MedClimate Health News Daily http://medclimate.com/feed en-us Copyright MedClimate, Inc2020 Atrium Health to drop Cerner, move to Epic EHR system http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/atrium-health-drop-cerner-move-epic-ehr-system http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/atrium-health-drop-cerner-move-epic-ehr-system Fri, 21 Feb 2020 12:19:20 CST at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com It's the second major health system this month to announce it's making the switch. Is synthetic data the key to healthcare clinical and business intelligence? http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/synthetic-data-key-healthcare-clinical-and-business-intelligence http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/synthetic-data-key-healthcare-clinical-and-business-intelligence Fri, 21 Feb 2020 10:38:48 CST at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com At HIMSS20, Robert Lieberthal, an economist at The MITRE Corporation, will offer a deep dive into synthetic data, showing how it can help health systems achieve cost efficiencies. How AI and machine learning are transforming clinical decision support http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/how-ai-and-machine-learning-are-transforming-clinical-decision-support http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/how-ai-and-machine-learning-are-transforming-clinical-decision-support Fri, 21 Feb 2020 09:20:00 CST at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com At HIMSS20, Mayo Clinic Platform President Dr. John Halamka and medical journalist Paul Cerrato will explore emerging technologies that are reshaping screening, diagnosis and treatment. Why patients and providers need a model patient data use agreement http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/why-patients-and-providers-need-model-patient-data-use-agreement http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/why-patients-and-providers-need-model-patient-data-use-agreement Thu, 20 Feb 2020 11:24:15 CST at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com The health and wellness data group lead at The MITRE Corporation offers a sneak preview of her HIMSS20 session on the topic. Health Catalyst acquires Able Health for $27 million http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/health-catalyst-acquires-able-health-27-million http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/health-catalyst-acquires-able-health-27-million Thu, 20 Feb 2020 10:52:05 CST at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com The company says the acquisition will bolster the its existing quality and regulatory measures capabilities, due in part to Able Health SaaS application, which automates measures reporting. At HIMSS20, Innovaccer will unveil unified patient record for care team collaboration http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/himss20-innovaccer-will-unveil-unified-patient-record-care-team-collaboration http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/himss20-innovaccer-will-unveil-unified-patient-record-care-team-collaboration Thu, 20 Feb 2020 10:26:56 CST at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com The interface of this new proprietary model will enable the collection of data from the full range of a patient’s healthcare experiences and provide a complete view of that patient for a care team, the company says. University College London Hospitals CNIO set to join NHSX http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/europe/university-college-london-hospitals-cnio-set-join-nhsx http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/europe/university-college-london-hospitals-cnio-set-join-nhsx Thu, 20 Feb 2020 07:42:40 CST at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com Natasha Phillips will take on the new role this April. Maternal obesity linked to ADHD and behavioral problems in children, NIH study suggests http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/maternal-obesity-linked-adhd-behavioral-problems-children-nih-study-suggests http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/maternal-obesity-linked-adhd-behavioral-problems-children-nih-study-suggests Wed, 19 Feb 2020 18:00:00 CST NIH News Release Women who were obese before pregnancy were approximately twice as likely to report that their child had ADHD or symptoms of hyperactivity. ]]> AI success depends on good datasets, strategic alignment http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/ai-success-depends-good-datasets-strategic-alignment http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/ai-success-depends-good-datasets-strategic-alignment Wed, 19 Feb 2020 14:06:12 CST at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com At HIMSS20, two experts from Optum will offer tips and best practices for clinical and operational machine learning deployments. RTLS tech, and changes learned from it, save hospital $1 million per year http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/rtls-tech-and-changes-learned-it-save-hospital-1-million-year http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/rtls-tech-and-changes-learned-it-save-hospital-1-million-year Wed, 19 Feb 2020 10:49:56 CST at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com Adventist Health White Memorial overhauls operating room processes with real-time location system and RFID tags, trimming costs and improving patient satisfaction. NIH study supports new approach for treating cerebral malaria http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-study-supports-new-approach-treating-cerebral-malaria http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-study-supports-new-approach-treating-cerebral-malaria Tue, 18 Feb 2020 15:00:00 CST NIH News Release Findings suggest drugs targeting immune cells may help treat deadly disease mainly affecting children. ]]> NIH-funded study links natural sugars in breastmilk to early childhood height and weight http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-funded-study-links-natural-sugars-breastmilk-early-childhood-height-weight http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-funded-study-links-natural-sugars-breastmilk-early-childhood-height-weight Tue, 18 Feb 2020 14:30:00 CST NIH News Release The study also suggested that maternal obesity may affect sugar composition in breastmilk. ]]> Dutch minister pledges €75 million to make medical data available to patients online http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/europe/dutch-minister-pledges-75-million-make-medical-data-available-patients-online http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/europe/dutch-minister-pledges-75-million-make-medical-data-available-patients-online Tue, 18 Feb 2020 10:04:04 CST dyogendra at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy Hospital patients in the Netherlands will soon be able to view and share medical data about themselves online, following a bill to be presented later this year. Under the initiative announced by Dutch minister for medical care Bruno Bruins, hospitals and health clinics will receive €75 million to help meet the new legal obligation to make medical data available. The bill will also require hospitals and clinics to digitally exchange data with each other. Under the plans, hospitals and other medical specialist care organisations sharing data will be required meet the safety requirements of MedMij, the Dutch technical framework for personal health environments. The programme will be implemented by the Dutch Association for Hospitals (NVZ), the Dutch Federation of University Medical Centres (NFU) and the Netherlands Independent Clinics (ZKN). WHY IT MATTERS  Bruins said that making patient data available online will save time, prevent medical errors and mean that patients do not have to repeat their stories multiple times when seeing different medical professionals. ICT specialists from the Ministry of Health, Welfare and Sport will monitor whether the data exchange between health institutions takes place digitally. THE LARGER CONTEXT  In a recent survey from HIMSS Analytics, the Netherlands was identified as one of the countries driving adoption of digital technology in European healthcare, alongside Estonia and the Nordics. The country’s Acceleration Programme for Patient and Professional Information Exchange (VIPP) is helping to prepare healthcare organisations for the digital exchange of medical data and the government has made €400 million available in total towards digitalisation.   One example of digitally enhanced patient care in the Netherlands is the ambulatory heart failure telemonitoring initiative, which the Ministry of Health, Welfare and Sport, says has led to a considerable reduction in acute care visits, ambulance calls and hospital stays. ON THE RECORD  Bruins said: “With this €75 million grant I want to make it possible for patients to take control of their own medical data. Digital data exchange also prevents avoidable errors and leaves doctors more time, because they don't have to retype data. “I find it impossible at a time when we can see each other all over the world, we are still using faxes in healthcare. Digital must become the new normal - and as quickly as possible.” A spokesperson for NVZ said: “We’re proud that this scheme will allow us to build on the acceleration of exchanges with patients, as well as between medical specialist care institutions themselves.”

