MedClimate Health News Daily http://medclimate.com/feed en-us Copyright MedClimate, Inc2018 Study links frequent red meat consumption to high levels of chemical associated with heart disease http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/study-links-frequent-red-meat-consumption-high-levels-chemical-associated-heart-disease http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/study-links-frequent-red-meat-consumption-high-levels-chemical-associated-heart-disease Mon, 10 Dec 2018 21:45:00 CST NIH News Release Findings reveal tripling of blood levels of TMAO from red meat diet, but dietary effects can be reversed ]]> Moderate or severe sleep apnea doubles risk of hard-to-treat hypertension in African-Americans http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/moderate-or-severe-sleep-apnea-doubles-risk-hard-treat-hypertension-african-americans http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/moderate-or-severe-sleep-apnea-doubles-risk-hard-treat-hypertension-african-americans Mon, 10 Dec 2018 10:00:00 CST NIH News Release Treatment of sleep disorder might help improve blood pressure control in this high-risk group. ]]> ONC names winners of Certified Health IT Product List challenge http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/onc-names-winners-certified-health-it-product-list-challenge http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/onc-names-winners-certified-health-it-product-list-challenge Fri, 07 Dec 2018 09:59:21 CST mmiliard at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy Three winners and one honorable mention have been announced in the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT'’s Certified Health IT Product List Data Challenge. The competitors were tasked to find ways for users of the Certified Health IT Product List to make better use of the granular data it keeps on every technology product that has been approved by ONC. The winners include: ResearchAE. First place winners ResearchAE took their background in developing health IT dataset search engines to map out many of the different realms of data CHPL contains, enabling users to analyze how ONC certified health IT is being used and by whom. The prize was $20,000 Shiro Labs. Shiro Labs claimed runner-up for an application enabling providers to cross-analyze their Medicare Quality Payment Program and CHPL data, helping them see how they are meeting their reporting requirements. The prize was $10,000. Darena Solutions. Darena Solutions also won runner-up for CheckEHR, a program that lets users view which certified criteria different certified health IT modules meet, allowing them to better reach goals like patient engagement or care coordination. The prize was $10,000. Tom Nguyen. Nguyen won an honorable mention for a Google Chrome extension that helps users more easily navigate the CHPL listings. WHY IT MATTERS The CHPL contains a massive amount of very granular data which has only recently been made available in a structured and actionable way. Providers already have to abide by a wide range of standards and regulations, so having easier access to the CHPL data and finding ways to make more efficient use of it will help enable organizations to better use their health IT. Webinar: The EHR App Store Is Open - What Is on the Shelf? THE LARGER TREND As the healthcare technology marketplace evolves, new to health IT start to take bigger roles in the space, providers will continue to roll out new IT services to meet those demands and remain competitive. Being able to make intelligent searches of CHPL data means providers can chart a more informed course though the array of technology options available. ON THE RECORD "This challenge shows that there is more to the CHPL data than meets the eye. It is great to the see the creativity and ingenuity each participant put into their submissions," said Steve Posnack, executive director, office of technology, ONC. Benjamin Harris is a Maine-based freelance writer and and former new media producer for HIMSS Media. Twitter: @BenzoHarris.

Three winners and one honorable mention have been announced in the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT'’s Certified Health IT Product List Data Challenge. The competitors were tasked to find ways for users of the Certified Health IT Product List to make better use of the granular data it keeps on every technology product that has been approved by ONC.

The winners include:

  • ResearchAE. First place winners ResearchAE took their background in developing health IT dataset search engines to map out many of the different realms of data CHPL contains, enabling users to analyze how ONC certified health IT is being used and by whom. The prize was $20,000
  • Shiro Labs. Shiro Labs claimed runner-up for an application enabling providers to cross-analyze their Medicare Quality Payment Program and CHPL data, helping them see how they are meeting their reporting requirements. The prize was $10,000.
  • Darena Solutions. Darena Solutions also won runner-up for CheckEHR, a program that lets users view which certified criteria different certified health IT modules meet, allowing them to better reach goals like patient engagement or care coordination. The prize was $10,000.
  • Tom Nguyen. Nguyen won an honorable mention for a Google Chrome extension that helps users more easily navigate the CHPL listings.

WHY IT MATTERS
The CHPL contains a massive amount of very granular data which has only recently been made available in a structured and actionable way. Providers already have to abide by a wide range of standards and regulations, so having easier access to the CHPL data and finding ways to make more efficient use of it will help enable organizations to better use their health IT.

THE LARGER TREND
As the healthcare technology marketplace evolves, new to health IT start to take bigger roles in the space, providers will continue to roll out new IT services to meet those demands and remain competitive. Being able to make intelligent searches of CHPL data means providers can chart a more informed course though the array of technology options available.

ON THE RECORD
"This challenge shows that there is more to the CHPL data than meets the eye. It is great to the see the creativity and ingenuity each participant put into their submissions," said Steve Posnack, executive director, office of technology, ONC.

Benjamin Harris is a Maine-based freelance writer and and former new media producer for HIMSS Media.
Twitter: @BenzoHarris.

