MedClimate Health News Daily http://medclimate.com/feed en-us Copyright MedClimate, Inc2019 Meningitis changes immune cell makeup in the mouse brain lining http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/meningitis-changes-immune-cell-makeup-mouse-brain-lining http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/meningitis-changes-immune-cell-makeup-mouse-brain-lining Mon, 18 Mar 2019 16:00:00 CDT NIH News Release NIH study finds new cell composition may lead to less effective future response. ]]> Making healthcare changes at the state level http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/video/making-healthcare-changes-state-level http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/video/making-healthcare-changes-state-level Mon, 18 Mar 2019 11:56:13 CDT rickdagley at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy Primary topic: HIMSS19Disable Auto Tagging: Short Headline: Making healthcare changes at the state levelFeatured Decision Content: 
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Partners HealthCare integrates state opioid tool into its EHR http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/partners-healthcare-integrates-state-opioid-tool-its-ehr http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/partners-healthcare-integrates-state-opioid-tool-its-ehr Mon, 18 Mar 2019 09:49:57 CDT tsullivan at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy Partners HealthCare announced integration of the Massachusetts Prescription Awareness Tool (MassPAT), which enables access for providers to help prevent and manage substance use disorders, directly into its electronic health record (EHR) system. MassPAT is an online tool that promotes safe prescribing and dispensing patterns by allowing prescribers and pharmacists to access their patient’s prescriptive history within the past year. WHY IT MATTERS By viewing a patient’s prescription history in MassPAT, a provider can avoid duplication of drug therapies and coordinate care by communicating with other providers to improve clinical outcomes and overall patient health. Integration of MassPAT into Partners’ EHR system, Epic, will further assist prescribers by making a patient’s controlled substance prescription information available to them within the patient’s electronic clinical chart. According to a recent Massachusetts Department of Public Health report, more than two-thirds of state residents who died from an opioid-related overdose between 2011 and 2014 had a legal opioid prescription at some point during that time period. [Opioid crisis: How tech and policy are fighting the epidemic] The report also revealed that non-fatal overdoses in the state increased by close to 200 percent between 2011 and 2015. “A critical piece of helping to prevent over-prescription of opioids is ensuring that providers have an accurate picture of patients’ prescription history,” Massachusetts Commissioner of Public Health Monica Bharel, said in a statement. “MassPAT is an integral part of the Commonwealth’s strategy to support and connect health care providers.” She explained that having the Partners HealthCare system fully integrated and focused on ensuring that its clinicians have access to this tool is an “important advancement” in the state’s collective efforts to curb the opioid epidemic. The state already imposes a seven-day limit on first-time prescriptions of opioids to patients, and mandates all prescribers check the prescription drug monitoring program (PDMP) before prescribing Schedule II or III substances. THE BIGGER TREND Integrating PDMP information, analytics, insights and resources into EHRs and pharmacy management system workflows is a critical step in the progression of optimizing the use of PDMPs. “We’re arming our providers with more robust, point-of-care access to the state’s prescription drug monitoring program to support safe and responsible treatment of pain, and to better manage substance use disorder,” Partners HealthCare chief quality and safety officer Thomas Sequist said in a statement. He explained that by viewing a patient’s prescription information in MassPAT, Partners’ providers are better informed about their patient’s medication use, can avoid duplication of drug therapies and can coordinate care by communicating with other prescribers to improve clinical outcomes. On a national level, an online resource from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid services, made available in February, gives healthcare providers and communities better visibility into controlled substance prescribing patterns. The tool includes data for Medicaid prescribing, enabling geographic comparisons of Medicare Part D opioid prescribing for urban and rural communities. CMS said the update is aimed at helping combat the crisis by better informing local prevention and treatment efforts, especially in underserved and rural communities hardest hit by the opioid epidemic.  Nathan Eddy is a healthcare and technology freelancer based in Berlin. Email the writer: nathaneddy@gmail.com Twitter: @dropdeaded209  Healthcare IT News is a HIMSS Media publication. 

Partners HealthCare announced integration of the Massachusetts Prescription Awareness Tool (MassPAT), which enables access for providers to help prevent and manage substance use disorders, directly into its electronic health record (EHR) system.

MassPAT is an online tool that promotes safe prescribing and dispensing patterns by allowing prescribers and pharmacists to access their patient’s prescriptive history within the past year.

WHY IT MATTERS

By viewing a patient’s prescription history in MassPAT, a provider can avoid duplication of drug therapies and coordinate care by communicating with other providers to improve clinical outcomes and overall patient health.

Integration of MassPAT into Partners’ EHR system, Epic, will further assist prescribers by making a patient’s controlled substance prescription information available to them within the patient’s electronic clinical chart.

According to a recent Massachusetts Department of Public Health report, more than two-thirds of state residents who died from an opioid-related overdose between 2011 and 2014 had a legal opioid prescription at some point during that time period.

[Opioid crisis: How tech and policy are fighting the epidemic]

The report also revealed that non-fatal overdoses in the state increased by close to 200 percent between 2011 and 2015.

“A critical piece of helping to prevent over-prescription of opioids is ensuring that providers have an accurate picture of patients’ prescription history,” Massachusetts Commissioner of Public Health Monica Bharel, said in a statement. “MassPAT is an integral part of the Commonwealth’s strategy to support and connect health care providers.”

She explained that having the Partners HealthCare system fully integrated and focused on ensuring that its clinicians have access to this tool is an “important advancement” in the state’s collective efforts to curb the opioid epidemic.

The state already imposes a seven-day limit on first-time prescriptions of opioids to patients, and mandates all prescribers check the prescription drug monitoring program (PDMP) before prescribing Schedule II or III substances.

THE BIGGER TREND

Integrating PDMP information, analytics, insights and resources into EHRs and pharmacy management system workflows is a critical step in the progression of optimizing the use of PDMPs.

“We’re arming our providers with more robust, point-of-care access to the state’s prescription drug monitoring program to support safe and responsible treatment of pain, and to better manage substance use disorder,” Partners HealthCare chief quality and safety officer Thomas Sequist said in a statement.

