and inpatient hospitalizations by 15 percent, saving Medicare $7 million. "Despite continually rising health care costs, we’re not getting our money’s worth," Mat Kendall, executive vice president of provider networks at Aledade, told Healthcare IT News. "That’s why we are working with independent physicians to advance a value-based model of care that can successfully achieve the healthcare triple aim of better care, better health outcomes and lower costs." Aledade provides a suite of technologies including data analytics, clinical and administrative workflow tools and a population health management platform to help its partner practices succeed with accountable care "Some key capabilities we provide include real-time alerts when a patient visits an ER or hospital, insights into patients’ total care continuum, and automated tools to improve prioritization for high-risk or chronic care patients," said Kendall. "We also provide in-person practice transformation specialists to ensure our partners are able to successfully take advantage of these solutions." On average, Aledade ACOs have reduced patient stays in skilled nursing facilities by 17 percent and hospitalizations by six percent, and the physicians practicing in Aledade’s Medicare ACOs earned an average quality score of 96 percent across all of the ACOs in 2018. In another example, this time in Pennsylvania, the Aledade PMA ACO reduced emergency department visits by 17 percent and inpatient hospitalizations by 21 percent, saving Medicare $15.5 million. "With our technology, our partner practices not only have big picture insights into their quality and costs, but can track patient needs such as annual wellness visits, emergency department follow-ups, and transitional care-management appointments in real-time," said Kendall. "Our technology empowers physicians with the insights needed to improve care, pinpoint emerging health risks or cost drivers among patients, and coordinate care management efforts." He said noted Aledade’s ACOs demonstrate that when given the right tools and support, primary care physicians can improve their patients’ health and reduce total costs of care. "As consolidation and other market forces push some doctors out of independent practice, what’s clear to us is that these independent primary care doctors are particularly well-positioned to thrive in the new value-based health care system," Kendall noted.   Nathan Eddy is a healthcare and technology freelancer based in Berlin. Email the writer: nathaneddy@gmail.com Twitter: @dropdeaded209   Focus on Reducing the Cost of Care This month, Healthcare IT News, MobiHealthNews and Healthcare Finance News take a look at what all of this means and how technology, as always, is spurring innovative solutions. Healthcare IT News is a publication of HIMSS Media.

Healthcare technology company Aledade, which works with groups participating in the Medicare Shared Saving Program, announced its accountable care organizations saved Medicare more than $69 million in 2018, in part by deploying data analytics to improve care and reduce readmission rates.

By focusing on proactive patient management and preventive care, the company recorded quality improvement and shared savings results in ACOs across the country, such as the Aledade Louisiana ACO, which reduced emergency department visits by 11 percent and inpatient hospitalizations by 15 percent, saving Medicare $7 million.

"Despite continually rising health care costs, we’re not getting our money’s worth," Mat Kendall, executive vice president of provider networks at Aledade, told Healthcare IT News. "That’s why we are working with independent physicians to advance a value-based model of care that can successfully achieve the healthcare triple aim of better care, better health outcomes and lower costs."

Aledade provides a suite of technologies including data analytics, clinical and administrative workflow tools and a population health management platform to help its partner practices succeed with accountable care

"Some key capabilities we provide include real-time alerts when a patient visits an ER or hospital, insights into patients’ total care continuum, and automated tools to improve prioritization for high-risk or chronic care patients," said Kendall. "We also provide in-person practice transformation specialists to ensure our partners are able to successfully take advantage of these solutions."

On average, Aledade ACOs have reduced patient stays in skilled nursing facilities by 17 percent and hospitalizations by six percent, and the physicians practicing in Aledade’s Medicare ACOs earned an average quality score of 96 percent across all of the ACOs in 2018.

In another example, this time in Pennsylvania, the Aledade PMA ACO reduced emergency department visits by 17 percent and inpatient hospitalizations by 21 percent, saving Medicare $15.5 million.

"With our technology, our partner practices not only have big picture insights into their quality and costs, but can track patient needs such as annual wellness visits, emergency department follow-ups, and transitional care-management appointments in real-time," said Kendall. "Our technology empowers physicians with the insights needed to improve care, pinpoint emerging health risks or cost drivers among patients, and coordinate care management efforts."

He said noted Aledade’s ACOs demonstrate that when given the right tools and support, primary care physicians can improve their patients’ health and reduce total costs of care.

"As consolidation and other market forces push some doctors out of independent practice, what’s clear to us is that these independent primary care doctors are particularly well-positioned to thrive in the new value-based health care system," Kendall noted.