Hospital patients in the Netherlands will soon be able to view and share medical data about themselves online, following a bill to be presented later this year.

Under the initiative announced by Dutch minister for medical care Bruno Bruins, hospitals and health clinics will receive €75 million to help meet the new legal obligation to make medical data available.

The bill will also require hospitals and clinics to digitally exchange data with each other.

Under the plans, hospitals and other medical specialist care organisations sharing data will be required meet the safety requirements of MedMij, the Dutch technical framework for personal health environments.

The programme will be implemented by the Dutch Association for Hospitals (NVZ), the Dutch Federation of University Medical Centres (NFU) and the Netherlands Independent Clinics (ZKN).

WHY IT MATTERS 

Bruins said that making patient data available online will save time, prevent medical errors and mean that patients do not have to repeat their stories multiple times when seeing different medical professionals.

ICT specialists from the Ministry of Health, Welfare and Sport will monitor whether the data exchange between health institutions takes place digitally.

THE LARGER CONTEXT 

In a recent survey from HIMSS Analytics, the Netherlands was identified as one of the countries driving adoption of digital technology in European healthcare, alongside Estonia and the Nordics.

The country’s Acceleration Programme for Patient and Professional Information Exchange (VIPP) is helping to prepare healthcare organisations for the digital exchange of medical data and the government has made €400 million available in total towards digitalisation.  

One example of digitally enhanced patient care in the Netherlands is the ambulatory heart failure telemonitoring initiative, which the Ministry of Health, Welfare and Sport, says has led to a considerable reduction in acute care visits, ambulance calls and hospital stays.

ON THE RECORD 

Bruins said: “With this €75 million grant I want to make it possible for patients to take control of their own medical data. Digital data exchange also prevents avoidable errors and leaves doctors more time, because they don't have to retype data.

“I find it impossible at a time when we can see each other all over the world, we are still using faxes in healthcare. Digital must become the new normal - and as quickly as possible.”

A spokesperson for NVZ said: “We’re proud that this scheme will allow us to build on the acceleration of exchanges with patients, as well as between medical specialist care institutions themselves.”

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Breastfeeding may reduce type 2 diabetes risk among women with gestational diabetes, NIH study suggests http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/breastfeeding-may-reduce-type-2-diabetes-risk-among-women-gestational-diabetes-nih-study-suggests http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/breastfeeding-may-reduce-type-2-diabetes-risk-among-women-gestational-diabetes-nih-study-suggests Fri, 14 Feb 2020 17:30:00 CST NIH News Release The researchers analyzed data from a long-term study of risk factors for chronic diseases in women. ]]> Managing healthcare in India will see dramatic shift http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/video/managing-healthcare-india-will-see-dramatic-shift http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/video/managing-healthcare-india-will-see-dramatic-shift Fri, 14 Feb 2020 05:00:00 CST jfinison at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy Primary topic: Population HealthDisable Auto Tagging: Short Headline: Managing healthcare in India will see dramatic shiftFeatured Decision Content: Region Tag: Global EditionRight Now: 
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Remdesivir prevents MERS coronavirus disease in monkeys http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/remdesivir-prevents-mers-coronavirus-disease-monkeys http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/remdesivir-prevents-mers-coronavirus-disease-monkeys Thu, 13 Feb 2020 20:00:00 CST NIH News Release Results support testing antiviral against 2019 novel coronavirus. ]]> Study shows how a tiny and strange marine animal produces unlimited eggs and sperm over its lifetime http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/study-shows-how-tiny-strange-marine-animal-produces-unlimited-eggs-sperm-over-its-lifetime http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/study-shows-how-tiny-strange-marine-animal-produces-unlimited-eggs-sperm-over-its-lifetime Thu, 13 Feb 2020 19:15:00 CST NIH News Release NIH-supported research of Hydractinia could provide clues to human reproductive conditions. ]]> Genetic profile may predict chance of type 2 diabetes among women with gestational diabetes http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/genetic-profile-may-predict-chance-type-2-diabetes-among-women-gestational-diabetes http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/genetic-profile-may-predict-chance-type-2-diabetes-among-women-gestational-diabetes Thu, 13 Feb 2020 17:00:00 CST NIH News Release Researchers followed women before, during and after pregnancy and captured data on their health later in life. ]]> VA to delay rollout of Cerner EHR system, citing interoperability issues http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/va-delay-rollout-cerner-ehr-system-citing-interoperability-issues http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/va-delay-rollout-cerner-ehr-system-citing-interoperability-issues Wed, 12 Feb 2020 10:59:25 CST mmiliard at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs announced it has delayed the rollout of its planned electronic health record modernization at the Mann-Grandstaff VA Medical Center in Spokane, Washington, which was due to go live at the end of March. According to a report in the government IT news site FCW, the EHR system, based on Cerner’s Millennium software, requires more work before it is ready to go live. The remaining tasks include additional development of interfaces between the existing EHR, Cerner’s platform, and the general IT infrastructure of the VA, which could run through the end of April, FCW reported. "After rigorous testing of our new EHR, the department will need more time to complete the system build and ensure clinicians and other users are properly trained on it," said VA spokesperson Christina Mandreucci, according to a statement emailed to FCW. "We believe we are 75-80% complete in this regard and will be announcing a revised 'go-live' schedule in the coming weeks." The project is part of a $16 billion EHR modernization push by the VA which saw the establishment of the Office of Electronic Health Record Modernization, tasked to oversee the implementation of the same EHR system being deployed by the Department of Defense. The project has three main goals, among them the implementation of a EHR solution that is interoperable with DOD and community care providers, enabling the seamless sharing of records from active duty and beyond. The new EHR platform should also be able to provide Veterans and clinicians with a complete picture of patients’ medical history, enabling connections between military service and health outcomes through data analytics. Finally, the EHR system is designed to offer an “improved and consistent patient scheduling experience” across all VA medical facilities and community care partners. "VA should take the time it needs to get this $16 billion dollar implementation right, but it needs to be transparent with Congress," Rep. Mark Takano, D-California, chairman of the House VA Committee, said in a statement to FCW. "We are all charged to work on behalf of our nation’s veterans—a short-term delay is far better than rushing through a critical EHR transition that will strongly impact veterans’ lives." In June, DoD and VA officials announced the creation of a special office, the Federal Electronic Health Record Modernization office, to help centralize decision-making as the VA makes the multi-billion dollar EHR upgrade. The lack of interoperability between DoD and VA remains a major stumbling block for the EHR system, which is slated to go live across care sites by 2028. In addition, VHA medical facilities have a cumulative medical document backlog equivalent to more than five miles of stacked paper, with nearly 600,000 electronic files dating back to 2016, according to an OIG audit from August 2019. Nathan Eddy is a healthcare and technology freelancer based in Berlin. Email the writer: nathaneddy@gmail.com Twitter: @dropdeaded209