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Why sharing genetic information is vital for the future http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/video/why-sharing-genetic-information-vital-future http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/video/why-sharing-genetic-information-vital-future Thu, 06 Dec 2018 15:17:41 CST jfinison at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy Primary topic: Government & PolicyPrimary Topic: Electronic Health RecordsAdditional Topics: TechnologyEHRPolicyTechnologySecurityPolicySpecific Terms: Electronic Health RecordsPrivacy & SecurityCustom Tags: Electronic Health RecordsPrivacy & SecurityDisable Auto Tagging: Short Headline: Why sharing genetic information is vital for the futureFeatured Decision Content: 
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Elevated hormone flags liver problems in mice with methylmalonic acidemia http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/elevated-hormone-flags-liver-problems-mice-methylmalonic-acidemia http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/elevated-hormone-flags-liver-problems-mice-methylmalonic-acidemia Thu, 06 Dec 2018 14:00:00 CST NIH News Release Study findings can immediately be applied to human patients with the disease. ]]> Low-income, rural kids at higher risk for second- or third-hand smoke exposure http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/low-income-rural-kids-higher-risk-second-or-third-hand-smoke-exposure http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/low-income-rural-kids-higher-risk-second-or-third-hand-smoke-exposure Thu, 06 Dec 2018 13:15:00 CST NIH News Release NIH-funded study suggests ways to reduce risk for infants and toddlers. ]]> HIPAA modernization push gets backing from AHIMA and AMIA http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/hipaa-modernization-push-gets-backing-ahima-and-amia http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/hipaa-modernization-push-gets-backing-ahima-and-amia Wed, 05 Dec 2018 14:14:07 CST mmiliard at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, better known (if not always spelled correctly) as HIPAA, was signed into law by President Bill Clinton in August 1996. A lot has changed in the two decades since – in the ways consumers interact with health systems and the ways technology is transforming care delivery and the patient experience. So maybe it's time to give the privacy law a refresh, said the American Medical Informatics Association and the American Health Information Management Association.   WHY IT MATTERS As access to personal health information is easier than ever, with smartphones now ubiquitous and apps and connected devices proliferating by the day, both AMIA and AHIMA have voiced support for HIPAA modernization. In a joint appearance on Capitol Hill, in a presentation about unlocking data for patient empowerment, experts from the two groups highlighted how healthcare has a lot of catching up to do to serve a population used to online shopping, travel booking, review sites and more. Webinar: The Future of Medicine: Protecting Privacy Without Impacting Quality of Care Toward this vision of improved patient experience, AMIA and AHIMA said U.S. policymakers should take steps to update HIPAA to enable greater data access and portability – something that looks more likely than it did even a few months ago. It could be done in a couple different ways, they said. First, potentially, by establishing a new concept of a health data set, with that HDS comprising all the clinical, biomedical and claims data maintained by a covered entity or business associate. Another option is to revise HIPAA's existing "designated record set" definition, requiring certified health IT products to provide that amended DRS to patients digitally – enabling in a way that enables them to use and reuse their data.   They explained that a new definition for HDS would support individual HIPAA right of access and guide the future development of ONC's Certification Program so individuals could view, download, or transmit to a third party this information electronically and access this information via application programming interface. Revising the existing DRS definition, meanwhile, offer more clarity and predictability for both providers and patients, AMIA and AHIMA said. THE LARGER TREND Even as the availability and maturity of consumer technology has improved, "more than two decades after Congress declared access a right guaranteed by law, patients continue to face barriers," said Dr. Thomas Payne, medical director, IT Services at UW Medicine. "We need a focused look at both the technical as well as social barriers."   AMIA and AHIMA called a broader conversation regarding consumer data privacy, and called on Congress to "extend the HIPAA individual right of access and amendment to non-HIPAA Covered Entities that manage individual health data, such as mHealth and health social media applications. The goal is uniformity of data access policy, regardless of covered entity, business associate, or other commercial status."   Moreover, the groups said regulators should clarify existing regulatory guidance related, for example, to third-party legal requests, such as those by lawyers looking for information without appropriate patient permissions. ON THE RECORD "Congress has long prioritized patients' right to access their data as a key lever to improve care, enable research, and empower patients to live healthy lifestyles," said Dr. Doug Fridsma, president and CEO and AMIA. "But enacting these policies into regulations and translating these regulations to practice has proven more difficult than Congress imagined." "AHIMA's members are most aware of patient challenges in accessing their data as they operationalize the process for access across the healthcare landscape," said AHIMA CEO Wylecia Wiggs Harris, in a statement. "The language in HIPAA complicates these efforts in an electronic world." Twitter: @MikeMiliardHITN Email the writer: mike.miliard@himssmedia.com Healthcare IT News is a publication of HIMSS Media. 

The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, better known (if not always spelled correctly) as HIPAA, was signed into law by President Bill Clinton in August 1996.

A lot has changed in the two decades since – in the ways consumers interact with health systems and the ways technology is transforming care delivery and the patient experience. So maybe it's time to give the privacy law a refresh, said the American Medical Informatics Association and the American Health Information Management Association.
 
WHY IT MATTERS
As access to personal health information is easier than ever, with smartphones now ubiquitous and apps and connected devices proliferating by the day, both AMIA and AHIMA have voiced support for HIPAA modernization.

In a joint appearance on Capitol Hill, in a presentation about unlocking data for patient empowerment, experts from the two groups highlighted how healthcare has a lot of catching up to do to serve a population used to online shopping, travel booking, review sites and more.

Toward this vision of improved patient experience, AMIA and AHIMA said U.S. policymakers should take steps to update HIPAA to enable greater data access and portability – something that looks more likely than it did even a few months ago.

It could be done in a couple different ways, they said. First, potentially, by establishing a new concept of a health data set, with that HDS comprising all the clinical, biomedical and claims data maintained by a covered entity or business associate.

Another option is to revise HIPAA's existing "designated record set" definition, requiring certified health IT products to provide that amended DRS to patients digitally – enabling in a way that enables them to use and reuse their data.
 
They explained that a new definition for HDS would support individual HIPAA right of access and guide the future development of ONC's Certification Program so individuals could view, download, or transmit to a third party this information electronically and access this information via application programming interface.

Revising the existing DRS definition, meanwhile, offer more clarity and predictability for both providers and patients, AMIA and AHIMA said.

THE LARGER TREND
Even as the availability and maturity of consumer technology has improved, "more than two decades after Congress declared access a right guaranteed by law, patients continue to face barriers," said Dr. Thomas Payne, medical director, IT Services at UW Medicine. "We need a focused look at both the technical as well as social barriers."
 
AMIA and AHIMA called a broader conversation regarding consumer data privacy, and called on Congress to "extend the HIPAA individual right of access and amendment to non-HIPAA Covered Entities that manage individual health data, such as mHealth and health social media applications. The goal is uniformity of data access policy, regardless of covered entity, business associate, or other commercial status."
 
Moreover, the groups said regulators should clarify existing regulatory guidance related, for example, to third-party legal requests, such as those by lawyers looking for information without appropriate patient permissions.

ON THE RECORD
"Congress has long prioritized patients' right to access their data as a key lever to improve care, enable research, and empower patients to live healthy lifestyles," said Dr. Doug Fridsma, president and CEO and AMIA. "But enacting these policies into regulations and translating these regulations to practice has proven more difficult than Congress imagined."

"AHIMA's members are most aware of patient challenges in accessing their data as they operationalize the process for access across the healthcare landscape," said AHIMA CEO Wylecia Wiggs Harris, in a statement. "The language in HIPAA complicates these efforts in an electronic world."

Twitter: @MikeMiliardHITN
Email the writer: mike.miliard@himssmedia.com

Healthcare IT News is a publication of HIMSS Media. 