 
Nathan Eddy is a healthcare and technology freelancer based in Berlin.
Email the writer: nathaneddy@gmail.com
Twitter: @dropdeaded209
 

Focus on Reducing the Cost of Care

This month, Healthcare IT News, MobiHealthNews and Healthcare Finance News take a look at what all of this means and how technology, as always, is spurring innovative solutions.

Healthcare IT News is a publication of HIMSS Media.
]]>
Ageing population trend provides massive opportunities for Japan, UK health tech collaboration, report finds http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/europe/ageing-population-trend-provides-massive-opportunities-japan-uk-health-tech http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/europe/ageing-population-trend-provides-massive-opportunities-japan-uk-health-tech Mon, 30 Sep 2019 10:02:19 CDT dyogendra at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy Japan's healthcare system shares a couple of similarities with the UK's. Both countries provide universal healthcare, and both are now grappling with the challenges posed by ageing populations. According to a report published today, that trend is also creating new opportunities for collaboration. WHY IT MATTERS In 2018, citizens aged 65 and over accounted for 28% of Japan’s population, according to figures from the government. This number is estimated to rise to 38% by 2050. The UK is facing a similar issue, with around 21% of the population projected to be aged 65 and over by 2027, compared to around 18% in 2017. In the report, Professor Sudhesh Kumar, dean of the Medical School at the University of Warwick in England, argues that digital technologies could alleviate some of the pressures that healthcare systems around the world face in providing services tailored to the new demand. The UK is now starting to reap the benefits of the implementation of digital solutions that are assisting medical staff and trying to give individuals greater control of their conditions and overall health and wellbeing. Japan is also looking to transform its services with creation of the Next-Generation Healthcare System. Most recently, the government also introduced a law to allow utilisation of anonymously processed medical information by third parties such as research institutions, government agencies and private-sector companies and promote advanced R&D and new industry creation. THE LARGER TREND International collaboration has long been touted as a key factor in advancing the use of digital technology for healthcare, and the two countries’ initiatives can help stakeholders lean on their experiences and pioneer change together, Professor Kumar writes in the report. But he also cautions that the challenge ahead should not be underestimated. “Of course, changing national medical systems has never been easy, but the opportunities and benefits for business, healthcare professionals, and, most important of all, patients, are huge,” Kumar writes. “Digital healthcare has unprecedented potential to resolve some of healthcare’s big problems and increase the longevity of the population," he adds. “The next challenge thereafter will be to design not only healthcare, but a broader society that can accept and manage a 100-year life.”  ON THE RECORD Commenting on the report, Dr Charles Alessi, HIMSS chief clinical officer, said: “In the UK, we have already digitised data on a whole-system basis, and we can learn from the experiences of Japan in adapting to a super-ageing society. Although the population in the UK is not ageing at the same speed as in Japan, there are plenty of areas that we could work on together. Pressures on health services will only increase if we do not take action.” The report, which can be accessed here, is being launched today and introduced at the Healthcare Excellence Through Technology (HETT) event , taking place at the ExCeL centre in London on 1-2 October, of which HIMSS is the official knowledge partner. This report was funded by the government of Japan and published by HIMSS. The content of the report is independent of the government of Japan or HIMSS and is that of the author alone. Healthcare IT News is a HIMSS Media publication.

Japan's healthcare system shares a couple of similarities with the UK's. Both countries provide universal healthcare, and both are now grappling with the challenges posed by ageing populations. According to a report published today, that trend is also creating new opportunities for collaboration.

WHY IT MATTERS

In 2018, citizens aged 65 and over accounted for 28% of Japan’s population, according to figures from the government. This number is estimated to rise to 38% by 2050.

The UK is facing a similar issue, with around 21% of the population projected to be aged 65 and over by 2027, compared to around 18% in 2017.

In the report, Professor Sudhesh Kumar, dean of the Medical School at the University of Warwick in England, argues that digital technologies could alleviate some of the pressures that healthcare systems around the world face in providing services tailored to the new demand.

The UK is now starting to reap the benefits of the implementation of digital solutions that are assisting medical staff and trying to give individuals greater control of their conditions and overall health and wellbeing.

Japan is also looking to transform its services with creation of the Next-Generation Healthcare System. Most recently, the government also introduced a law to allow utilisation of anonymously processed medical information by third parties such as research institutions, government agencies and private-sector companies and promote advanced R&D and new industry creation.

THE LARGER TREND

International collaboration has long been touted as a key factor in advancing the use of digital technology for healthcare, and the two countries’ initiatives can help stakeholders lean on their experiences and pioneer change together, Professor Kumar writes in the report.