He explained that by viewing a patient’s prescription information in MassPAT, Partners’ providers are better informed about their patient’s medication use, can avoid duplication of drug therapies and can coordinate care by communicating with other prescribers to improve clinical outcomes.

On a national level, an online resource from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid services, made available in February, gives healthcare providers and communities better visibility into controlled substance prescribing patterns.

The tool includes data for Medicaid prescribing, enabling geographic comparisons of Medicare Part D opioid prescribing for urban and rural communities. CMS said the update is aimed at helping combat the crisis by better informing local prevention and treatment efforts, especially in underserved and rural communities hardest hit by the opioid epidemic. 

Nathan Eddy is a healthcare and technology freelancer based in Berlin.

Email the writer: nathaneddy@gmail.com

Twitter: @dropdeaded209 

Healthcare IT News is a HIMSS Media publication. 

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Our brains may ripple before remembering http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/our-brains-may-ripple-before-remembering http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/our-brains-may-ripple-before-remembering Fri, 15 Mar 2019 15:30:00 CDT NIH News Release NIH study suggests tiny electrical brain waves may be a hallmark of successful memory retrieval. ]]> Light physical activity linked to lower risk of heart disease in older women http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/light-physical-activity-linked-lower-risk-heart-disease-older-women http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/light-physical-activity-linked-lower-risk-heart-disease-older-women Fri, 15 Mar 2019 15:15:00 CDT NIH News Release Gardening, strolling through a park, or folding clothes might be enough activity to significantly lower the risk. ]]> Surgery no better than medication at preventing serious complications of atrial fibrillation http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/surgery-no-better-medication-preventing-serious-complications-atrial-fibrillation http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/surgery-no-better-medication-preventing-serious-complications-atrial-fibrillation Fri, 15 Mar 2019 15:00:00 CDT NIH News Release The heart procedure improved patients’ quality of life and symptoms. ]]> Sponsored: Keeping health organizations safe from cyberattacks http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/video/sponsored-keeping-health-organizations-safe-cyberattacks http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/video/sponsored-keeping-health-organizations-safe-cyberattacks Thu, 14 Mar 2019 13:45:04 CDT rickdagley at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy Disable Auto Tagging: Short Headline: Sponsored: Keeping health organizations safe from cyberattacksFeatured Decision Content: 
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On World Kidney Day, kidney health is for everyone — including you http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/world-kidney-day-kidney-health-everyone-including-you http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/world-kidney-day-kidney-health-everyone-including-you Thu, 14 Mar 2019 13:45:00 CDT NIH News Release NIH statement from Dr. Griffin P. Rodgers, Director, NIDDK. ]]> NHSX to join up the tech leadership and bridge the worlds of health and tech, Hancock says http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/nhsx-join-tech-leadership-and-bridge-worlds-health-and-tech-hancock-says http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/nhsx-join-tech-leadership-and-bridge-worlds-health-and-tech-hancock-says Thu, 14 Mar 2019 01:45:13 CDT lpostelnicu at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy Health and social care secretary Matt Hancock gave delegates at the Digital Health Technology Show in London yesterday an insight into NHSX, the “latest addition to the NHS family,” a new unit for digital, data and technology that was unveiled earlier this year. Since his appointment in July 2018, Hancock has been on a mission to overhaul the use of technology across the NHS, from releasing a policy paper outlining his tech vision and bringing together a Healthtech Advisory Board to banning fax machines, pagers (for non-emergency communications) and setting up NHSX - and some of these initiatives have drawn both praise and criticism. “One of the things that’s really struck me [in this job],” Hancock said this week, “is how the world of tech and the world of healthcare have two very distinct cultures. In technology, you normally fail fast and you try to fail fast. As an NHS clinician, you’ve got to do all you can to get it right the first time. In technology, you whack out a prototype and collect the evidence as you go along. “In health, anything that isn’t grounded in years of rigorous clinical research is seen as unproven. None of this means that one culture is better than the other, far from it. My point is that there are two cultures, and one of my priorities in this job is to bring those two worlds closer together.” NHSX will therefore bring the tech leadership, at the moment “too diffuse across the system,” into a single decision making point. “But it’s not just about the organogram,” Hancock said. “The other reason [for setting up NHSX] is,, I want to bring the culture, the openness, the productivity, the speed of iteration of the internet to the way we deliver tech in health and care.” This is based on a standards-led approach; in October last year, Hancock outlined plans to introduce minimum technical standards that digital services and IT systems in the NHS will have to meet. “That means local NHS organisations building or buying solutions that meet their needs, whilst also meeting our rigorous and agreed levels of security, data integrity, privacy, interoperability in standards. “This last one is especially important because lives are at risk when our systems can’t talk to each other. So we’re going to rigorously enforce these standards at the point of purchase, but we’ll prescribe the bare minimum so long as they meet the standards,” Hancock said. But that doesn’t mean every interaction between the NHS and suppliers would be “micromanaged” he added, calling this “unwise and totally impractical.” NHSX to 'look at a regulatory sandbox model' The new standards will be designed and developed with patients, clinicians, suppliers and others in an “ongoing" partnership, it was explained. “All of our standards will then be published on the web so anyone who wants to write code for the NHS can see what our needs are, as far as the standards are concerned, before they begin. “But you can’t do user research if you’re not allowed to meet your users, so one of the things I want NHSX to do is look at a regulatory sandbox model that’s been so successful in fintech,” Hancock said.  Meanwhile, in a recent report from MMC Ventures, it was noted while the NHS was becoming increasingly more open to innovation, engaging with the health service was still "challenging" for early stage companies. “If you jump through all the hoops to sell it [a solution] to one trust, you shouldn’t have to repeat the whole process again with another trust just up the road,” the secretary added on Wednesday, vowing to tackle the "not-invented-here syndrome" and support the spread of innovations. Healthcare IT News is a HIMSS Media publication.

Health and social care secretary Matt Hancock gave delegates at the Digital Health Technology Show in London yesterday an insight into NHSX, the “latest addition to the NHS family,” a new unit for digital, data and technology that was unveiled earlier this year.