]]>
NIH-funded tissue chips rocket to International Space Station http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-funded-tissue-chips-rocket-international-space-station http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-funded-tissue-chips-rocket-international-space-station Tue, 04 Dec 2018 18:45:00 CST NIH News Release Research in microgravity could produce new insights about aging process. ]]> Ibrutinib plus rituximab superior to standard treatment for some patients with chronic leukemia http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/ibrutinib-plus-rituximab-superior-standard-treatment-some-patients-chronic-leukemia http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/ibrutinib-plus-rituximab-superior-standard-treatment-some-patients-chronic-leukemia Tue, 04 Dec 2018 15:30:00 CST NIH News Release Chronic lymphocytic leukemia is one of the most common types of leukemia in adults typically occurring during or after middle age and rarely occurring in individuals under the age of 40. ]]> NIH researcher presents encouraging results for gene therapy for severe sickle cell disease http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-researcher-presents-encouraging-results-gene-therapy-severe-sickle-cell-disease http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-researcher-presents-encouraging-results-gene-therapy-severe-sickle-cell-disease Tue, 04 Dec 2018 13:00:00 CST NIH News Release This study is part of decades of research on sickle cell disease that have opened the door to novel genetic approaches to curative therapies. ]]> Romania's path toward digitizing healthcare http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/video/romanias-path-toward-digitizing-healthcare http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/video/romanias-path-toward-digitizing-healthcare Tue, 04 Dec 2018 11:38:31 CST jfinison at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy Primary topic: Government & PolicyPrimary Topic: Data WarehousingAdditional Topics: DataData ManagementPolicyPolicySpecific Terms: Data WarehousingCustom Tags: Data WarehousingDisable Auto Tagging: Short Headline: Romania's path toward digitizing healthcareFeatured Decision Content: 
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ABCD study completes enrollment, announces opportunities for scientific engagement http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/abcd-study-completes-enrollment-announces-opportunities-scientific-engagement http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/abcd-study-completes-enrollment-announces-opportunities-scientific-engagement Mon, 03 Dec 2018 15:00:00 CST NIH News Release The study will use advanced neuroimaging to observe brain development in children throughout adolescence. ]]> How a scribe tool linked to Epic EHR is helping ease physician burnout http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/how-scribe-tool-linked-epic-ehr-helping-ease-physician-burnout http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/how-scribe-tool-linked-epic-ehr-helping-ease-physician-burnout Mon, 03 Dec 2018 14:02:25 CST at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com Some doctors at Massachusetts General Physicians Organization have saved more than two hours per clinical session with virtual scribe technology. Can Singapore shift from a fee-for-service to value-based healthcare system? http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/can-singapore-shift-fee-service-value-based-healthcare-system http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/can-singapore-shift-fee-service-value-based-healthcare-system Sat, 01 Dec 2018 22:06:43 CST deankoh at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy In the book Affordable Excellence: The Singapore Healthcare System by William A. Haseltine published in 2013, the author noted that Singapore “ranks sixth in the world” in terms of healthcare outcomes, while “spend[ing] less on healthcare than any other high-income country”. When compared with other countries, Singapore ranks high on value-based indices - A 2014 EIU white paper that looked at health outcomes and costs across 166 countries ranked Singapore second after Japan, noting that it had achieved similar outcomes to Japan’s but with a significantly lower investment. One of the key pillars behind Singapore’s remarkable success in delivering affordable and high-quality healthcare since its independence in 1965 is the government’s approach to healthcare improvement and care as an integral and inseparable part of the overall development planning for the country, Haseltine explains in the first chapter of his book. In November 2017, the Ministry of Health introduced the ‘3 Beyonds Strategy’ to keep healthcare in Singapore to keep healthcare in Singapore good and affordable. They are: (i) Beyond Healthcare to Health (ii) Beyond Hospital to Community (iii) Beyond Quality to Value With an aging population and increasing costs and burden of healthcare in Singapore, the “Beyond Quality to Value” strategy becomes essential to retain or increase quality of care while ensuring value for money. The Agency for Care Effectiveness (ACE) was set up in 2015 to research treatments that provide the best value for money. For instance, three drugs may offer the same results, but have very different prices. Or a drug may be more expensive, but offer outcomes that are far better than cheaper alternative drugs. Webinar: Compliance as code: Automate compliance using open source technology In the long run, the conventional method of fee for service-based care that works on a basis of volume and treating illnesses and injuries as they occur is also not tenable – hospitals and healthcare organisations cannot expand their capacities indefinitely and there is already an existing manpower crunch of qualified professionals in the healthcare sector.   Treating illnesses and diseases when they occur is often expensive and unpleasant for patients – therefore, the proverb, “prevention is better than cure” is especially relevant. The “Beyond Healthcare to Health” strategy has seen the Health Promotion Board (HPB) ramping up efforts for people to become healthier and more active, through initiatives such as the National Steps Challenge (currently in its forth season) and Healthier Dining Programme. Value-based care prioritises health outcomes that matter to patients relative to the cost of achieving those outcomes. This is also related to “Beyond Hospital to Community” strategy in which patients can receive appropriate care community or at home so they can stay well and avoid frequent hospital admissions. This is better for them in terms of health and convenience, and for the healthcare system too, as hospital care is very expensive. The transition from a fee for service-based to a value-based healthcare system may not be an easy journey for many healthcare providers and organisations but it also presents many opportunities to relook existing approaches to healthcare, not just in the delivery of patient-centric care but also in aspects such as financing models and leveraging technologies such as AI to provide value to both patients and clinicians while reducing costs. With the theme of “Disruptive innovation for Value-based healthcare”, the HIMSS Singapore eHealth & Health 2.0 Summit held from 23-24 April 2019 at Marina Mandarin Singapore will feature six main topics related to achieving value-based healthcare: (i) Population health (ii) Healthcare revenue cycle (iii) Patient outcomes (iv) Acute-to-community (v) Cybersecurity; and (vi) Artificial intelligence The HIMSS Singapore eHealth & Health 2.0 Summit will be a great opportunity for like-minded healthcare leaders and professionals in Singapore and abroad to come together to tackle some of the major challenges and opportunities in moving towards a value-based healthcare system.

In the book Affordable Excellence: The Singapore Healthcare System by William A. Haseltine published in 2013, the author noted that Singapore “ranks sixth in the world” in terms of healthcare outcomes, while “spend[ing] less on healthcare than any other high-income country”. When compared with other countries, Singapore ranks high on value-based indices - A 2014 EIU white paper that looked at health outcomes and costs across 166 countries ranked Singapore second after Japan, noting that it had achieved similar outcomes to Japan’s but with a significantly lower investment.

One of the key pillars behind Singapore’s remarkable success in delivering affordable and high-quality healthcare since its independence in 1965 is the government’s approach to healthcare improvement and care as an integral and inseparable part of the overall development planning for the country, Haseltine explains in the first chapter of his book.

In November 2017, the Ministry of Health introduced the ‘3 Beyonds Strategy’ to keep healthcare in Singapore to keep healthcare in Singapore good and affordable. They are:
(i) Beyond Healthcare to Health
(ii) Beyond Hospital to Community
(iii) Beyond Quality to Value

With an aging population and increasing costs and burden of healthcare in Singapore, the “Beyond Quality to Value” strategy becomes essential to retain or increase quality of care while ensuring value for money. The Agency for Care Effectiveness (ACE) was set up in 2015 to research treatments that provide the best value for money. For instance, three drugs may offer the same results, but have very different prices. Or a drug may be more expensive, but offer outcomes that are far better than cheaper alternative drugs.

In the long run, the conventional method of fee for service-based care that works on a basis of volume and treating illnesses and injuries as they occur is also not tenable – hospitals and healthcare organisations cannot expand their capacities indefinitely and there is already an existing manpower crunch of qualified professionals in the healthcare sector.

 

Treating illnesses and diseases when they occur is often expensive and unpleasant for patients – therefore, the proverb, “prevention is better than cure” is especially relevant. The “Beyond Healthcare to Health” strategy has seen the Health Promotion Board (HPB) ramping up efforts for people to become healthier and more active, through initiatives such as the National Steps Challenge (currently in its forth season) and Healthier Dining Programme.