The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs announced it has delayed the rollout of its planned electronic health record modernization at the Mann-Grandstaff VA Medical Center in Spokane, Washington, which was due to go live at the end of March.

According to a report in the government IT news site FCW, the EHR system, based on Cerner’s Millennium software, requires more work before it is ready to go live.

The remaining tasks include additional development of interfaces between the existing EHR, Cerner’s platform, and the general IT infrastructure of the VA, which could run through the end of April, FCW reported.

"After rigorous testing of our new EHR, the department will need more time to complete the system build and ensure clinicians and other users are properly trained on it," said VA spokesperson Christina Mandreucci, according to a statement emailed to FCW. "We believe we are 75-80% complete in this regard and will be announcing a revised 'go-live' schedule in the coming weeks."

The project is part of a $16 billion EHR modernization push by the VA which saw the establishment of the Office of Electronic Health Record Modernization, tasked to oversee the implementation of the same EHR system being deployed by the Department of Defense.

The project has three main goals, among them the implementation of a EHR solution that is interoperable with DOD and community care providers, enabling the seamless sharing of records from active duty and beyond.

The new EHR platform should also be able to provide Veterans and clinicians with a complete picture of patients’ medical history, enabling connections between military service and health outcomes through data analytics.

Finally, the EHR system is designed to offer an “improved and consistent patient scheduling experience” across all VA medical facilities and community care partners.

"VA should take the time it needs to get this $16 billion dollar implementation right, but it needs to be transparent with Congress," Rep. Mark Takano, D-California, chairman of the House VA Committee, said in a statement to FCW. "We are all charged to work on behalf of our nation’s veterans—a short-term delay is far better than rushing through a critical EHR transition that will strongly impact veterans’ lives."

In June, DoD and VA officials announced the creation of a special office, the Federal Electronic Health Record Modernization office, to help centralize decision-making as the VA makes the multi-billion dollar EHR upgrade.

The lack of interoperability between DoD and VA remains a major stumbling block for the EHR system, which is slated to go live across care sites by 2028.

In addition, VHA medical facilities have a cumulative medical document backlog equivalent to more than five miles of stacked paper, with nearly 600,000 electronic files dating back to 2016, according to an OIG audit from August 2019.

Nathan Eddy is a healthcare and technology freelancer based in Berlin.
Email the writer: nathaneddy@gmail.com
Twitter: @dropdeaded209

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FDA, MITRE offer tips for med device cybersecurity http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/fda-mitre-offer-tips-med-device-cybersecurity http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/fda-mitre-offer-tips-med-device-cybersecurity Wed, 12 Feb 2020 09:12:01 CST mmiliard at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy Because threats and vulnerabilities cannot be eliminated, reducing cybersecurity risks is especially challenging – and medical device manufacturers and health care delivery organizations need to take steps to ensure appropriate safeguards are in place. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration, in partnership with the MITRE Corporation, has already championed two initiatives to improve medical device cybersecurity preparedness and response. The first is the development and use of a medical device cybersecurity sandbox to enable security research and technical evaluation of medical device vulnerabilities and potential mitigations across health systems, device manufacturers, and the FDA. "The FDA recognizes the importance of having a medical system-of-systems environment, such as sandboxes, that can simulate cyber attacks, assess medical device vulnerabilities, and test out remediation and mitigation strategies, without exposing patients to risk," said Dr. Suzanne Schwartz, director of the office of strategic partnerships and technology innovation at FDA. Schwartz, who will speak March 11 at HIMSS20 alongside an expert from MITRE, explained that medical device manufacturers and the healthcare community at large could benefit from the availability of clinical simulation centers and sandboxes as a safe space to identify, analyze and manage security vulnerabilities – all toward the goal of minimizing the potential impacts to device performance and enhancing patient safety. The second initiative involves the exploration of the viability and execution of a CyberMed Safety Analysis Board to integrate critical patient safety and clinical environment dimensions into the assessment and validation of high-risk/high-impact device vulnerabilities and incidents. Schwartz said the FDA strongly encourages communication sharing regarding cybersecurity risks and vulnerabilities between stakeholders, and routinely disseminates information publicly, pointing to a list of cybersecurity safety communications can be found here. "Additionally, the FDA has various cybersecurity information sharing agreements with various stakeholders to help us further protect and promote the public health," Schwartz said, noting additional helpful information is available on the FDA’s website. She explained that as the number of medical devices that are susceptible to cybersecurity threats grows, it will be increasingly important that stakeholders, including medical device manufacturers, the user, the information technology system integrator, health IT developers, and an array of IT vendors that provide products that are not regulated by the FDA, have shared responsibility for cybersecurity risk management. "The healthcare environment is complex, and manufacturers, hospitals, and facilities must work together to manage cybersecurity risks," Schwartz said. "For example, medical device manufacturers are responsible for remaining vigilant about identifying risks and hazards associated with their medical devices. This includes risks related to cybersecurity and health care delivery organizations should evaluate their network security and protect their hospital systems. "Both are responsible for putting appropriate mitigations in place to address patient safety risks and ensure proper device performance," she said. Suzanne Schwartz of FDA and Margie Zuk of MITRE, will share other device security recommendations HIMSS20 in a session titled, "Getting to Ground Truth on Medical Device Vulnerabilities." It's scheduled for Wednesday, March 11, from 1-2 p.m. in room W204A.