Since his appointment in July 2018, Hancock has been on a mission to overhaul the use of technology across the NHS, from releasing a policy paper outlining his tech vision and bringing together a Healthtech Advisory Board to banning fax machines, pagers (for non-emergency communications) and setting up NHSX - and some of these initiatives have drawn both praise and criticism.

“One of the things that’s really struck me [in this job],” Hancock said this week, “is how the world of tech and the world of healthcare have two very distinct cultures. In technology, you normally fail fast and you try to fail fast. As an NHS clinician, you’ve got to do all you can to get it right the first time. In technology, you whack out a prototype and collect the evidence as you go along.

“In health, anything that isn’t grounded in years of rigorous clinical research is seen as unproven. None of this means that one culture is better than the other, far from it. My point is that there are two cultures, and one of my priorities in this job is to bring those two worlds closer together.”

NHSX will therefore bring the tech leadership, at the moment “too diffuse across the system,” into a single decision making point.

“But it’s not just about the organogram,” Hancock said. “The other reason [for setting up NHSX] is,, I want to bring the culture, the openness, the productivity, the speed of iteration of the internet to the way we deliver tech in health and care.”

This is based on a standards-led approach; in October last year, Hancock outlined plans to introduce minimum technical standards that digital services and IT systems in the NHS will have to meet.

“That means local NHS organisations building or buying solutions that meet their needs, whilst also meeting our rigorous and agreed levels of security, data integrity, privacy, interoperability in standards.

“This last one is especially important because lives are at risk when our systems can’t talk to each other. So we’re going to rigorously enforce these standards at the point of purchase, but we’ll prescribe the bare minimum so long as they meet the standards,” Hancock said.

But that doesn’t mean every interaction between the NHS and suppliers would be “micromanaged” he added, calling this “unwise and totally impractical.”

NHSX to 'look at a regulatory sandbox model'

The new standards will be designed and developed with patients, clinicians, suppliers and others in an “ongoing" partnership, it was explained.

“All of our standards will then be published on the web so anyone who wants to write code for the NHS can see what our needs are, as far as the standards are concerned, before they begin.

“But you can’t do user research if you’re not allowed to meet your users, so one of the things I want NHSX to do is look at a regulatory sandbox model that’s been so successful in fintech,” Hancock said. 

Meanwhile, in a recent report from MMC Ventures, it was noted while the NHS was becoming increasingly more open to innovation, engaging with the health service was still "challenging" for early stage companies.

“If you jump through all the hoops to sell it [a solution] to one trust, you shouldn’t have to repeat the whole process again with another trust just up the road,” the secretary added on Wednesday, vowing to tackle the "not-invented-here syndrome" and support the spread of innovations.

Healthcare IT News is a HIMSS Media publication.

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Scientists find new approach that shows promise for treating cystic fibrosis http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/scientists-find-new-approach-shows-promise-treating-cystic-fibrosis http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/scientists-find-new-approach-shows-promise-treating-cystic-fibrosis Wed, 13 Mar 2019 18:00:00 CDT NIH News Release NIH-funded discovery uses common antifungal drug to improve lungs’ ability to fight infection. ]]> NIH study reveals differences in brain activity in children with anhedonia http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-study-reveals-differences-brain-activity-children-anhedonia http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-study-reveals-differences-brain-activity-children-anhedonia Wed, 13 Mar 2019 15:00:00 CDT NIH News Release Using fMRI, researchers uncover the neural underpinnings, which could aid development of potential treatments. ]]> Safety-net providers face obstacles to telehealth adoption http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/safety-net-providers-face-obstacles-telehealth-adoption http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/safety-net-providers-face-obstacles-telehealth-adoption Wed, 13 Mar 2019 09:19:12 CDT mmiliard at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy Despite its clear potential to improve access to high-quality care in underserved communities, telehealth is underutilized by safety-net providers due to a range of barriers, according to a new report from the RAND Corporation. The analysis, based on interviews with Medicaid officials from seven states and representatives from 19 Federally Qualified Health Centers in those states, points to insufficient reimbursement as a leading culprit for this lag, in addition to other logistical, policy and operational barriers. WHY IT MATTERS Telehealth can help rural, low-income and vulnerable populations better access health care -- and analyses have shown use of this technology, particularly live video telehealth, is growing among FQHCs. In some cases, telehealth is the only way to bring specialists into remote places. But uptake, maintenance and expansion of telehealth services have been spotty at best. The RAND report, sponsored by the Department of Health and Human Services, seeks to find out why. Interviews with Medicaid and FQHC stakeholders revealed a lack of clarity around state telehealth policies and insufficient reimbursement as top barriers to adoption. Other limiting factors included: infrastructure issues (e.g., insufficient broadband), technology costs, telehealth as a cost center, billing challenges, lack of buy-in among FQHC providers, challenges specific to the patient population (e.g., elderly patients, homeless patients), complexities in adjusting clinic workflow, inadequate supply of specialists to provide telehealth services to FQHC patients, complex and time-consuming logistics around credentialing and licensing, and challenges in working with remote providers. The report suggests several possible solutions that address stakeholder concerns directly as well as areas for further research -- including surveying "the policy environment faced by FQHCs nationwide and explore whether certain policies seem to be associated with greater utilization of telehealth." THE LARGER TREND Given the advantages of using telehealth in underserved communities or to treat vulnerable patients, it is important that state officials and safety-net providers come to a mutual understanding of what's standing in the way of telehealth expansion for these populations -- and modify or clarify policies accordingly. Exciting developments in telemedicine technology must be evaluated in the context of whether they will provide benefits to all users, particularly those with the most need. ON THE RECORD "Telehealth is widely recognized as a tool that can increase access to care and improve quality, and, given that FQHCs are experimenting with telehealth across the United States, it is highly likely that many have confronted challenges and implemented strategies that can benefit others at different stages of implementation," the report authors write. "Studies such as this can support Medicaid programs and FQHCs in the important process of peer learning. Furthermore, our findings highlight the important role of policy, in combination with cultural, organizational, and infrastructure factors, in strengthening the delivery of telehealth services." Deirdre Fulton is communications professional and freelancer based in Maine. On Twitter: @deirdrefulton Healthcare IT News is a HIMSS Media publication. 