Value-based care prioritises health outcomes that matter to patients relative to the cost of achieving those outcomes. This is also related to “Beyond Hospital to Community” strategy in which patients can receive appropriate care community or at home so they can stay well and avoid frequent hospital admissions. This is better for them in terms of health and convenience, and for the healthcare system too, as hospital care is very expensive.

The transition from a fee for service-based to a value-based healthcare system may not be an easy journey for many healthcare providers and organisations but it also presents many opportunities to relook existing approaches to healthcare, not just in the delivery of patient-centric care but also in aspects such as financing models and leveraging technologies such as AI to provide value to both patients and clinicians while reducing costs.

With the theme of “Disruptive innovation for Value-based healthcare”, the HIMSS Singapore eHealth & Health 2.0 Summit held from 23-24 April 2019 at Marina Mandarin Singapore will feature six main topics related to achieving value-based healthcare:
(i) Population health
(ii) Healthcare revenue cycle
(iii) Patient outcomes
(iv) Acute-to-community
(v) Cybersecurity; and
(vi) Artificial intelligence

The HIMSS Singapore eHealth & Health 2.0 Summit will be a great opportunity for like-minded healthcare leaders and professionals in Singapore and abroad to come together to tackle some of the major challenges and opportunities in moving towards a value-based healthcare system.

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NIH Statement on World AIDS Day December 1, 2018 http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-statement-world-aids-day-december-1-2018 http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-statement-world-aids-day-december-1-2018 Fri, 30 Nov 2018 14:45:00 CST NIH News Release We now have life-saving antiretroviral drugs to treat and greatly extend the lives of men and women living with HIV. ]]> Meeting the challenge of engaging men in HIV prevention and treatment http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/meeting-challenge-engaging-men-hiv-prevention-treatment http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/meeting-challenge-engaging-men-hiv-prevention-treatment Fri, 30 Nov 2018 13:30:00 CST NIH News Release NIH commentary describes innovative strategies for reaching men. ]]> Lyft hires healthcare VP with health IT chops http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/lyft-hires-healthcare-vp-health-it-chops http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/lyft-hires-healthcare-vp-health-it-chops Thu, 29 Nov 2018 10:25:33 CST at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com Company appoints former Change, McKesson top executive Megan Callahan. ONC names winning software for EHR reporting challenge http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/onc-names-winning-software-ehr-reporting-challenge http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/onc-names-winning-software-ehr-reporting-challenge Thu, 29 Nov 2018 09:04:33 CST mmiliard at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has announced the winners of a new challenge to develop software for identifying and reporting safety and usability issues in EHRs in a way that doesn’t disrupt clinical workflow. The winning tools aim to make it easy to report IT issues within the healthcare workflow: giving feedback to developers and guiding the formation of best practices. The hope is to targeting usability challenges before they become major problems. Three winners were announced: The James Madison Advisory Group came in first, with a hotkey that allows a clinician to document an issue without leaving their EHR and which simplifies the process of reporting issues. Pegwin, in second place, developed an intuitive reporting system that allows a user to document an issue “in as few as three clicks.” Jared Schwartz and team came in third with a Google Chrome plugin which integrates with common IT ticketing platforms, making it easy to work into existing systems. The winners received $45,000, $25,000, and $10,000 respectively. WHY IT MATTERS Like any software, EHRs sometimes have flaws or malfunctions. An already busy clinician who is trying to manage a full patient load, perform diagnostic work and enter data usually doesn’t have time to document and report safety or usability issues to his or her IT department. Webinar: Improving Patient Matching in your EHR: A Case Study Finding a way to work tools into the care workflow that allow practitioners to capture and share potential safety and usage concerns results in greater efficiency without disrupting a clinical workflow. "Improving the safety of health IT remains an important priority," said Dr. Andy Gettinger, ONC chief clinical officer. "We believe that making it easier for end users to report will help in that goal." THE LARGER TREND EHRs have the potential to be the first point of data capture in a new landscape of precision care. First, though, they need to win over physicians who see them as cumbersome and byzantine replacements to the old pen and paper methods. Some healthcare systems are focusing on identifying those problems and addressing them to enhance the value of their EHR systems. Practitioners are experiencing EHR burnout – something ONC has also recently been working to help combat – where poor usability or other IT safety concerns can have a detrimental impact on effective patient care. ON THE RECORD "Helping reduce the burden of health IT continues to be a key area of focus at the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, and we anticipate the winning submissions to the Easy EHR Issue Reporting Challenge will help with those efforts," said ONC chief Dr. Don Rucker. Benjamin Harris is a Maine-based freelance writer and and former new media producer for HIMSS Media. Twitter: @BenzoHarris.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has announced the winners of a new challenge to develop software for identifying and reporting safety and usability issues in EHRs in a way that doesn’t disrupt clinical workflow.

The winning tools aim to make it easy to report IT issues within the healthcare workflow: giving feedback to developers and guiding the formation of best practices. The hope is to targeting usability challenges before they become major problems.

Three winners were announced:

  • The James Madison Advisory Group came in first, with a hotkey that allows a clinician to document an issue without leaving their EHR and which simplifies the process of reporting issues.
  • Pegwin, in second place, developed an intuitive reporting system that allows a user to document an issue “in as few as three clicks.”
  • Jared Schwartz and team came in third with a Google Chrome plugin which integrates with common IT ticketing platforms, making it easy to work into existing systems. The winners received $45,000, $25,000, and $10,000 respectively.

WHY IT MATTERS
Like any software, EHRs sometimes have flaws or malfunctions. An already busy clinician who is trying to manage a full patient load, perform diagnostic work and enter data usually doesn’t have time to document and report safety or usability issues to his or her IT department.

Finding a way to work tools into the care workflow that allow practitioners to capture and share potential safety and usage concerns results in greater efficiency without disrupting a clinical workflow.

"Improving the safety of health IT remains an important priority," said Dr. Andy Gettinger, ONC chief clinical officer. "We believe that making it easier for end users to report will help in that goal."

THE LARGER TREND
EHRs have the potential to be the first point of data capture in a new landscape of precision care. First, though, they need to win over physicians who see them as cumbersome and byzantine replacements to the old pen and paper methods.

Some healthcare systems are focusing on identifying those problems and addressing them to enhance the value of their EHR systems. Practitioners are experiencing EHR burnout – something ONC has also recently been working to help combat – where poor usability or other IT safety concerns can have a detrimental impact on effective patient care.

ON THE RECORD
"Helping reduce the burden of health IT continues to be a key area of focus at the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, and we anticipate the winning submissions to the Easy EHR Issue Reporting Challenge will help with those efforts," said ONC chief Dr. Don Rucker.

Benjamin Harris is a Maine-based freelance writer and and former new media producer for HIMSS Media.
Twitter: @BenzoHarris.