Because threats and vulnerabilities cannot be eliminated, reducing cybersecurity risks is especially challenging – and medical device manufacturers and health care delivery organizations need to take steps to ensure appropriate safeguards are in place.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration, in partnership with the MITRE Corporation, has already championed two initiatives to improve medical device cybersecurity preparedness and response.

The first is the development and use of a medical device cybersecurity sandbox to enable security research and technical evaluation of medical device vulnerabilities and potential mitigations across health systems, device manufacturers, and the FDA.

"The FDA recognizes the importance of having a medical system-of-systems environment, such as sandboxes, that can simulate cyber attacks, assess medical device vulnerabilities, and test out remediation and mitigation strategies, without exposing patients to risk," said Dr. Suzanne Schwartz, director of the office of strategic partnerships and technology innovation at FDA.

Schwartz, who will speak March 11 at HIMSS20 alongside an expert from MITRE, explained that medical device manufacturers and the healthcare community at large could benefit from the availability of clinical simulation centers and sandboxes as a safe space to identify, analyze and manage security vulnerabilities – all toward the goal of minimizing the potential impacts to device performance and enhancing patient safety.

The second initiative involves the exploration of the viability and execution of a CyberMed Safety Analysis Board to integrate critical patient safety and clinical environment dimensions into the assessment and validation of high-risk/high-impact device vulnerabilities and incidents.

Schwartz said the FDA strongly encourages communication sharing regarding cybersecurity risks and vulnerabilities between stakeholders, and routinely disseminates information publicly, pointing to a list of cybersecurity safety communications can be found here.

"Additionally, the FDA has various cybersecurity information sharing agreements with various stakeholders to help us further protect and promote the public health," Schwartz said, noting additional helpful information is available on the FDA’s website.

She explained that as the number of medical devices that are susceptible to cybersecurity threats grows, it will be increasingly important that stakeholders, including medical device manufacturers, the user, the information technology system integrator, health IT developers, and an array of IT vendors that provide products that are not regulated by the FDA, have shared responsibility for cybersecurity risk management.

"The healthcare environment is complex, and manufacturers, hospitals, and facilities must work together to manage cybersecurity risks," Schwartz said. "For example, medical device manufacturers are responsible for remaining vigilant about identifying risks and hazards associated with their medical devices.

This includes risks related to cybersecurity and health care delivery organizations should evaluate their network security and protect their hospital systems.

"Both are responsible for putting appropriate mitigations in place to address patient safety risks and ensure proper device performance," she said.

Suzanne Schwartz of FDA and Margie Zuk of MITRE, will share other device security recommendations HIMSS20 in a session titled, "Getting to Ground Truth on Medical Device Vulnerabilities." It's scheduled for Wednesday, March 11, from 1-2 p.m. in room W204A.