Despite its clear potential to improve access to high-quality care in underserved communities, telehealth is underutilized by safety-net providers due to a range of barriers, according to a new report from the RAND Corporation.

The analysis, based on interviews with Medicaid officials from seven states and representatives from 19 Federally Qualified Health Centers in those states, points to insufficient reimbursement as a leading culprit for this lag, in addition to other logistical, policy and operational barriers.

WHY IT MATTERS
Telehealth can help rural, low-income and vulnerable populations better access health care -- and analyses have shown use of this technology, particularly live video telehealth, is growing among FQHCs. In some cases, telehealth is the only way to bring specialists into remote places. But uptake, maintenance and expansion of telehealth services have been spotty at best. The RAND report, sponsored by the Department of Health and Human Services, seeks to find out why.

Interviews with Medicaid and FQHC stakeholders revealed a lack of clarity around state telehealth policies and insufficient reimbursement as top barriers to adoption.

Other limiting factors included: infrastructure issues (e.g., insufficient broadband), technology costs, telehealth as a cost center, billing challenges, lack of buy-in among FQHC providers, challenges specific to the patient population (e.g., elderly patients, homeless patients), complexities in adjusting clinic workflow, inadequate supply of specialists to provide telehealth services to FQHC patients, complex and time-consuming logistics around credentialing and licensing, and challenges in working with remote providers.

The report suggests several possible solutions that address stakeholder concerns directly as well as areas for further research -- including surveying "the policy environment faced by FQHCs nationwide and explore whether certain policies seem to be associated with greater utilization of telehealth."

THE LARGER TREND
Given the advantages of using telehealth in underserved communities or to treat vulnerable patients, it is important that state officials and safety-net providers come to a mutual understanding of what's standing in the way of telehealth expansion for these populations -- and modify or clarify policies accordingly. Exciting developments in telemedicine technology must be evaluated in the context of whether they will provide benefits to all users, particularly those with the most need.

ON THE RECORD
"Telehealth is widely recognized as a tool that can increase access to care and improve quality, and, given that FQHCs are experimenting with telehealth across the United States, it is highly likely that many have confronted challenges and implemented strategies that can benefit others at different stages of implementation," the report authors write.

"Studies such as this can support Medicaid programs and FQHCs in the important process of peer learning. Furthermore, our findings highlight the important role of policy, in combination with cultural, organizational, and infrastructure factors, in strengthening the delivery of telehealth services."

Deirdre Fulton is communications professional and freelancer based in Maine.

On Twitter: @deirdrefulton

Healthcare IT News is a HIMSS Media publication. 

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NIH adds eight Lasker Clinical Research Scholars http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-adds-eight-lasker-clinical-research-scholars http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-adds-eight-lasker-clinical-research-scholars Tue, 12 Mar 2019 17:15:00 CDT NIH News Release These exceptional early stage scientists continue agency commitment to the next generation of biomedical researchers. ]]> Lower costs associated with late-preterm steroid therapy, NIH-funded analysis finds http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/lower-costs-associated-late-preterm-steroid-therapy-nih-funded-analysis-finds http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/lower-costs-associated-late-preterm-steroid-therapy-nih-funded-analysis-finds Tue, 12 Mar 2019 13:15:00 CDT NIH News Release Study adds evidence to benefits of treatment for women at risk of delivery between 34th and 36th weeks of pregnancy ]]> Mergers and acquisitions not leading to promised EHR integration http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/mergers-and-acquisitions-not-leading-promised-ehr-integration http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/mergers-and-acquisitions-not-leading-promised-ehr-integration Tue, 12 Mar 2019 09:38:49 CDT at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com A new report in Health Affairs looks at the success rate of hospital IT system integration, post-consolidation. NIH study shows many preteens screen positive for suicide risk during ER visits http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-study-shows-many-preteens-screen-positive-suicide-risk-during-er-visits http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-study-shows-many-preteens-screen-positive-suicide-risk-during-er-visits Mon, 11 Mar 2019 13:45:00 CDT NIH News Release Findings highlight the importance of screening kids as young as 10 for suicide risk in emergency settings. ]]> WHO unveils plans to create a Department of Digital Health http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/who-unveils-plans-create-department-digital-health http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/who-unveils-plans-create-department-digital-health Fri, 08 Mar 2019 10:26:12 CST at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com The new suite of reforms announced also include the development of a new role of chief scientist and a Data, Analytics and Delivery division. WHO unveils plans to create a Department of Digital Health http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/who-unveils-plans-create-department-digital-health http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/who-unveils-plans-create-department-digital-health Fri, 08 Mar 2019 10:26:12 CST lpostelnicu at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy WHO has revealed this week plans to create a Department of Digital Health overseen by the division of the chief scientist, a new role, along with a raft of reforms that it says are the “most wide-ranging in the organization’s history”. The Department of Digital Health will, according to WHO, harness “the power of digital health and innovation by supporting countries to assess, integrate, regulate and maximize the opportunities of digital technologies and artificial intelligence”. The announcement follows a recent event organised in February this year by the WHO regional office for Europe, which brought together a suite of stakeholders to create a network that would advance the digitisation of healthcare systems in the region. Former WHO regional director for Europe Zsuzsanna Jakab warned at the time at European countries should “move beyond an understanding of the promise of digital health” and speed up implementation. It was announced earlier this week that Jakab had been appointed as WHO deputy director general in the new changes. Other reforms include the development of a new Data, Analytics and Delivery division to “significantly enhance the collection, storage, analysis and usage of data to drive policy change in countries”. WHO said the measures were drafted by its Global Policy Group after an “extensive period of consultation” with staff. “This is a historic moment for WHO. For the first time, the heads of the 7 major offices have worked together to identify the changes we need to make at all three levels of WHO – headquarters, regional offices and country offices – to transform this great organization and make us more effective and efficient,” director general Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said in a speech. Dr Takeshi Kasai, WHO regional director for the Western Pacific, added that there was a need to build a “stronger, more systematic” method to help countries leverage the use of digital technologies and innovation to “support their national priorities”. “Around the world, artificial intelligence and digital health are changing the way health care is delivered right across the continuum of care, for promotion, prevention, treatment, rehabilitation and palliative care. There are many opportunities to take, challenges to overcome and policy decisions to make, to maximize the incredible opportunity of digital tools for health. “WHO has a unique role to play in advising countries on how to maximize the opportunities of digital technologies, while avoiding the pitfalls with appropriate regulation," Dr Kasai added.