But he also cautions that the challenge ahead should not be underestimated.

“Of course, changing national medical systems has never been easy, but the opportunities and benefits for business, healthcare professionals, and, most important of all, patients, are huge,” Kumar writes.

“Digital healthcare has unprecedented potential to resolve some of healthcare’s big problems and increase the longevity of the population," he adds. “The next challenge thereafter will be to design not only healthcare, but a broader society that can accept and manage a 100-year life.” 

ON THE RECORD

Commenting on the report, Dr Charles Alessi, HIMSS chief clinical officer, said: “In the UK, we have already digitised data on a whole-system basis, and we can learn from the experiences of Japan in adapting to a super-ageing society. Although the population in the UK is not ageing at the same speed as in Japan, there are plenty of areas that we could work on together. Pressures on health services will only increase if we do not take action.”

The report, which can be accessed here, is being launched today and introduced at the Healthcare Excellence Through Technology (HETT) event , taking place at the ExCeL centre in London on 1-2 October, of which HIMSS is the official knowledge partner.

This report was funded by the government of Japan and published by HIMSS. The content of the report is independent of the government of Japan or HIMSS and is that of the author alone. Healthcare IT News is a HIMSS Media publication.

]]>
Medicaid may be the driver to reducing costs http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/medicaid-may-be-driver-reducing-costs http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/medicaid-may-be-driver-reducing-costs Fri, 27 Sep 2019 16:26:13 CDT jfinison at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy
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CMS unveils new rules aimed at clinician burden, patient experience http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/cms-unveils-new-rules-aimed-clinician-burden-patient-experience http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/cms-unveils-new-rules-aimed-clinician-burden-patient-experience Thu, 26 Sep 2019 11:08:01 CDT mmiliard at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy As part of its Patients Over Paperwork initiative, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services unveiled its Omnibus Burden Reduction Final Rule on Thursday, aimed at combating clinician burnout. It also finalized a new rule on discharge planning, aimed at patients preparing to move from hospitals into post-acute care settings, requiring hospitals to provide information about PAC provider choices. WHY IT MATTERS Together, the rules seek to improve the experience of providers and patients, respectively, said CMS Administrator Seema Verma on a conference call, and are part of a larger effort to remove "regulatory requirements that stand like a brick wall between patients and their doctors and yet do nothing to advance patient safety or health." The Omnibus Burden Reduction Final Rule takes aim at what CMS estimates is 4.4 million hours spent on paperwork each year, and could enable $8 billion in savings over the next decade while also giving physicians more time to spend with their patients. Among its many provisions, the rule focuses on kidney care, Verma said, finalizing changes to transplant center requirements that give providers greater flexibility to support patients who need organ transplants. Current Medicare transplant center regulations for re-approval are burdensome, she explained – to the point that some transplant programs avoid performing transplants for certain patients. The Omnibus rule will eliminate these requirements, specifically for data submission, increasing the number of organs available for transplantation and helping ensure patients on the transplant waiting list have access to transplants, Verma said. The final rule also will streamline regulations to allow multiple hospitals within a given health system to employ a unified Quality Assessment and Performance Improvement program, according to CMS, making it easier for hospitals to implement best practices and innovations among facilities resulting in quicker improvements in quality of care. "This will ease the strain on small facilities and allow them to trial from the clinical expertise in the larger system," Verma said. Also under the new regulation, orders for X-rays may be transmitted in written form, by telephone or electronically, rather than written and signed, as was previously required.  Additionally, CMS is reducing the frequency of policy reviews and program evaluations that rural health clinics and federally qualified health centers are required to conduct from annually to once every two years. "It's incredibly important for providers to have up-to-date plans in place to deal with unthinkable catastrophic events," Verma said. "However, stakeholders were generally supportive of our proposal to eliminate annual emergency preparedness review requirements." THE LARGER TREND With its Discharge Planning Rule, meanwhile, CMS says it supports patient experience and interoperability goals. The final rule, aimed at patients transitioning to post-acute care settings, requires hospitals to give access to information about PAC provider choices – including performance on important quality measures and resource-use measures such as the prevalence of pressure ulcers number of readmissions back to the hospital. By requiring the seamless exchange of patient information between healthcare settings, and ensuring that a patient’s healthcare information follows them after discharge from a hospital or PAC provider, the rule is meant to boost interoperability, Verma explained. It requires the discharge planning process to focus on a patients' treatment preferences and mandates the right to access their medical records in an electronic format. "Patients who are discharged from care setting need and deserve to know how their transition will be handled," Verma stated. "This rule makes that a reality. It promotes interoperability by requiring that patients have access to their medical records in the format that they request including electronically." ON THE RECORD "In my trips across the country, I’ve heard time and again that unnecessary regulations are increasing costs on providers and they are losing time with patients as a result," said Verma in a statement on the Omnibus Burden Reduction rule. "This final rule brings a common sense approach to reducing regulations and gives providers more time to care for their patients, while reducing administrative costs and improving health outcomes.” As for the discharge planning rule, she called it a "huge step to providing patients with the ability to make healthcare decisions that are right for them, and gives them transparency into what used to be an opaque and confusing process. By demystifying the discharge planning process, we are improving care coordination and making the system work better for patients." Twitter: @MikeMiliardHITN Email the writer: mike.miliard@himssmedia.com Healthcare IT News is a publication of HIMSS Media.