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Recent advances in addressing tuberculosis give hope for future http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/recent-advances-addressing-tuberculosis-give-hope-future http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/recent-advances-addressing-tuberculosis-give-hope-future Tue, 11 Feb 2020 15:30:00 CST NIH News Release NIH officials describe “banner year”. ]]> Less than a quarter of at-risk adolescent boys ever get tested for HIV http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/less-quarter-risk-adolescent-boys-ever-get-tested-hiv http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/less-quarter-risk-adolescent-boys-ever-get-tested-hiv Tue, 11 Feb 2020 15:15:00 CST NIH News Release Study stresses promoting patient-clinician communication about sexual behavior to encourage HIV testing in teenagers. ]]> Estonia empowers citizens with their health data http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/video/europe/estonia-empowers-citizens-their-health-data http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/video/europe/estonia-empowers-citizens-their-health-data Tue, 11 Feb 2020 13:00:00 CST jfinison at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy Primary topic: Electronic Health Records (EHR, EMR)Disable Auto Tagging: Short Headline: Estonia empowers citizens with their health dataFeatured Decision Content: Region Tag: Europe/UKRight Now: 
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Neural signature identifies people likely to respond to antidepressant medication http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/neural-signature-identifies-people-likely-respond-antidepressant-medication http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/neural-signature-identifies-people-likely-respond-antidepressant-medication Mon, 10 Feb 2020 16:00:00 CST NIH News Release NIH-funded research used machine learning algorithm to predict individual treatment response. ]]> Kuwait's journey toward implementing a national EHR http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/video/kuwaits-journey-toward-implementing-national-ehr http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/video/kuwaits-journey-toward-implementing-national-ehr Mon, 10 Feb 2020 13:00:00 CST jfinison at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy Primary topic: Electronic Health Records (EHR, EMR)Disable Auto Tagging: Short Headline: Kuwait's journey toward implementing a national EHRFeatured Decision Content: Region Tag: Global EditionRight Now: 
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Full coverage of HIMSS20 http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/full-coverage-himss20 http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/full-coverage-himss20 Mon, 10 Feb 2020 09:08:49 CST at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com The 2020 HIMSS Global Health Conference & Exhibition, which takes place March 9-13 at the Orange County Convention Center in Orlando, is fast approaching. Be sure to check here regularly at Healthcare IT News for our previews, onsite coverage and recaps of the big show. 2020 will see shift in Thailand's medical tourism business http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/video/asia-pacific/2020-will-see-shift-thailands-medical-tourism-business http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/video/asia-pacific/2020-will-see-shift-thailands-medical-tourism-business Fri, 07 Feb 2020 13:00:00 CST rickdagley at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy Primary topic: Government & PolicyDisable Auto Tagging: Short Headline: 2020 will see shift in Thailand's medical tourism businessFeatured Decision Content: Region Tag: Asia PacificRight Now: 
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VA set to open fully 5G-enabled hospital In California http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/va-set-open-fully-5g-enabled-hospital-california http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/va-set-open-fully-5g-enabled-hospital-california Fri, 07 Feb 2020 11:44:07 CST mmiliard at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy The Veterans Affairs hospital in Palo Alto, California, is soon to become one of the first 5G enabled health facilities in the world, with portions becoming operational this week, according to statements VA Secretary Robert Wilkie said at State of the VA speech Feb. 5 at the National Press Club in Washington, DC. The 5G networking capabilities will provide means of delivering telesurgery services to Veterans, he noted, giving the VA the capacity to allow their physicians to consult during surgery, "even if they’re not in the same room and are halfway across the country." Along with decreased wait times for appointments and better overall care, the secretary pointed to several other programs designed to provide better Veteran care, including a pilot program to develop exoskeletons that stimulate the spinal cord. "Instead of the exoskeleton moving the patient around, the patient can increasingly control the exoskeleton as their own muscles are reactivated," said Wilkie. "With further research at VA, we are hoping to turn the exoskeleton from a mobility device into something that trains injured people to walk again under their own power." During the speech, the secretary pointed to other innovations intended to improve care for veterans, including expanded telehealth services, virtual reality care services for veterans dealing with PTSD, and a precision oncology program, which aims to help provide targeted cancer care for veterans based on their genetic profiles. The VA is seeing substantial growth in telehealth and other key patient engagement tools as it continues to make major investments in innovating its technology and infrastructure. As Wilkie noted, 5G will boost the efficacy of those efforts. The VA among the first to embrace the potentially transformative value of 5G. Back in January 2019, Rush University Medical Center announced plans to become the first hospital 5G in the US with 5G network services provided by operator AT&T. The 5G technology will be employed in various use cases aimed at improving outcomes, increasing staff and taking advantage of operator’s 5G network, edge computing, a cloud-based IT service environment at the edge of the network. At HIMSS 20 next month AT&T will discuss the 5G standard, describing its most promising healthcare use cases and the steps health systems should be taking to prepare their infrastructure to capitalize on it. Nathan Eddy is a healthcare and technology freelancer based in Berlin. Email the writer: nathaneddy@gmail.com Twitter: @dropdeaded209

The Veterans Affairs hospital in Palo Alto, California, is soon to become one of the first 5G enabled health facilities in the world, with portions becoming operational this week, according to statements VA Secretary Robert Wilkie said at State of the VA speech Feb. 5 at the National Press Club in Washington, DC.

The 5G networking capabilities will provide means of delivering telesurgery services to Veterans, he noted, giving the VA the capacity to allow their physicians to consult during surgery, "even if they’re not in the same room and are halfway across the country."

Along with decreased wait times for appointments and better overall care, the secretary pointed to several other programs designed to provide better Veteran care, including a pilot program to develop exoskeletons that stimulate the spinal cord.

"Instead of the exoskeleton moving the patient around, the patient can increasingly control the exoskeleton as their own muscles are reactivated," said Wilkie. "With further research at VA, we are hoping to turn the exoskeleton from a mobility device into something that trains injured people to walk again under their own power."

During the speech, the secretary pointed to other innovations intended to improve care for veterans, including expanded telehealth services, virtual reality care services for veterans dealing with PTSD, and a precision oncology program, which aims to help provide targeted cancer care for veterans based on their genetic profiles.

The VA is seeing substantial growth in telehealth and other key patient engagement tools as it continues to make major investments in innovating its technology and infrastructure. As Wilkie noted, 5G will boost the efficacy of those efforts.

The VA among the first to embrace the potentially transformative value of 5G. Back in January 2019, Rush University Medical Center announced plans to become the first hospital 5G in the US with 5G network services provided by operator AT&T.

The 5G technology will be employed in various use cases aimed at improving outcomes, increasing staff and taking advantage of operator’s 5G network, edge computing, a cloud-based IT service environment at the edge of the network.

At HIMSS 20 next month AT&T will discuss the 5G standard, describing its most promising healthcare use cases and the steps health systems should be taking to prepare their infrastructure to capitalize on it.