WHO has revealed this week plans to create a Department of Digital Health overseen by the division of the chief scientist, a new role, along with a raft of reforms that it says are the “most wide-ranging in the organization’s history”.

The Department of Digital Health will, according to WHO, harness “the power of digital health and innovation by supporting countries to assess, integrate, regulate and maximize the opportunities of digital technologies and artificial intelligence”.

The announcement follows a recent event organised in February this year by the WHO regional office for Europe, which brought together a suite of stakeholders to create a network that would advance the digitisation of healthcare systems in the region.

Former WHO regional director for Europe Zsuzsanna Jakab warned at the time at European countries should “move beyond an understanding of the promise of digital health” and speed up implementation. It was announced earlier this week that Jakab had been appointed as WHO deputy director general in the new changes.

Other reforms include the development of a new Data, Analytics and Delivery division to “significantly enhance the collection, storage, analysis and usage of data to drive policy change in countries”.

WHO said the measures were drafted by its Global Policy Group after an “extensive period of consultation” with staff.

“This is a historic moment for WHO. For the first time, the heads of the 7 major offices have worked together to identify the changes we need to make at all three levels of WHO – headquarters, regional offices and country offices – to transform this great organization and make us more effective and efficient,” director general Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said in a speech.

Dr Takeshi Kasai, WHO regional director for the Western Pacific, added that there was a need to build a “stronger, more systematic” method to help countries leverage the use of digital technologies and innovation to “support their national priorities”.

“Around the world, artificial intelligence and digital health are changing the way health care is delivered right across the continuum of care, for promotion, prevention, treatment, rehabilitation and palliative care. There are many opportunities to take, challenges to overcome and policy decisions to make, to maximize the incredible opportunity of digital tools for health.

“WHO has a unique role to play in advising countries on how to maximize the opportunities of digital technologies, while avoiding the pitfalls with appropriate regulation," Dr Kasai added.

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RSA 2019 top takeaways: AI, diversity and the need for a new cybersecurity culture http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/rsa-2019-top-takeaways-ai-diversity-and-need-new-cybersecurity-culture http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/rsa-2019-top-takeaways-ai-diversity-and-need-new-cybersecurity-culture Fri, 08 Mar 2019 08:15:07 CST tsullivan at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy SAN FRANCISCO — RSA 2019 kicked off here with bold plans for the future including unleashing new innovation to improve humanity, reclaiming the internet for social progress and improving efficiencies to eliminate famine and poverty — all of which, of course, are predicated on the foundational element of solid information security. That was the grand and future-looking vision, of course, rather than what’s actually happening in the here-and-now. I came away from the conference with a clear sense that infosec as an industry needs to embrace emerging technologies with a hearty dose of skepticism, diversify its workforce for existential reasons and, what’s more, create a new culture that both embraces a wider range of ideas and empowers security professionals to more effectively respond with in live crises, be those cyberattacks, natural disasters, or unforeseen incidents. SANS Institute officials, for instance, outlined new attack vectors: DNSpionage, cloud-based personalized attacks, domain fronting, and more CPU flaws and offered advice about how to protect against those. Many vendors showed off new technologies and artificial intelligence and machine learning, of course, were all the rage. Amid all the hype, however, some pointed questions arose. When we talk about AI for cybersecurity, what are we really talking about? Are we evaluating AI objectively enough relative to inherent bias? Since hackers and cybercriminals have access to the same AI and data as well-meaning entities, will the technology ultimately make us safer or endanger the world? Obviously, those questions did not all get answered but it became clear that AI alone won’t secure all our data and the human element is even more important than technology. And that is both a major challenge today and a great opportunity to bolster security. The challenge of the human element is that both IT and infosec are facing talent shortages. One estimate is a shortfall of 3 million information security professionals is coming across all sectors, including but not limited to healthcare. At the same time, the security industry has a burnout problem that’s only going to get worse. Whereas in healthcare the word burnout evokes pictures of clinicians, nurses, doctors, the problem is also driving security pros into various states of exhaustion, cynicism and a perceived lack of self-efficacy that erodes an employee’s sense of their own value.   Burnout and the talent shortage are also opening up a need to diversify cybersecurity teams and not just for feel good sentiments but also for legitimate business reasons. One statistic presented during a keynote, if at all close to true, says a lot: Diverse teams make better decisions 87 percent of the time. Survival is another. With so many open jobs, executives will essentially have to seek new ways to recruit and retain workers of diverse backgrounds. The diversity and inclusion discourse also took a twist to include not just individuals but ideas because often those come from surprising places and people.  Seeking ideas outside the information security team, naturally, will require an entirely fresh culture that includes new ways of thinking and operating by empowering people rather than inhibiting them with rigid protocols and policies that get in the way of making decisions in the chaotic midst of a cyberattack or data breach. Such culture change will also take root outside the security team. Indeed, the need to secure IoT devices is giving rise to the need for IT, security and OT departments to work together in a distinct change from the infosec executives stepping in and mandating policies the rest of the organization must adhere to with no exceptions. As I noted, RSA kicked off with a visionary glance at a better future based on strong security posture. While that future remains on the distant horizon, the starting point: Organizations across industries and including government must join forces because the cybersecurity threat is bigger than any company, health system or federal agency. Twitter: @SullyHIT Email the writer: tom.sullivan@himssmedia.com Healthcare IT News is a HIMSS Media publication. RSA 2019 Hottest news and views from the premier cybersecurity conference. See our full coverage right here.

SAN FRANCISCO — RSA 2019 kicked off here with bold plans for the future including unleashing new innovation to improve humanity, reclaiming the internet for social progress and improving efficiencies to eliminate famine and poverty — all of which, of course, are predicated on the foundational element of solid information security.

That was the grand and future-looking vision, of course, rather than what’s actually happening in the here-and-now.

