MedClimate Health News Daily http://medclimate.com/feed en-us Copyright MedClimate, Inc2019 Technology’s impact on healthcare experiences – Join Philips live as it announces the latest Future Health Index findings http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/resource/europe/technology-s-impact-healthcare-experiences-join-philips-live-it-announces-latest http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/resource/europe/technology-s-impact-healthcare-experiences-join-philips-live-it-announces-latest Wed, 29 May 2019 09:30:11 CDT jfinison at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy Sponsor: PhilipsPrimary topic: Government & PolicyTopic: ClinicalConnected HealthGovernment & PolicyNetwork InfrastructureResource Central: Upcoming WebinarsExternal url: https://himss.webex.com/himss/onstage/g.php?MTID=e2e4f89b5ebd48a19dc8873a9c4236b00Thumbnail: Body: Disable Auto Tagging: Short Headline: Technology’s impact on healthcare experiences – Join Philips live as it announces the latest Future Health Index findingsRegion Tag: Europe/UK
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Mobile phone app designed to boost physical activity in women shows promise http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/mobile-phone-app-designed-boost-physical-activity-women-shows-promise http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/mobile-phone-app-designed-boost-physical-activity-women-shows-promise Fri, 24 May 2019 15:00:00 CDT NIH News Release Novel evidence-based approach led to short- and long-term fitness benefits. ]]> AMIA to ONC on interoperability rules: 'Share now, standardize as needed' http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/amia-onc-interoperability-rules-share-now-standardize-needed http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/amia-onc-interoperability-rules-share-now-standardize-needed Fri, 24 May 2019 13:37:31 CDT mmiliard at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy The American Medical Informatics Association is generally pleased with the proposed interoperability rules put forth by the National Coordinator for Health IT. But the informatics group is warning against overly prescriptive interpretation of the 21st Century Cures Act's aims for data exchange. WHY IT MATTERS In comments submitted to ONC this week, AMIA said it's wary that ONC might "solidify a dynamic where health data must be standardized before it is available for patient care or research." Instead, called on the agency to "flip the paradigm" that currently calls for rigidly standardized data for interoperability. ONC's rules should ensure that health data – which will only grow more diverse and come from more sources in the years ahead – can be exchanged first and normalized later, said AMIA. This will vastly improve the size and scope of datasets, and the speed with which they can move among systems – a boon for innovation, care coordination and quality improvement. "These proposals represent the most consequential health informatics policies since the first meaningful use regulation was proposed a decade ago," said AMIA President and CEO Douglas Fridsma, MD, in a statement. "The new policies outlined by ONC will fundamentally and dramatically change the landscape for health IT and data availability. But we must go further to put patients, providers, and researchers in the driver’s seat." By embracing a "share now, standardize as needed" policy, the ONC rules would be able to help break the existing cycle of dependency where "patients, clinicians, and researchers are at the mercy of health IT developers to access their data routinely," said AMIA in its comments. Among the many other recommendations AMIA made in its comments to ONC, it also offered its take on some pressing privacy and security concerns. It said the agency's final rules should: Disambiguate API users into two distinct stakeholder groups: 3rd Party API users who develop software and interact with API technology suppliers and 1st order API users who are end users of the software developed by 3rd party API users; Ensure, as a provision of API condition and maintenance of certification, that those technology suppliers require 3rd party API users to attest to having in place a Privacy Notice, modeled from ONC’s work, for each app developed as part of the registration process; and Define “patient authorized representative” narrowly as “a person within the continuum of medical care or with a medical power of attorney or legal guardianship” for purposes of EHI Export for Patient Access. Take "immediate, explicit, and public steps to implement recommendations of the 2016 API Task Force to foster secondary markets for application endorsements, where stakeholders (e.g. health IT developers, patients, consumer advocacy groups, clinical specialty societies and provider organizations) can endorse apps for meeting specified expectations of performance." AMIA also put forth some process recommendations to help ONC ensure the success of its policy goals. It ask ONC to issue an interim final rule (or similar regulatory mechanism) to enable more feedback to be gathered from stakeholders on outstanding questions once the rule has been finalized. The group expressed concerns with ONC defining both development and deployment requirements for new certification criteria and functionality. "While we understand the need for, and agree with, policies that compel adoption of new standards and functionality, we recommend that ONC remain focused on certification and technology requirements, not provider adoption policies," officials said. THE LARGER TREND The new comments from AMIA are consistent to what Fridsma – a former ONC official himself – had told Healthcare IT News in April. He said then that he was concerned the proposed rules might have the value proposition of interoperable data upside down. "We should share everything, and then standardize it over time," said Fridsma. "So what ends up happening is, if you've got the entire designated medical record set, there are some very basic standards that give you a little bit of metadata. They'll say: This document is about Mrs. Jones from Dr. Smith at General Hospital; medical record number, date, and it's a pathology report. "So rather than trying to standardize disease progression or disease classification, or the ontology of possible malignant diagnoses, or structuring the way in which all the elements that might be captured in a pathology report are there, we should get that pathology report out and have just a minimum amount of information, and then all of the rest of it pretext," he explained. "And computable. Not necessarily standardized, but computable." What then happens over time, said Fridsma, a natural progression of standardization, rather than one imposed from the top that might stifle innovation. "All the pathologists get together and say, 'You know, I'm getting all these pathology reports, and they're all different. What if we just got together? Because it would make my life a whole lot easier if we all did it in a similar way,'" said Fridsma. By sharing first, you "recognize the value and then have sort of a value-based standardization process that you can prioritize, based on what people think are going be important to standardize because they've looked at the data, they've seen what's in it and they can figure out ways to do it," he said. ON THE RECORD "We are entering an exciting new era where patient data will more easily be available for clinical care, research, and patient empowerment,” said AMIA Board Chair Peter J. Embi, MD, president and CEO if Regenstrief Institute. "Of course, with this progress comes new challenges. AMIA and the informatics community stand ready to offer our members’ expertise to continue to both empower and protect patients." Twitter: @MikeMiliardHITN Email the writer: mike.miliard@himssmedia.com Healthcare IT News is a HIMSS Media publication.  Special Report: 