Nathan Eddy is a healthcare and technology freelancer based in Berlin.
Email the writer: nathaneddy@gmail.com
Twitter: @dropdeaded209

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Data and technology to play key role in Europe’s Beating Cancer Plan, says EU chief http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/europe/data-and-technology-play-key-role-europe-s-beating-cancer-plan-says-eu-chief http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/europe/data-and-technology-play-key-role-europe-s-beating-cancer-plan-says-eu-chief Thu, 06 Feb 2020 02:41:57 CST dyogendra at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy Estimates from the International Agency for Research on Cancer indicate that, globally, there were 17 million new cases of cancer in 2018. Within the next two decades, that number is projected to grow to 27.5 million. In the EU, although 3.5 million people are diagnosed every year, the last scheme for the prevention and detection of cancer ‘dates back 30 years’, according to European Commission president Ursula von der Leyen. Vowing to take action, on World Cancer Day (4 February), von der Leyen announced the launch of a public consultation to help shape Europe’s Beating Cancer Plan, a new strategy expected to be released before the end of the year. “For me, and for so many of you, this is personal. We all have our personal stories of struggle, pain and resilience,” the EU chief said this week at a conference in Brussels. “I first heard the word cancer when I was a teenager. I was 13 years old when my little sister died of a reticulo sarcoma. She was only 11 years old. And there was nothing my family nor the doctors could do to save her,” she recounted. “My little sister's death has changed my life. I guess it is also because of her death that I decided to study medicine and become a medical doctor. And it is because of her, and my mother, and one of my brothers, that I care so much about fighting cancer.” WHY IT MATTERS According to the World Health Organization, between 30-50% of all cancer cases can be prevented. Despite that, however, only around 3% of total health spending in the EU is attributed to prevention, according to a report from the European Commission published last year. In Malta, Greece and Slovakia, that number is below 2%. “The first issue we need to discuss is prevention – because prevention is the best cure that we currently have,” von der Leyen said. “There are many answers to find: Could we consider setting targets for investment on prevention? What about the development of regional cancer care networks by quality-assured health facilities? We know that lifestyle has a huge influence, so how can we change our own lifestyle and make it healthier?” she asked. Employing the use of the latest technologies will play a crucial role in this work, the EU executive continued. “Technology can be a lifesaver for thousands of people. We know, for instance, that the use of artificial intelligence can significantly improve the precision of early diagnosis. It can be a powerful tool to reduce false positives and negatives.” But that also means that the EU needs to get better at sharing data. “Within the data we have lies an incredible amount of missed opportunities, unknown improvements, potential correction of false hypothesis – but we must use and share these data. We are now setting up a Common Health Data Space, an infrastructure where scientists and medical clinicians will be able not only to store clinical and research data, but also to access other scientists' data. “We need a health data infrastructure, as well as artificial intelligence technologies, to facilitate the link between research, diagnosis and care.” THE LARGER PICTURE Although details are scarce at this stage, we know that von der Leyen tasked Stella Kyriakides, commissioner for health and food safety, with the creation of a European Health Data Space last year. The initiative is expected to “promote health-data exchange and support research on new preventive strategies, as well as on treatments, medicines, medical devices and outcomes”, according to the commission. Their ambition has been recognised across the EU, and all eyes are now on upcoming announcements. But some are also pointing to the number of countries in Europe where health services are still running on paper or using outdated systems that do not talk to each other and put more strain on the workforce. ON THE RECORD “Cancer is an area where EU citizens expect us to take decisive actions,” Kyriakides said in a statement. “The success of the [Europe’s Beating Cancer] Plan will depend on the full engagement of citizens, cancer patients, stakeholders and actors at European, national and local levels. I invite everyone to participate and make this plan as ambitious and efficient as possible.” More information about the new consultation, which will run for 12 weeks, can be found here.

Estimates from the International Agency for Research on Cancer indicate that, globally, there were 17 million new cases of cancer in 2018. Within the next two decades, that number is projected to grow to 27.5 million.

In the EU, although 3.5 million people are diagnosed every year, the last scheme for the prevention and detection of cancer ‘dates back 30 years’, according to European Commission president Ursula von der Leyen.

Vowing to take action, on World Cancer Day (4 February), von der Leyen announced the launch of a public consultation to help shape Europe’s Beating Cancer Plan, a new strategy expected to be released before the end of the year.

“For me, and for so many of you, this is personal. We all have our personal stories of struggle, pain and resilience,” the EU chief said this week at a conference in Brussels.

“I first heard the word cancer when I was a teenager. I was 13 years old when my little sister died of a reticulo sarcoma. She was only 11 years old. And there was nothing my family nor the doctors could do to save her,” she recounted. “My little sister's death has changed my life. I guess it is also because of her death that I decided to study medicine and become a medical doctor. And it is because of her, and my mother, and one of my brothers, that I care so much about fighting cancer.”

WHY IT MATTERS

According to the World Health Organization, between 30-50% of all cancer cases can be prevented. Despite that, however, only around 3% of total health spending in the EU is attributed to prevention, according to a report from the European Commission published last year. In Malta, Greece and Slovakia, that number is below 2%.

“The first issue we need to discuss is prevention – because prevention is the best cure that we currently have,” von der Leyen said. “There are many answers to find: Could we consider setting targets for investment on prevention? What about the development of regional cancer care networks by quality-assured health facilities? We know that lifestyle has a huge influence, so how can we change our own lifestyle and make it healthier?” she asked.

Employing the use of the latest technologies will play a crucial role in this work, the EU executive continued.

“Technology can be a lifesaver for thousands of people. We know, for instance, that the use of artificial intelligence can significantly improve the precision of early diagnosis. It can be a powerful tool to reduce false positives and negatives.”

But that also means that the EU needs to get better at sharing data.

“Within the data we have lies an incredible amount of missed opportunities, unknown improvements, potential correction of false hypothesis – but we must use and share these data. We are now setting up a Common Health Data Space, an infrastructure where scientists and medical clinicians will be able not only to store clinical and research data, but also to access other scientists' data.

“We need a health data infrastructure, as well as artificial intelligence technologies, to facilitate the link between research, diagnosis and care.”

THE LARGER PICTURE

Although details are scarce at this stage, we know that von der Leyen tasked Stella Kyriakides, commissioner for health and food safety, with the creation of a European Health Data Space last year.

The initiative is expected to “promote health-data exchange and support research on new preventive strategies, as well as on treatments, medicines, medical devices and outcomes”, according to the commission.