I came away from the conference with a clear sense that infosec as an industry needs to embrace emerging technologies with a hearty dose of skepticism, diversify its workforce for existential reasons and, what’s more, create a new culture that both embraces a wider range of ideas and empowers security professionals to more effectively respond with in live crises, be those cyberattacks, natural disasters, or unforeseen incidents.

SANS Institute officials, for instance, outlined new attack vectors: DNSpionage, cloud-based personalized attacks, domain fronting, and more CPU flaws and offered advice about how to protect against those.

Many vendors showed off new technologies and artificial intelligence and machine learning, of course, were all the rage. Amid all the hype, however, some pointed questions arose. When we talk about AI for cybersecurity, what are we really talking about? Are we evaluating AI objectively enough relative to inherent bias? Since hackers and cybercriminals have access to the same AI and data as well-meaning entities, will the technology ultimately make us safer or endanger the world?

Obviously, those questions did not all get answered but it became clear that AI alone won’t secure all our data and the human element is even more important than technology. And that is both a major challenge today and a great opportunity to bolster security.

The challenge of the human element is that both IT and infosec are facing talent shortages. One estimate is a shortfall of 3 million information security professionals is coming across all sectors, including but not limited to healthcare.

At the same time, the security industry has a burnout problem that’s only going to get worse. Whereas in healthcare the word burnout evokes pictures of clinicians, nurses, doctors, the problem is also driving security pros into various states of exhaustion, cynicism and a perceived lack of self-efficacy that erodes an employee’s sense of their own value.  

Burnout and the talent shortage are also opening up a need to diversify cybersecurity teams and not just for feel good sentiments but also for legitimate business reasons. One statistic presented during a keynote, if at all close to true, says a lot: Diverse teams make better decisions 87 percent of the time.

Survival is another. With so many open jobs, executives will essentially have to seek new ways to recruit and retain workers of diverse backgrounds. The diversity and inclusion discourse also took a twist to include not just individuals but ideas because often those come from surprising places and people. 

Seeking ideas outside the information security team, naturally, will require an entirely fresh culture that includes new ways of thinking and operating by empowering people rather than inhibiting them with rigid protocols and policies that get in the way of making decisions in the chaotic midst of a cyberattack or data breach.

Such culture change will also take root outside the security team. Indeed, the need to secure IoT devices is giving rise to the need for IT, security and OT departments to work together in a distinct change from the infosec executives stepping in and mandating policies the rest of the organization must adhere to with no exceptions.

As I noted, RSA kicked off with a visionary glance at a better future based on strong security posture. While that future remains on the distant horizon, the starting point: Organizations across industries and including government must join forces because the cybersecurity threat is bigger than any company, health system or federal agency.

Twitter: @SullyHIT
Email the writer: tom.sullivan@himssmedia.com

Healthcare IT News is a HIMSS Media publication.

RSA 2019

Hottest news and views from the premier cybersecurity conference. See our full coverage right here.

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Partnering with the FBI cybersecurity team to tackle infosec threats http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/video/partnering-fbi-cybersecurity-team-tackle-infosec-threats http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/video/partnering-fbi-cybersecurity-team-tackle-infosec-threats Thu, 07 Mar 2019 12:14:57 CST rickdagley at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy RSA 2019 Hottest news and views from the premier cybersecurity conference. See our full coverage right here. Primary topic: Privacy & SecurityDisable Auto Tagging: Short Headline: Partnering with the FBI cybersecurity team to tackle infosec threatsFeatured Decision Content: 

RSA 2019

Hottest news and views from the premier cybersecurity conference. See our full coverage right here.

Primary topic: 
Disable Auto Tagging: 
Short Headline: 
Partnering with the FBI cybersecurity team to tackle infosec threats
Featured Decision Content: 
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Scott Gottlieb lauded for tough stance on tobacco and vaping, approval of new drugs at FDA http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/scott-gottlieb-lauded-tough-stance-tobacco-and-vaping-approval-new-drugs-fda http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/scott-gottlieb-lauded-tough-stance-tobacco-and-vaping-approval-new-drugs-fda Wed, 06 Mar 2019 13:12:54 CST jfinison at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy
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NIH awards Virginia health orgs $23M for precision med, pop health innovation http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/nih-awards-virginia-health-orgs-23m-precision-med-pop-health-innovation http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/nih-awards-virginia-health-orgs-23m-precision-med-pop-health-innovation Wed, 06 Mar 2019 09:56:21 CST mmiliard at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy The integrated Translational Health Research Institute of Virginia, or iTHRIV, has received a $23 million grant from the National Institutes of Health. The five-year grant will be used to accelerate the development of new treatments and cures through data science expertise. WHY IT MATTERS The iTHRIV consortium includes the University of Virginia, Inova Health System, Virginia Tech and Carilion Clinic, and is the first cross-state effort in Virginia to integrate clinical and translational research resources. Affiliates of the iTHRIV include the Center for Open Science, a non-profit technology organization based in Charlottesville, Virginia, and UVA's Licensing & Ventures Group. "This grant is an indication of the innovative research happening right here in Virginia," Carilion President and CEO Nancy Howell Agee said in a statement, calling it an investment to improve lives across the state. Translational research – the process of applying knowledge from basic biology and clinical trials to improve health outcomes for patients – is a main focus point for iTHRIV, which brings together areas of expertise, including clinical research and data science. It uses an integrated team of experts focused on translating useful information from laboratories to doctors' offices and hospitals, while a focus on multidisciplinary collaborations helps develop a culture of creating knowledge to answer complex medical questions. The Clinical and Translational Science Awards program, which now includes iTHRIV, is designed to help research teams, including scientists, patient advocacy organizations and community members, to tackle significant scientific and operational problems in clinical and translational research that no one team can overcome. The program's goals are to train and nurture the clinical and translational science workforce and engage patients and communities in all phases of the translational process. The awards program is supported by the NIH's National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, a network includes approximately 60 institutions around the country. The grant program is also designed to promote the integration of special and underserved populations in translational research, as well as advance the use of informatics and data science and innovate processes to improve the quality and efficiency of translational research. THE LARGER TREND Various members of the iTHRIV consortium have been making big progress on various innovations for improved and more personalized care delivery. Carilion Clinic has been harnessing its analytics program to make better use of social determinants of health, for instance. And UVA has recently rolled out new data visualization and agile framework strategies to boost the patient experience there. And NIH, of course, has been pursuing precision medicine advances on other fronts, especially with its massive All of Us Research Program. ON THE RECORD "Translational research is essential to the development of new medical treatments that address currently unmet patient needs," Dr. Mickey Kim, senior vice president of research and commercialization and the head of Inova Translational Medicine Institute, said in a statement. He noted that by nurturing the translational research enterprise in Virginia, the grant would help iTHRV researchers work together more effectively to "make tomorrow's breakthroughs." "We are extremely excited about the potential of this statewide collaboration to accelerate the development of new treatments and improve the health of people across the commonwealth and beyond," Richard Shannon, UVA's executive vice president for health affairs, said in a statement. Nathan Eddy is a healthcare and technology freelancer based in Berlin. Email the writer: nathaneddy@gmail.com Twitter: @dropdeaded209