The American Medical Informatics Association is generally pleased with the proposed interoperability rules put forth by the National Coordinator for Health IT. But the informatics group is warning against overly prescriptive interpretation of the 21st Century Cures Act's aims for data exchange.

WHY IT MATTERS
In comments submitted to ONC this week, AMIA said it's wary that ONC might "solidify a dynamic where health data must be standardized before it is available for patient care or research."

Instead, called on the agency to "flip the paradigm" that currently calls for rigidly standardized data for interoperability. ONC's rules should ensure that health data – which will only grow more diverse and come from more sources in the years ahead – can be exchanged first and normalized later, said AMIA.

This will vastly improve the size and scope of datasets, and the speed with which they can move among systems – a boon for innovation, care coordination and quality improvement.

"These proposals represent the most consequential health informatics policies since the first meaningful use regulation was proposed a decade ago," said AMIA President and CEO Douglas Fridsma, MD, in a statement. "The new policies outlined by ONC will fundamentally and dramatically change the landscape for health IT and data availability. But we must go further to put patients, providers, and researchers in the driver’s seat."

By embracing a "share now, standardize as needed" policy, the ONC rules would be able to help break the existing cycle of dependency where "patients, clinicians, and researchers are at the mercy of health IT developers to access their data routinely," said AMIA in its comments.

Among the many other recommendations AMIA made in its comments to ONC, it also offered its take on some pressing privacy and security concerns. It said the agency's final rules should:

  • Disambiguate API users into two distinct stakeholder groups: 3rd Party API users who develop software and interact with API technology suppliers and 1st order API users who are end users of the software developed by 3rd party API users;
  • Ensure, as a provision of API condition and maintenance of certification, that those technology suppliers require 3rd party API users to attest to having in place a Privacy Notice, modeled from ONC’s work, for each app developed as part of the registration process; and
  • Define “patient authorized representative” narrowly as “a person within the continuum of medical care or with a medical power of attorney or legal guardianship” for purposes of EHI Export for Patient Access.
  • Take "immediate, explicit, and public steps to implement recommendations of the 2016 API Task Force to foster secondary markets for application endorsements, where stakeholders (e.g. health IT developers, patients, consumer advocacy groups, clinical specialty societies and provider organizations) can endorse apps for meeting specified expectations of performance."

AMIA also put forth some process recommendations to help ONC ensure the success of its policy goals. It ask ONC to issue an interim final rule (or similar regulatory mechanism) to enable more feedback to be gathered from stakeholders on outstanding questions once the rule has been finalized.

The group expressed concerns with ONC defining both development and deployment requirements for new certification criteria and functionality.

"While we understand the need for, and agree with, policies that compel adoption of new standards and functionality, we recommend that ONC remain focused on certification and technology requirements, not provider adoption policies," officials said.

THE LARGER TREND
The new comments from AMIA are consistent to what Fridsma – a former ONC official himself – had told Healthcare IT News in April. He said then that he was concerned the proposed rules might have the value proposition of interoperable data upside down.

"We should share everything, and then standardize it over time," said Fridsma. "So what ends up happening is, if you've got the entire designated medical record set, there are some very basic standards that give you a little bit of metadata. They'll say: This document is about Mrs. Jones from Dr. Smith at General Hospital; medical record number, date, and it's a pathology report.