Their ambition has been recognised across the EU, and all eyes are now on upcoming announcements. But some are also pointing to the number of countries in Europe where health services are still running on paper or using outdated systems that do not talk to each other and put more strain on the workforce.

ON THE RECORD

“Cancer is an area where EU citizens expect us to take decisive actions,” Kyriakides said in a statement. “The success of the [Europe’s Beating Cancer] Plan will depend on the full engagement of citizens, cancer patients, stakeholders and actors at European, national and local levels. I invite everyone to participate and make this plan as ambitious and efficient as possible.”

More information about the new consultation, which will run for 12 weeks, can be found here.

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Telehealth billing guide highlights complexities of use http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/telehealth-billing-guide-highlights-complexities-use http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/telehealth-billing-guide-highlights-complexities-use Wed, 05 Feb 2020 10:04:33 CST mmiliard at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy The Center for Connected Health Policy has published a 21-page guide intended to help providers with telehealth-based Medicare and Medicaid reimbursements. WHY IT MATTERS The guide offers clarification for billing for remote patient monitoring, synchronous (real-time) asynchronous (store-and-forward) telehealth services and billing for virtual healthcare services, as well as mobile health services. It focuses primarily on fee-for-service Medicare and an example of one Medicaid program, California's Medi-Cal, as a starting point—the report also notes the complexity and sometimes nebulous terminology like "distant sites" and "originating sites". For example, Medi-Cal designates a "distant site" as a site where a health care provider who provides health care services is located while providing these services via a telecommunications system. The distant site for purposes of telehealth can be different from the administrative location. This allows the practitioner to be in a location suitable to telehealth encounters, but not necessarily in a clinic or facility themselves, according to the California Department of Health Care Services. For Medicare "originating sites," beneficiaries need to be at a site outside a metropolitan statistical area or within a defined eligible location, with a few exceptions, while a Medi-Cal beneficiary can be geographically anywhere. The report offers eight different cases in which the billing for telehealth services can vary based on the type of healthcare plan and care received, for example a 35-year-old man on Medi-Cal who has consented to e-consultation. In addition, the CCHP provides guidance on additional ways providers can benefit from the use of telehealth components in bundled management of care scenarios, namely through chronic care management and transitional care management. The report concluded that until telehealth is considered a mode of care as opposed to a separate type of service, what can and cannot be billed and reimbursed would vary depending on state rules and regulations. Patient demographics are also likely to affect billing workflows and choices, and the report notes there are other policies to consider that could impact telehealth billing, as well as opportunities that may not be readily apparent because services are not called "telehealth" but utilize the technology. THE LARGER TREND Telehealth technology could offer multiple benefits to patients and providers alike--a recent American Hospital Association report on workforce strategic planning trends says the technology is well-positioned to help health systems combat professional staffing shortages. Asynchronous virtual visits are helping reduce the burdens on primary care providers at Prisma Health, while also enabling easier access, convenience and speed to care for patients. In another case study this week, we showed the tangible work-life benefits and financial ROI enjoyed by one solo practice's shift toward telehealth consults. ON THE RECORD The guide notes that while telehealth is a promising technology, its value is tempered by complications that arise due to reimbursement policies that vary from payer to payer--for example, policies that apply to a Medicare beneficiary are different than those that apply to a Medicaid enrollee. "Before embarking on these services, consider the front-end education for your staff," said CCHP expert, "so that patients are provided with educational materials, as CMS suggests, so that the cost of the back-end, billing folks interacting with patients, do not negate the benefits of utilizing these services." Nathan Eddy is a healthcare and technology freelancer based in Berlin. Email the writer: nathaneddy@gmail.com Twitter: @dropdeaded209  

The Center for Connected Health Policy has published a 21-page guide intended to help providers with telehealth-based Medicare and Medicaid reimbursements.

WHY IT MATTERS
The guide offers clarification for billing for remote patient monitoring, synchronous (real-time) asynchronous (store-and-forward) telehealth services and billing for virtual healthcare services, as well as mobile health services.

It focuses primarily on fee-for-service Medicare and an example of one Medicaid program, California's Medi-Cal, as a starting point—the report also notes the complexity and sometimes nebulous terminology like "distant sites" and "originating sites".

For example, Medi-Cal designates a "distant site" as a site where a health care provider who provides health care services is located while providing these services via a telecommunications system. The distant site for purposes of telehealth can be different from the administrative location.

This allows the practitioner to be in a location suitable to telehealth encounters, but not necessarily in a clinic or facility themselves, according to the California Department of Health Care Services.

For Medicare "originating sites," beneficiaries need to be at a site outside a metropolitan statistical area or within a defined eligible location, with a few exceptions, while a Medi-Cal beneficiary can be geographically anywhere.

The report offers eight different cases in which the billing for telehealth services can vary based on the type of healthcare plan and care received, for example a 35-year-old man on Medi-Cal who has consented to e-consultation.

In addition, the CCHP provides guidance on additional ways providers can benefit from the use of telehealth components in bundled management of care scenarios, namely through chronic care management and transitional care management.

The report concluded that until telehealth is considered a mode of care as opposed to a separate type of service, what can and cannot be billed and reimbursed would vary depending on state rules and regulations.

Patient demographics are also likely to affect billing workflows and choices, and the report notes there are other policies to consider that could impact telehealth billing, as well as opportunities that may not be readily apparent because services are not called "telehealth" but utilize the technology.

THE LARGER TREND
Telehealth technology could offer multiple benefits to patients and providers alike--a recent American Hospital Association report on workforce strategic planning trends says the technology is well-positioned to help health systems combat professional staffing shortages.

Asynchronous virtual visits are helping reduce the burdens on primary care providers at Prisma Health, while also enabling easier access, convenience and speed to care for patients. In another case study this week, we showed the tangible work-life benefits and financial ROI enjoyed by one solo practice's shift toward telehealth consults.