The integrated Translational Health Research Institute of Virginia, or iTHRIV, has received a $23 million grant from the National Institutes of Health. The five-year grant will be used to accelerate the development of new treatments and cures through data science expertise.

WHY IT MATTERS
The iTHRIV consortium includes the University of Virginia, Inova Health System, Virginia Tech and Carilion Clinic, and is the first cross-state effort in Virginia to integrate clinical and translational research resources.

Affiliates of the iTHRIV include the Center for Open Science, a non-profit technology organization based in Charlottesville, Virginia, and UVA's Licensing & Ventures Group.

"This grant is an indication of the innovative research happening right here in Virginia," Carilion President and CEO Nancy Howell Agee said in a statement, calling it an investment to improve lives across the state.

Translational research – the process of applying knowledge from basic biology and clinical trials to improve health outcomes for patients – is a main focus point for iTHRIV, which brings together areas of expertise, including clinical research and data science.

It uses an integrated team of experts focused on translating useful information from laboratories to doctors' offices and hospitals, while a focus on multidisciplinary collaborations helps develop a culture of creating knowledge to answer complex medical questions.

The Clinical and Translational Science Awards program, which now includes iTHRIV, is designed to help research teams, including scientists, patient advocacy organizations and community members, to tackle significant scientific and operational problems in clinical and translational research that no one team can overcome.

The program's goals are to train and nurture the clinical and translational science workforce and engage patients and communities in all phases of the translational process.

The awards program is supported by the NIH's National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, a network includes approximately 60 institutions around the country.

The grant program is also designed to promote the integration of special and underserved populations in translational research, as well as advance the use of informatics and data science and innovate processes to improve the quality and efficiency of translational research.

THE LARGER TREND
Various members of the iTHRIV consortium have been making big progress on various innovations for improved and more personalized care delivery.

Carilion Clinic has been harnessing its analytics program to make better use of social determinants of health, for instance. And UVA has recently rolled out new data visualization and agile framework strategies to boost the patient experience there.

And NIH, of course, has been pursuing precision medicine advances on other fronts, especially with its massive All of Us Research Program.

ON THE RECORD
"Translational research is essential to the development of new medical treatments that address currently unmet patient needs," Dr. Mickey Kim, senior vice president of research and commercialization and the head of Inova Translational Medicine Institute, said in a statement.

He noted that by nurturing the translational research enterprise in Virginia, the grant would help iTHRV researchers work together more effectively to "make tomorrow's breakthroughs."

"We are extremely excited about the potential of this statewide collaboration to accelerate the development of new treatments and improve the health of people across the commonwealth and beyond," Richard Shannon, UVA's executive vice president for health affairs, said in a statement.

Nathan Eddy is a healthcare and technology freelancer based in Berlin.