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ONC names winning software for EHR reporting challenge http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/onc-names-winning-software-ehr-reporting-challenge http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/onc-names-winning-software-ehr-reporting-challenge Thu, 29 Nov 2018 09:04:33 CST at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has announced the winners of a new challenge to develop software for identifying and reporting safety and usability issues in EHRs in a way that doesn’t disrupt clinical workflow. 13 NHS trusts in England to receive a share of £16m for e-prescribing http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/13-nhs-trusts-england-receive-share-£16m-e-prescribing http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/13-nhs-trusts-england-receive-share-£16m-e-prescribing Wed, 28 Nov 2018 15:09:34 CST lpostelnicu at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy Thirteen NHS trusts in England providing a mixture of acute, mental health and community services will receive a share of £16m to speed up implementation of e-prescribing. Former Secretary of State for Health and Social Care Jeremy Hunt announced back in February that £78m would be made available to help trusts move away from paper prescriptions, after a study found that an estimated 237 million medication errors occur in the NHS in England every year. "This is a large number, but 72 per cent have little/ no potential for harm. It is likely that many errors are picked up before they reach the patient, but we do not know how many," researchers from the York, Manchester and Sheffield universities wrote in the analysis. A Short Life Working Group established in September 2017 found that electronic prescribing and medicines administration systems were some of the "most challenging digital health systems to implement in provider organisations". Figures from November 2017 indicated that 35 per cent of acute trusts and less than 12 per cent of mental health organisations had rolled out an ePMA system. Webinar: How Chief Digital Officers Can Boost Digital Transformation “There is evidence that electronic prescribing and medicines administration systems will improve safety for patients, reducing the risk of harm and ensuring high quality efficient patient care which is as safe as possible,” said Andrew Davies, NHS Improvement Director of Hospital Pharmacy. The thirteen trusts to receive the funding are: Bolton NHS Foundation Trust (£1.02m) The Rotherham NHS Foundation Trust (£750,000) Mid Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust (£1.6m) Humber NHS Foundation Trust (£300,000) Northern Lincolnshire and Goole NHS Foundation Trust (£940,000) Kettering General Hospital NHS Foundation Trust (£820,000) University Hospitals of North Midlands NHS Trust (£2.19m) Barts Health NHS Trust (£1.7m) East London NHS Foundation Trust (£740,000) East Kent Hospitals University NHS Foundation Trust (£1.45m)   Frimley Health NHS Foundation Trust (£1.17m) Buckinghamshire Healthcare NHS Trust (£1.62m) East Sussex Healthcare NHS Trust (£1.7m). Twitter: @1Leontina Contact the author: lpostelnicu@himss.org

Thirteen NHS trusts in England providing a mixture of acute, mental health and community services will receive a share of £16m to speed up implementation of e-prescribing.

Former Secretary of State for Health and Social Care Jeremy Hunt announced back in February that £78m would be made available to help trusts move away from paper prescriptions, after a study found that an estimated 237 million medication errors occur in the NHS in England every year.

"This is a large number, but 72 per cent have little/ no potential for harm. It is likely that many errors are picked up before they reach the patient, but we do not know how many," researchers from the York, Manchester and Sheffield universities wrote in the analysis.

Short Life Working Group established in September 2017 found that electronic prescribing and medicines administration systems were some of the "most challenging digital health systems to implement in provider organisations". Figures from November 2017 indicated that 35 per cent of acute trusts and less than 12 per cent of mental health organisations had rolled out an ePMA system.

“There is evidence that electronic prescribing and medicines administration systems will improve safety for patients, reducing the risk of harm and ensuring high quality efficient patient care which is as safe as possible,” said Andrew Davies, NHS Improvement Director of Hospital Pharmacy.

The thirteen trusts to receive the funding are:

  • Bolton NHS Foundation Trust (£1.02m)
  • The Rotherham NHS Foundation Trust (£750,000)
  • Mid Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust (£1.6m)
  • Humber NHS Foundation Trust (£300,000)
  • Northern Lincolnshire and Goole NHS Foundation Trust (£940,000)
  • Kettering General Hospital NHS Foundation Trust (£820,000)
  • University Hospitals of North Midlands NHS Trust (£2.19m)
  • Barts Health NHS Trust (£1.7m)
  • East London NHS Foundation Trust (£740,000)
  • East Kent Hospitals University NHS Foundation Trust (£1.45m)  
  • Frimley Health NHS Foundation Trust (£1.17m)
  • Buckinghamshire Healthcare NHS Trust (£1.62m)
  • East Sussex Healthcare NHS Trust (£1.7m).

Twitter: @1Leontina
Contact the author: lpostelnicu@himss.org

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Atrium Health breach: Data from 2.65M patients potentially exposed http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/atrium-health-breach-data-265m-patients-potentially-exposed http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/atrium-health-breach-data-265m-patients-potentially-exposed Wed, 28 Nov 2018 14:25:58 CST at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com A billing vendor, AccuDoc Solutions, told the health system in October that a third-party had gained access to its data for about a week in September. CMS, ONC unveil new strategy to reduce burdens in EHRs http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/cms-onc-unveil-new-strategy-reduce-burdens-ehrs http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/cms-onc-unveil-new-strategy-reduce-burdens-ehrs Wed, 28 Nov 2018 12:57:06 CST mmiliard at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, through ONC and CMS, has released its draft strategy on reducing regulatory and ease-of-use burdens in electronic health records. While EHRs have countless benefits, physicians have made clear their long-simmering frustration with the layers of documentation and regulatory requirements they have to meet – which adversely impacts the time they have to interact with patients. The 21s Century Cures Act, therefore, required HHS to examine the issue and develop a strategy to respond to it. WHY IT MATTERS Because so much documentation is now required in healthcare and because EHRs make it so easy to enter more data through templates, checkboxes and copy and pasting, many systems are experiencing note bloat.Many care providers say they're often spending more time entering data into the EHR than they are practicing medicine. Additionally, the profusion of unnecessary notes make it much more difficult to find relevant patient information. This draft strategy acknowledges that while the amount of information at physician fingertips is greater than it ever has been, work still needs to be done to improve EHR design and to reduce the time and reporting requirements for data entry. It lays out "three overarching goals designed to reduce clinician burden," as ONC and CMS noted in a Nov. 28 blog post: Reduce the effort and time required to record health information in EHRs for clinicians; Reduce the effort and time required to meet regulatory reporting requirements for clinicians, hospitals, and health care organizations; and Improve the functionality and intuitiveness (ease of use) of EHRs. "Electronic health records have several advantages over paper-based records, from improving continuity of care during a natural disaster to enabling more reliable prescribing," said Dr. Andrew Gettinger of ONC and Dr. Kate Goodrich, of CMS in the co-written post. "While EHRs can also improve care delivery, quality, and outcomes, many clinicians have told us, and their members of Congress, that EHRs can make it difficult to provide effective patient care." THE LARGER TREND Despite their required use and the promise that they will modernize healthcare, many EHRs are still struggling to be more functional and intuitive. Hospitals and health systems that implement them well can cut costs and improve care – as long as they do so with physician input. Because of the distractions they can present in the form of poor information design or pop-up alerts, electronic systems can actually become more burdensome than the traditional pen and paper method of record-keeping. If these encumbrances aren’t properly addressed, they can even lead to safety risks for patients. ON THE RECORD "Information technology has automated processes in every industry except health care, where the introduction of EHRs resulted in additional burden on clinicians," said Dr. Don Rucker, national coordinator for health information technology, in a statement, calling for public input on the draft plan. "Health IT tools need to be intuitive and functional so that clinicians can focus on their patients and not documentation." "With the significant growth in EHRs comes frustration caused, in many cases, by regulatory and administrative requirements stacked on top of one another," added HHS Secretary Alex Azar. "Addressing the challenge of health IT burden and making EHRs useful for patients and providers, as the solutions in this draft report aim to do, will help pave the way for value-based transformation." Benjamin Harris is a Maine-based freelance writer and and former new media producer for HIMSS Media. Twitter: @BenzoHarris.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, through ONC and CMS, has released its draft strategy on reducing regulatory and ease-of-use burdens in electronic health records.