ON THE RECORD
The guide notes that while telehealth is a promising technology, its value is tempered by complications that arise due to reimbursement policies that vary from payer to payer--for example, policies that apply to a Medicare beneficiary are different than those that apply to a Medicaid enrollee.

"Before embarking on these services, consider the front-end education for your staff," said CCHP expert, "so that patients are provided with educational materials, as CMS suggests, so that the cost of the back-end, billing folks interacting with patients, do not negate the benefits of utilizing these services."

Nathan Eddy is a healthcare and technology freelancer based in Berlin.
Email the writer: nathaneddy@gmail.com
Twitter: @dropdeaded209

 

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Physicians should think twice about promoting medical credit cards to their patients http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/finance-experts-warn-medical-credit-cards?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/finance-experts-warn-medical-credit-cards?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Tue, 20 Feb 2018 10:15:20 CST Joanne Finnegan at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Consumers use credit cards to pay for everything (including the kitchen sink), and the latest trend has people using medical credit cards to pay for healthcare services. But financial experts are warning practices about the pitfalls of promoting so-called medical credit cards to their patients, says the Healthcare Financial Management Association. Trump administration issues proposed rule to expand short-term insurance plans http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/trump-administration-short-term-insurance-rule?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/trump-administration-short-term-insurance-rule?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Tue, 20 Feb 2018 09:56:31 CST Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare A proposed rule issued by three federal agencies on Tuesday would expand limits for short-term health insurance plans from three months to 12 months. CMS's Seema Verma dismissed concerns that the policy shift would destabilize the individual market by siphoning off healthy individuals, arguing the change will have "virtually no impact" on ACA premiums. Under Trump, HHS rolls back policies aimed at protecting LGBT rights http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/trump-hhs-lgbt-rights-alex-azar?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/trump-hhs-lgbt-rights-alex-azar?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Tue, 20 Feb 2018 09:31:52 CST Leslie Small at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Though President Donald Trump promised to support LGBT causes during the 2016 campaign, under his watch the Department of Health and Human Services had rolled back several initiatives aimed at protecting the rights of that population. New HHS Secretary Alex Azar could take the department in a different direction. Study: Community navigators can reduce the high cost of 'superusers' in hospital settings http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/patient-engagement/community-navigators-superusers-hospital-visits-decrease?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/patient-engagement/community-navigators-superusers-hospital-visits-decrease?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Tue, 20 Feb 2018 09:08:46 CST Paige Minemyer at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare "Superusers," those costly patients who utilize high levels of hospital care, are a significant burden on the healthcare system. But a new study suggests that pairing them with community navigators can reduce their use of hospital services. Researchers in Tennessee found that the intervention reduced their healthcare encounters by 39%. Patients lack information about imaging exams, study finds http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/patients-lack-information-imaging-exams-radiology-study-yale?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/patients-lack-information-imaging-exams-radiology-study-yale?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Sat, 17 Feb 2018 20:14:46 CST Joanne Finnegan at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Doctors can do a better job providing patients with information before they go for an imaging exam, a new study found. One in five patients shows up for an imaging exam without any information about the test they are about to undergo, according to the study published in Radiology. Most for-profit hospitals will benefit from U.S. tax overhaul, but 2 big-name providers stand to gain the most http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/most-for-profit-hospitals-will-benefit-from-us-tax-overhaul-but-two-big-name-providers?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/most-for-profit-hospitals-will-benefit-from-us-tax-overhaul-but-two-big-name-providers?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 16 Feb 2018 15:23:18 CST Ilene MacDonald at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Most for-profit hospitals stand to gain from the changes to the U.S. tax laws, according to a new Moody’s Investors Service report. But HCA Healthcare and Universal Health Service will be the biggest beneficiaries and could see their operating cash flows go up by 10% or more. North Carolina attorney general seeks more details on Atrium Health-UNC Health Care merger  http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/atrium-health-university-north-carolina-merger-ag-wants-details?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/atrium-health-university-north-carolina-merger-ag-wants-details?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 16 Feb 2018 15:12:13 CST Paige Minemyer at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare North Carolina's attorney general is asking Atrium Health and UNC Health Care to provide more information on their merger plans. AG Josh Stein said he intends to ensure that the planned merger doesn't increase patient costs. 5 medical conditions that cost more than $15K per hospital stay http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/5-medical-conditions-cost-more-than-15k-per-hospital-stay?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/5-medical-conditions-cost-more-than-15k-per-hospital-stay?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 16 Feb 2018 14:01:34 CST Ilene MacDonald at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Heart valve disorders lead the list of the most expensive medical conditions with the highest average cost per inpatient stay, according to an analysis by Business Insider based on 2016 data from Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project. Heart valve disorders, on average, cost $41,878 per stay, the analysis found. Anthem alters controversial ER coverage policies http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/anthem-er-coverage-policy-changes?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/anthem-er-coverage-policy-changes?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 16 Feb 2018 11:50:13 CST Leslie Small at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Seeking to address mounting concerns from providers and other stakeholders, Anthem has made changes to policies it previously rolled out that restrict coverage for emergency room visits. The insurer has implemented a series of “always pay” exceptions for certain circumstances, like when the patient received any kind of surgery or an MRI or CT scan. VA head Shulkin to reimburse disputed European travel expenses, but Dems call for hearing over controversy http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/healthcare/va-head-s-european-trip-drama-continues-shulkin-will-reimburse-disputed-expenses-but-won?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/healthcare/va-head-s-european-trip-drama-continues-shulkin-will-reimburse-disputed-expenses-but-won?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 16 Feb 2018 10:30:06 CST Ilene MacDonald at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Veterans Affairs Secretary David Shulkin, M.D., says he will reimburse travel expenses that were the subject of an internal investigation into a trip he took to Europe this summer, but that may not put an end to the controversy. One lawmaker has called for Shulkin’s resignation, and four Democrats have requested a hearing about the trip.