As part of its Patients Over Paperwork initiative, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services unveiled its Omnibus Burden Reduction Final Rule on Thursday, aimed at combating clinician burnout.

It also finalized a new rule on discharge planning, aimed at patients preparing to move from hospitals into post-acute care settings, requiring hospitals to provide information about PAC provider choices.

WHY IT MATTERS
Together, the rules seek to improve the experience of providers and patients, respectively, said CMS Administrator Seema Verma on a conference call, and are part of a larger effort to remove "regulatory requirements that stand like a brick wall between patients and their doctors and yet do nothing to advance patient safety or health."

The Omnibus Burden Reduction Final Rule takes aim at what CMS estimates is 4.4 million hours spent on paperwork each year, and could enable $8 billion in savings over the next decade while also giving physicians more time to spend with their patients.

Among its many provisions, the rule focuses on kidney care, Verma said, finalizing changes to transplant center requirements that give providers greater flexibility to support patients who need organ transplants.

Current Medicare transplant center regulations for re-approval are burdensome, she explained – to the point that some transplant programs avoid performing transplants for certain patients. The Omnibus rule will eliminate these requirements, specifically for data submission, increasing the number of organs available for transplantation and helping ensure patients on the transplant waiting list have access to transplants, Verma said.

The final rule also will streamline regulations to allow multiple hospitals within a given health system to employ a unified Quality Assessment and Performance Improvement program, according to CMS, making it easier for hospitals to implement best practices and innovations among facilities resulting in quicker improvements in quality of care.

"This will ease the strain on small facilities and allow them to trial from the clinical expertise in the larger system," Verma said.

Also under the new regulation, orders for X-rays may be transmitted in written form, by telephone or electronically, rather than written and signed, as was previously required. 

Additionally, CMS is reducing the frequency of policy reviews and program evaluations that rural health clinics and federally qualified health centers are required to conduct from annually to once every two years.

"It's incredibly important for providers to have up-to-date plans in place to deal with unthinkable catastrophic events," Verma said. "However, stakeholders were generally supportive of our proposal to eliminate annual emergency preparedness review requirements."

THE LARGER TREND
With its Discharge Planning Rule, meanwhile, CMS says it supports patient experience and interoperability goals.

The final rule, aimed at patients transitioning to post-acute care settings, requires hospitals to give access to information about PAC provider choices – including performance on important quality measures and resource-use measures such as the prevalence of pressure ulcers number of readmissions back to the hospital.

By requiring the seamless exchange of patient information between healthcare settings, and ensuring that a patient’s healthcare information follows them after discharge from a hospital or PAC provider, the rule is meant to boost interoperability, Verma explained. It requires the discharge planning process to focus on a patients' treatment preferences and mandates the right to access their medical records in an electronic format.

"Patients who are discharged from care setting need and deserve to know how their transition will be handled," Verma stated. "This rule makes that a reality. It promotes interoperability by requiring that patients have access to their medical records in the format that they request including electronically."

ON THE RECORD
"In my trips across the country, I’ve heard time and again that unnecessary regulations are increasing costs on providers and they are losing time with patients as a result," said Verma in a statement on the Omnibus Burden Reduction rule. "This final rule brings a common sense approach to reducing regulations and gives providers more time to care for their patients, while reducing administrative costs and improving health outcomes.”

As for the discharge planning rule, she called it a "huge step to providing patients with the ability to make healthcare decisions that are right for them, and gives them transparency into what used to be an opaque and confusing process. By demystifying the discharge planning process, we are improving care coordination and making the system work better for patients."

Twitter: @MikeMiliardHITN
Email the writer: mike.miliard@himssmedia.com

Healthcare IT News is a publication of HIMSS Media.

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