While EHRs have countless benefits, physicians have made clear their long-simmering frustration with the layers of documentation and regulatory requirements they have to meet – which adversely impacts the time they have to interact with patients. The 21s Century Cures Act, therefore, required HHS to examine the issue and develop a strategy to respond to it.

WHY IT MATTERS
Because so much documentation is now required in healthcare and because EHRs make it so easy to enter more data through templates, checkboxes and copy and pasting, many systems are experiencing note bloat.Many care providers say they're often spending more time entering data into the EHR than they are practicing medicine.

Additionally, the profusion of unnecessary notes make it much more difficult to find relevant patient information.

This draft strategy acknowledges that while the amount of information at physician fingertips is greater than it ever has been, work still needs to be done to improve EHR design and to reduce the time and reporting requirements for data entry. It lays out "three overarching goals designed to reduce clinician burden," as ONC and CMS noted in a Nov. 28 blog post:

  • Reduce the effort and time required to record health information in EHRs for clinicians;
  • Reduce the effort and time required to meet regulatory reporting requirements for clinicians, hospitals, and health care organizations; and
  • Improve the functionality and intuitiveness (ease of use) of EHRs.

"Electronic health records have several advantages over paper-based records, from improving continuity of care during a natural disaster to enabling more reliable prescribing," said Dr. Andrew Gettinger of ONC and Dr. Kate Goodrich, of CMS in the co-written post. "While EHRs can also improve care delivery, quality, and outcomes, many clinicians have told us, and their members of Congress, that EHRs can make it difficult to provide effective patient care."

THE LARGER TREND
Despite their required use and the promise that they will modernize healthcare, many EHRs are still struggling to be more functional and intuitive. Hospitals and health systems that implement them well can cut costs and improve care – as long as they do so with physician input.

Because of the distractions they can present in the form of poor information design or pop-up alerts, electronic systems can actually become more burdensome than the traditional pen and paper method of record-keeping. If these encumbrances aren’t properly addressed, they can even lead to safety risks for patients.

ON THE RECORD
"Information technology has automated processes in every industry except health care, where the introduction of EHRs resulted in additional burden on clinicians," said Dr. Don Rucker, national coordinator for health information technology, in a statement, calling for public input on the draft plan. "Health IT tools need to be intuitive and functional so that clinicians can focus on their patients and not documentation."

"With the significant growth in EHRs comes frustration caused, in many cases, by regulatory and administrative requirements stacked on top of one another," added HHS Secretary Alex Azar. "Addressing the challenge of health IT burden and making EHRs useful for patients and providers, as the solutions in this draft report aim to do, will help pave the way for value-based transformation."

Benjamin Harris is a Maine-based freelance writer and and former new media producer for HIMSS Media.
Twitter: @BenzoHarris.

]]>
HIMSS names the 2019 Most Influential Women in Health IT Award recipients http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/himss-names-2019-most-influential-women-health-it-award-recipients http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/himss-names-2019-most-influential-women-health-it-award-recipients Tue, 27 Nov 2018 08:30:25 CST at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com Third annual recognition honors experts setting an example for everyone when it comes to advancing health information and technology. HHS names first DSIIS meeting participants and date to unlock obstacles to health IT investing and innovation http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/hhs-names-first-dsiis-meeting-participants-and-date-unlock-obstacles-health-it-investing-and http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/hhs-names-first-dsiis-meeting-participants-and-date-unlock-obstacles-health-it-investing-and Mon, 26 Nov 2018 11:44:53 CST tsullivan at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services announced that Dec. 18, 2018 will be the first quarterly meeting of the Deputy Secretary’s Innovation and Investment Summit (DSIIS). Deputy Secretary Eric Hargan announced the yearlong collaboration of stakeholders -- including HHS officials -- who will discuss ways to accelerate healthcare IT innovation in September. Participants in the Dec. 18 DSIIS meeting will kick off the initiative by identifying areas of interest to be explored and discussed in future meetings, as well as providing their perspectives on healthcare innovation and investment. HHS said working groups may also evolve out of DSIIS. HHS selected the DSIIS participants from among applications it received Sept. 19 through Oct. 3, based on the applicants’ experience, knowledge and leadership in innovation and investment in the healthcare sector. WHY IT MATTERS DSIIS will produce “high-level dialogues” between HHS officials and private sector innovators, driving new investments in health IT. Deputy Secretary Hargan said the initiative is the first time HHS has reached out to investors to understand what is holding innovation back. Webinar: What Innovation Means to Healthcare and Why it Matters Today THE BIGGER TREND Hargan has said that HHS sees the investment community’s buy-in on health IT innovation as key for bringing about the wellbeing of the American people. As part of the initiative, on May 24, HHS held Startup Day in Chicago, to bring together government agencies and prospective health IT investors. HHS is working with Healthbox, a HIMSS innovation company and sister unit of Healthcare IT News, to help better understand the barriers to innovation. ON THE RECORD In mid October Hargan told us: "This is going to be the first time we formally engage the investment community. We work with providers, payers, pharma, medical device companies all the time – but we never talk to the people who are funding those to understand their challenges."  WHAT OTHERS INVOLVED IN HHS INNOVATION INITIATIVES HAVE TO SAY ALL THE PARTICIPANTS SLATED FOR DECEMBER 18 HHS on its website listed all the digital health leaders who it considers “initial DSIIS core participants.” Anna Haghgooie-Managing Director, Sandbox Industries Annie Lamont-Managing Director, Oak HC/FT Anthony Davis-Co-Founder and President, Linden Partners Barry Uphoff-Founder and Managing Partner, Martis Capital Bill Geary-Co-Founder and Partner, Flare Capital Brian Thompson-CEO, UnitedHealthcare Medicare & Retirement Dean Harrison-President and CEO, Northwestern Memorial HealthCare Ezra Perlman-Co-President, Francisco Partners Jim Rogers-Chair, Department of Business Development, Mayo Clinic Matt Hermann-Senior Managing Director, Ascension Ventures Mo Makhzoumi-Head of Global Health, New Enterprise Associates Robbert Vorhoff-Managing Director and Global Head of Healthcare, General Atlantic Scott Hilinski–Managing Director, Nautic Partners Stephen Kraus-Partner, Bessemer Ventures Todd Fruchterman-President/GM, 3M 

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services announced that Dec. 18, 2018 will be the first quarterly meeting of the Deputy Secretary’s Innovation and Investment Summit (DSIIS).