Email the writer: nathaneddy@gmail.com

Twitter: @dropdeaded209

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EHR challenges, information overload often lead to staff workarounds http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/ehr-challenges-information-overload-often-lead-staff-workarounds http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/ehr-challenges-information-overload-often-lead-staff-workarounds Tue, 05 Mar 2019 10:22:00 CST at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com A new survey of hospital clinicians finds that care teams "pervasively" use electronic health record workarounds at critical points of care. An Epic EHR rollout spurs one health system to dig into data governance http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/epic-ehr-rollout-spurs-one-health-system-dig-data-governance http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/epic-ehr-rollout-spurs-one-health-system-dig-data-governance Tue, 26 Feb 2019 13:32:22 CST at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com After two governance attempts that stalled, the University of Vermont Health Network finally finds success after bringing in a tech and consulting firm for some unbiased, third-party help. Universal healthcare act in the Philippines signed into law by President Duterte http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/universal-healthcare-act-philippines-signed-law-president-duterte http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/universal-healthcare-act-philippines-signed-law-president-duterte Tue, 26 Feb 2019 00:23:29 CST at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com Last Wednesday (February 20), President Rodrigo R. Duterte of the Philippines officially signed the Universal Health Care (UHC) Act into law, which guarantees equitable access to quality and affordable healthcare services for all Filipinos. It will also automatically enroll Filipino citizens into the National Health Insurance Program and expand PhilHealth coverage to include free medical consultations and laboratory tests. Microsoft, Philips partner on augmented reality for surgery http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/microsoft-philips-partner-augmented-reality-surgery http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/microsoft-philips-partner-augmented-reality-surgery Mon, 25 Feb 2019 10:44:18 CST at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com The tech uses Microsoft HoloLens 2 and Philips' Azurion platform for minimally invasive therapies. All-in-one mobile devices increase nurse satisfaction at Truman Medical http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/all-one-mobile-devices-increase-nurse-satisfaction-truman-medical http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/all-one-mobile-devices-increase-nurse-satisfaction-truman-medical Thu, 21 Feb 2019 12:27:53 CST at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com The provider organization replaced phones, pagers, medication scanners, cameras and computers with a single mobile computer, and a system from Cerner. HIMSS19: Top takeaways from the health IT show http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/himss19-top-takeaways-health-it-show http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/himss19-top-takeaways-health-it-show Wed, 20 Feb 2019 08:37:36 CST at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com Info-blocking ruled the day, while APIs, FHIR, artificial intelligence and virtual reality were also prominent themes at this year’s Global Conference. Kaiser Permanente to open medical school in 2020 with focuses on data, virtual reality http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/kaiser-permanente-open-medical-school-2020-focuses-data-virtual-reality http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/kaiser-permanente-open-medical-school-2020-focuses-data-virtual-reality Tue, 19 Feb 2019 10:20:56 CST at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com The school is designed to teach students how to use technology to deliver high-quality care in new and collaborative ways. Facebook charged with misleading users on health data visibility http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/facebook-charged-misleading-users-health-data-visibility http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/facebook-charged-misleading-users-health-data-visibility Mon, 18 Feb 2019 11:56:08 CST at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com A report says the social network’s handling of personal health information put its users' health at risk.  Physicians should think twice about promoting medical credit cards to their patients http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/finance-experts-warn-medical-credit-cards?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/finance-experts-warn-medical-credit-cards?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Tue, 20 Feb 2018 10:15:20 CST Joanne Finnegan at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Consumers use credit cards to pay for everything (including the kitchen sink), and the latest trend has people using medical credit cards to pay for healthcare services. But financial experts are warning practices about the pitfalls of promoting so-called medical credit cards to their patients, says the Healthcare Financial Management Association. Trump administration issues proposed rule to expand short-term insurance plans http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/trump-administration-short-term-insurance-rule?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/trump-administration-short-term-insurance-rule?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Tue, 20 Feb 2018 09:56:31 CST Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare A proposed rule issued by three federal agencies on Tuesday would expand limits for short-term health insurance plans from three months to 12 months. CMS's Seema Verma dismissed concerns that the policy shift would destabilize the individual market by siphoning off healthy individuals, arguing the change will have "virtually no impact" on ACA premiums. Under Trump, HHS rolls back policies aimed at protecting LGBT rights http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/trump-hhs-lgbt-rights-alex-azar?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/trump-hhs-lgbt-rights-alex-azar?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Tue, 20 Feb 2018 09:31:52 CST Leslie Small at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Though President Donald Trump promised to support LGBT causes during the 2016 campaign, under his watch the Department of Health and Human Services had rolled back several initiatives aimed at protecting the rights of that population. New HHS Secretary Alex Azar could take the department in a different direction. Study: Community navigators can reduce the high cost of 'superusers' in hospital settings http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/patient-engagement/community-navigators-superusers-hospital-visits-decrease?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/patient-engagement/community-navigators-superusers-hospital-visits-decrease?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Tue, 20 Feb 2018 09:08:46 CST Paige Minemyer at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare "Superusers," those costly patients who utilize high levels of hospital care, are a significant burden on the healthcare system. But a new study suggests that pairing them with community navigators can reduce their use of hospital services. Researchers in Tennessee found that the intervention reduced their healthcare encounters by 39%. Patients lack information about imaging exams, study finds http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/patients-lack-information-imaging-exams-radiology-study-yale?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/patients-lack-information-imaging-exams-radiology-study-yale?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Sat, 17 Feb 2018 20:14:46 CST Joanne Finnegan at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Doctors can do a better job providing patients with information before they go for an imaging exam, a new study found. One in five patients shows up for an imaging exam without any information about the test they are about to undergo, according to the study published in Radiology. Most for-profit hospitals will benefit from U.S. tax overhaul, but 2 big-name providers stand to gain the most http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/most-for-profit-hospitals-will-benefit-from-us-tax-overhaul-but-two-big-name-providers?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/most-for-profit-hospitals-will-benefit-from-us-tax-overhaul-but-two-big-name-providers?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 16 Feb 2018 15:23:18 CST Ilene MacDonald at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Most for-profit hospitals stand to gain from the changes to the U.S. tax laws, according to a new Moody’s Investors Service report. But HCA Healthcare and Universal Health Service will be the biggest beneficiaries and could see their operating cash flows go up by 10% or more. North Carolina attorney general seeks more details on Atrium Health-UNC Health Care merger  http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/atrium-health-university-north-carolina-merger-ag-wants-details?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/atrium-health-university-north-carolina-merger-ag-wants-details?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 16 Feb 2018 15:12:13 CST Paige Minemyer at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare North Carolina's attorney general is asking Atrium Health and UNC Health Care to provide more information on their merger plans. AG Josh Stein said he intends to ensure that the planned merger doesn't increase patient costs. 5 medical conditions that cost more than $15K per hospital stay http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/5-medical-conditions-cost-more-than-15k-per-hospital-stay?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/5-medical-conditions-cost-more-than-15k-per-hospital-stay?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 16 Feb 2018 14:01:34 CST Ilene MacDonald at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Heart valve disorders lead the list of the most expensive medical conditions with the highest average cost per inpatient stay, according to an analysis by Business Insider based on 2016 data from Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project. Heart valve disorders, on average, cost $41,878 per stay, the analysis found. Anthem alters controversial ER coverage policies http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/anthem-er-coverage-policy-changes?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/anthem-er-coverage-policy-changes?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 16 Feb 2018 11:50:13 CST Leslie Small at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Seeking to address mounting concerns from providers and other stakeholders, Anthem has made changes to policies it previously rolled out that restrict coverage for emergency room visits. The insurer has implemented a series of “always pay” exceptions for certain circumstances, like when the patient received any kind of surgery or an MRI or CT scan. VA head Shulkin to reimburse disputed European travel expenses, but Dems call for hearing over controversy http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/healthcare/va-head-s-european-trip-drama-continues-shulkin-will-reimburse-disputed-expenses-but-won?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/healthcare/va-head-s-european-trip-drama-continues-shulkin-will-reimburse-disputed-expenses-but-won?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 16 Feb 2018 10:30:06 CST Ilene MacDonald at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Veterans Affairs Secretary David Shulkin, M.D., says he will reimburse travel expenses that were the subject of an internal investigation into a trip he took to Europe this summer, but that may not put an end to the controversy. One lawmaker has called for Shulkin’s resignation, and four Democrats have requested a hearing about the trip.