Deputy Secretary Eric Hargan announced the yearlong collaboration of stakeholders -- including HHS officials -- who will discuss ways to accelerate healthcare IT innovation in September.

Participants in the Dec. 18 DSIIS meeting will kick off the initiative by identifying areas of interest to be explored and discussed in future meetings, as well as providing their perspectives on healthcare innovation and investment. HHS said working groups may also evolve out of DSIIS.

HHS selected the DSIIS participants from among applications it received Sept. 19 through Oct. 3, based on the applicants’ experience, knowledge and leadership in innovation and investment in the healthcare sector.

WHY IT MATTERS

DSIIS will produce “high-level dialogues” between HHS officials and private sector innovators, driving new investments in health IT. Deputy Secretary Hargan said the initiative is the first time HHS has reached out to investors to understand what is holding innovation back.

THE BIGGER TREND

Hargan has said that HHS sees the investment community’s buy-in on health IT innovation as key for bringing about the wellbeing of the American people. As part of the initiative, on May 24, HHS held Startup Day in Chicago, to bring together government agencies and prospective health IT investors.

HHS is working with Healthbox, a HIMSS innovation company and sister unit of Healthcare IT News, to help better understand the barriers to innovation.

ON THE RECORD

In mid October Hargan told us: "This is going to be the first time we formally engage the investment community. We work with providers, payers, pharma, medical device companies all the time – but we never talk to the people who are funding those to understand their challenges." 

WHAT OTHERS INVOLVED IN HHS INNOVATION INITIATIVES HAVE TO SAY

ALL THE PARTICIPANTS SLATED FOR DECEMBER 18

HHS on its website listed all the digital health leaders who it considers “initial DSIIS core participants.”

Anna Haghgooie-Managing Director, Sandbox Industries

Annie Lamont-Managing Director, Oak HC/FT

Anthony Davis-Co-Founder and President, Linden Partners

Barry Uphoff-Founder and Managing Partner, Martis Capital

Bill Geary-Co-Founder and Partner, Flare Capital

Brian Thompson-CEO, UnitedHealthcare Medicare & Retirement

Dean Harrison-President and CEO, Northwestern Memorial HealthCare

Ezra Perlman-Co-President, Francisco Partners

Jim Rogers-Chair, Department of Business Development, Mayo Clinic

Matt Hermann-Senior Managing Director, Ascension Ventures

Mo Makhzoumi-Head of Global Health, New Enterprise Associates

Robbert Vorhoff-Managing Director and Global Head of Healthcare, General Atlantic

Scott Hilinski–Managing Director, Nautic Partners

Stephen Kraus-Partner, Bessemer Ventures

Todd Fruchterman-President/GM, 3M 

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Malaysia to implement EMR at 145 hospitals nationwide in the next three years http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/malaysia-implement-emr-145-hospitals-nationwide-next-three-years http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/malaysia-implement-emr-145-hospitals-nationwide-next-three-years Sun, 25 Nov 2018 21:34:01 CST deankoh at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy “In order to improve the country's health service to a better level, the Ministry of Health is committed to ensuring that the electronic medical record system (EMR) can be realised within three years at 145 hospitals nationwide,” said Malaysian Health Minister Datuk Seri Dr Dzulkefly Ahmad. He spoke to the media after the Luncheon Talk at Menara Razak, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM) on 8 November 2018. Dr Dzulkefly added that 20 percent of the hospitals in Malaysia already have the EMR system in place, including Selayang Hospital and Ampang Hospital in Selangor but it is still not fully operational. “We want to follow the best examples, such as in Turkey that have end-to-end solutions, good hospital information, and efficient track and trace for medicines that they have zero counterfeit (medicines).” Webinar: Leveraging Cloud to Revolutionize Health IT and Transform Your EMR System In a recent interview with HIMSS TV at the HIMSS Eurasia Conference in Istanbul, Dr Dzulkefly said, “It is important to me that I do not solve the problems (of healthcare) in a piecemeal manner but approach them methodologically. Until you as someone who is providing the leadership knows exactly what it takes to realise further infrastructure that needs to be there and of course together with infrastructure realising what change you would need to undertake and how your human resources can adapt to it by way of change management…then finally you would understand how the whole system would work.”   As the newly appointed Health Minister of Malaysia since May 2018, Dr Dzulkefly also said that it is important the leadership must have the grasp and understanding of hospital infrastructure as well as clinical outcomes – otherwise there will lots of government spending with no tangible improvements and problems will still be solved in a piecemeal manner.

“In order to improve the country's health service to a better level, the Ministry of Health is committed to ensuring that the electronic medical record system (EMR) can be realised within three years at 145 hospitals nationwide,” said Malaysian Health Minister Datuk Seri Dr Dzulkefly Ahmad.

He spoke to the media after the Luncheon Talk at Menara Razak, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM) on 8 November 2018. Dr Dzulkefly added that 20 percent of the hospitals in Malaysia already have the EMR system in place, including Selayang Hospital and Ampang Hospital in Selangor but it is still not fully operational.

“We want to follow the best examples, such as in Turkey that have end-to-end solutions, good hospital information, and efficient track and trace for medicines that they have zero counterfeit (medicines).”

In a recent interview with HIMSS TV at the HIMSS Eurasia Conference in Istanbul, Dr Dzulkefly said, “It is important to me that I do not solve the problems (of healthcare) in a piecemeal manner but approach them methodologically. Until you as someone who is providing the leadership knows exactly what it takes to realise further infrastructure that needs to be there and of course together with infrastructure realising what change you would need to undertake and how your human resources can adapt to it by way of change management…then finally you would understand how the whole system would work.”

 

As the newly appointed Health Minister of Malaysia since May 2018, Dr Dzulkefly also said that it is important the leadership must have the grasp and understanding of hospital infrastructure as well as clinical outcomes – otherwise there will lots of government spending with no tangible improvements and problems will still be solved in a piecemeal manner.

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Malaysia to implement EMR at 145 hospitals nationwide in the next three years http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/malaysia-implement-emr-145-hospitals-nationwide-next-three-years http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/malaysia-implement-emr-145-hospitals-nationwide-next-three-years Sun, 25 Nov 2018 21:34:01 CST at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com Health Minister Datuk Seri Dr Dzulkefly Ahmad also said in a recent HIMSS TV interview that even if an organisation has a good programme and system in place, digitising healthcare will not succeed if there is no clinical buy-in underpinned by training. Amazon, Berkshire, JPMorgan venture hires BCBS IT exec Dana Safran for data-driven position http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/amazon-berkshire-jpmorgan-venture-hires-bcbs-it-exec-dana-safran-data-driven-position http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/amazon-berkshire-jpmorgan-venture-hires-bcbs-it-exec-dana-safran-data-driven-position Tue, 20 Nov 2018 10:33:05 CST at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com The healthcare venture formed by Amazon, Berkshire Hathaway and JPMorgan Chase has hired insurance executive Dana Gelb Safran as head of measurement, a data-driven technology position, according to CNBC. Big things ahead for blockchain in healthcare, new report shows http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/big-things-ahead-blockchain-healthcare-new-report-shows http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/big-things-ahead-blockchain-healthcare-new-report-shows Mon, 19 Nov 2018 13:25:36 CST at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com Advice for hospitals: Making inroads on blockchain now, with smaller projects that don't involve patient data, can help prepare them for larger opportunities ahead. Health system moves from text-only to AI-powered interactive multimedia radiology reports http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/health-system-moves-text-only-ai-powered-interactive-multimedia-radiology-reports http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/health-system-moves-text-only-ai-powered-interactive-multimedia-radiology-reports Mon, 12 Nov 2018 12:41:55 CST at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com The University of Virginia Health System wanted to create interactive multimedia reports, believing that radiologists could communicate better through the use of enriched and interactive content. Athenahealth to be acquired for $5.7B by Veritas Capital and Elliott subsidiary http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/athenahealth-be-acquired-57b-veritas-capital-and-elliott-subsidiary http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/athenahealth-be-acquired-57b-veritas-capital-and-elliott-subsidiary Mon, 12 Nov 2018 08:44:35 CST at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com The company will be combined with Veritas-owned Virence Health, but will continue operating under the athenahealth name and keep its Watertown, Massachusetts, headquarters. Virence CEO Bob Segert will lead it. Physicians should think twice about promoting medical credit cards to their patients http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/finance-experts-warn-medical-credit-cards?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/finance-experts-warn-medical-credit-cards?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Tue, 20 Feb 2018 10:15:20 CST Joanne Finnegan at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Consumers use credit cards to pay for everything (including the kitchen sink), and the latest trend has people using medical credit cards to pay for healthcare services. But financial experts are warning practices about the pitfalls of promoting so-called medical credit cards to their patients, says the Healthcare Financial Management Association. Trump administration issues proposed rule to expand short-term insurance plans http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/trump-administration-short-term-insurance-rule?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/trump-administration-short-term-insurance-rule?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Tue, 20 Feb 2018 09:56:31 CST Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare A proposed rule issued by three federal agencies on Tuesday would expand limits for short-term health insurance plans from three months to 12 months. CMS's Seema Verma dismissed concerns that the policy shift would destabilize the individual market by siphoning off healthy individuals, arguing the change will have "virtually no impact" on ACA premiums. Under Trump, HHS rolls back policies aimed at protecting LGBT rights http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/trump-hhs-lgbt-rights-alex-azar?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/trump-hhs-lgbt-rights-alex-azar?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Tue, 20 Feb 2018 09:31:52 CST Leslie Small at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Though President Donald Trump promised to support LGBT causes during the 2016 campaign, under his watch the Department of Health and Human Services had rolled back several initiatives aimed at protecting the rights of that population. New HHS Secretary Alex Azar could take the department in a different direction. Study: Community navigators can reduce the high cost of 'superusers' in hospital settings http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/patient-engagement/community-navigators-superusers-hospital-visits-decrease?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/patient-engagement/community-navigators-superusers-hospital-visits-decrease?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Tue, 20 Feb 2018 09:08:46 CST Paige Minemyer at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare "Superusers," those costly patients who utilize high levels of hospital care, are a significant burden on the healthcare system. But a new study suggests that pairing them with community navigators can reduce their use of hospital services. Researchers in Tennessee found that the intervention reduced their healthcare encounters by 39%. Patients lack information about imaging exams, study finds http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/patients-lack-information-imaging-exams-radiology-study-yale?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/patients-lack-information-imaging-exams-radiology-study-yale?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Sat, 17 Feb 2018 20:14:46 CST Joanne Finnegan at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Doctors can do a better job providing patients with information before they go for an imaging exam, a new study found. One in five patients shows up for an imaging exam without any information about the test they are about to undergo, according to the study published in Radiology. Most for-profit hospitals will benefit from U.S. tax overhaul, but 2 big-name providers stand to gain the most http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/most-for-profit-hospitals-will-benefit-from-us-tax-overhaul-but-two-big-name-providers?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/most-for-profit-hospitals-will-benefit-from-us-tax-overhaul-but-two-big-name-providers?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 16 Feb 2018 15:23:18 CST Ilene MacDonald at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Most for-profit hospitals stand to gain from the changes to the U.S. tax laws, according to a new Moody’s Investors Service report. But HCA Healthcare and Universal Health Service will be the biggest beneficiaries and could see their operating cash flows go up by 10% or more. North Carolina attorney general seeks more details on Atrium Health-UNC Health Care merger  http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/atrium-health-university-north-carolina-merger-ag-wants-details?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/atrium-health-university-north-carolina-merger-ag-wants-details?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 16 Feb 2018 15:12:13 CST Paige Minemyer at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare North Carolina's attorney general is asking Atrium Health and UNC Health Care to provide more information on their merger plans. AG Josh Stein said he intends to ensure that the planned merger doesn't increase patient costs. 5 medical conditions that cost more than $15K per hospital stay http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/5-medical-conditions-cost-more-than-15k-per-hospital-stay?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/5-medical-conditions-cost-more-than-15k-per-hospital-stay?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 16 Feb 2018 14:01:34 CST Ilene MacDonald at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Heart valve disorders lead the list of the most expensive medical conditions with the highest average cost per inpatient stay, according to an analysis by Business Insider based on 2016 data from Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project. Heart valve disorders, on average, cost $41,878 per stay, the analysis found. Anthem alters controversial ER coverage policies http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/anthem-er-coverage-policy-changes?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/anthem-er-coverage-policy-changes?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 16 Feb 2018 11:50:13 CST Leslie Small at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Seeking to address mounting concerns from providers and other stakeholders, Anthem has made changes to policies it previously rolled out that restrict coverage for emergency room visits. The insurer has implemented a series of “always pay” exceptions for certain circumstances, like when the patient received any kind of surgery or an MRI or CT scan. VA head Shulkin to reimburse disputed European travel expenses, but Dems call for hearing over controversy http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/healthcare/va-head-s-european-trip-drama-continues-shulkin-will-reimburse-disputed-expenses-but-won?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/healthcare/va-head-s-european-trip-drama-continues-shulkin-will-reimburse-disputed-expenses-but-won?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 16 Feb 2018 10:30:06 CST Ilene MacDonald at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Veterans Affairs Secretary David Shulkin, M.D., says he will reimburse travel expenses that were the subject of an internal investigation into a trip he took to Europe this summer, but that may not put an end to the controversy. One lawmaker has called for Shulkin’s resignation, and four Democrats have requested a hearing about the trip.