"So rather than trying to standardize disease progression or disease classification, or the ontology of possible malignant diagnoses, or structuring the way in which all the elements that might be captured in a pathology report are there, we should get that pathology report out and have just a minimum amount of information, and then all of the rest of it pretext," he explained. "And computable. Not necessarily standardized, but computable."

What then happens over time, said Fridsma, a natural progression of standardization, rather than one imposed from the top that might stifle innovation.

"All the pathologists get together and say, 'You know, I'm getting all these pathology reports, and they're all different. What if we just got together? Because it would make my life a whole lot easier if we all did it in a similar way,'" said Fridsma.

By sharing first, you "recognize the value and then have sort of a value-based standardization process that you can prioritize, based on what people think are going be important to standardize because they've looked at the data, they've seen what's in it and they can figure out ways to do it," he said.

ON THE RECORD
"We are entering an exciting new era where patient data will more easily be available for clinical care, research, and patient empowerment,” said AMIA Board Chair Peter J. Embi, MD, president and CEO if Regenstrief Institute. "Of course, with this progress comes new challenges. AMIA and the informatics community stand ready to offer our members’ expertise to continue to both empower and protect patients."

Twitter: @MikeMiliardHITN
Email the writer: mike.miliard@himssmedia.com

Healthcare IT News is a HIMSS Media publication. 

Special Report: 
]]>
CMU, Pitt to outfit DoD with robotic trauma care tech http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/north-america/cmu-pitt-outfit-dod-robotic-trauma-care-tech http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/north-america/cmu-pitt-outfit-dod-robotic-trauma-care-tech Fri, 24 May 2019 09:08:41 CDT tsullivan at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine have each have been awarded four-year contracts from the U.S. Department of Defense to create an autonomous trauma care system. WHY IT MATTERS The autonomous or nearly autonomous system, “TRAuma Care In a Rucksack” (TRACIR), is essentially a backpack containing an inflatable vest or perhaps a collapsed stretcher that can treat and stabilize soldiers injured in remote locations. It would then open up, inflate, position itself and begin stabilizing the patient, and whatever human assistance it might need could be provided by someone without medical training. Monitors embedded in the suit will assess injury, while artificial intelligence algorithms will guide the appropriate critical care interventions and robotically apply stabilizing treatments, such as intravenous fluids and medications. The overall goal of TRACIR is to treat and stabilize soldiers in the battlefield, even during periods of prolonged field care, when evacuation is not possible. By fusing data captured from multiple sensors and applying machine learning, Pitt is developing more predictive cardio-pulmonary resuscitation opportunities, which are designed to help conserve an injured soldier's strength. ON THE RECORD “Much technology still needs to be developed to enable robots to reliably and safely perform tasks, such as inserting IV needles or placing a chest tube in the field, Ron Poropatich, director of Pitt's Center for Military Medicine Research and professor in Pitt's division of pulmonary, allergy and critical care medicine, said in a statement. He explained that initially, the research would be "a series of baby steps," demonstrating the practicality of individual components the system will eventually require. These steps will lead towards the project’s larger goal, which is to develop more advanced AI technologies that enable medical interventions to extend the "golden hour" for treating combat casualties, thsu ensuring an injured person's survival for long medical evacuations. There are also numerous potential civilian applications beyond its use in the military, according to Poropatich, including deployments by drone to hikers or mountain climbers injured in the wilderness. “It could be used by people in submarines or boats, it could give trauma care capabilities to rural health clinics or be used by aid workers responding to natural disasters," Poropatich continued. "And, someday, it could even be used by astronauts on Mars." Poropatich is the principal investigator on the $3.7 million Pitt contract, while Artur Dubrawski, research professor at CMU's Robotics Institute, is the principal investigator on the $3.5 million Carnegie Mellon contract. Nathan Eddy is a healthcare and technology freelancer based in Berlin. Email the writer: nathaneddy@gmail.com Twitter: @dropdeaded209  Healthcare IT News is a HIMSS Media publication.  Special Report: 

Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine have each have been awarded four-year contracts from the U.S. Department of Defense to create an autonomous trauma care system.

WHY IT MATTERS

The autonomous or nearly autonomous system, “TRAuma Care In a Rucksack” (TRACIR), is essentially a backpack containing an inflatable vest or perhaps a collapsed stretcher that can treat and stabilize soldiers injured in remote locations.

It would then open up, inflate, position itself and begin stabilizing the patient, and whatever human assistance it might need could be provided by someone without medical training.

Monitors embedded in the suit will assess injury, while artificial intelligence algorithms will guide the appropriate critical care interventions and robotically apply stabilizing treatments, such as intravenous fluids and medications.

The overall goal of TRACIR is to treat and stabilize soldiers in the battlefield, even during periods of prolonged field care, when evacuation is not possible.

By fusing data captured from multiple sensors and applying machine learning, Pitt is developing more predictive cardio-pulmonary resuscitation opportunities, which are designed to help conserve an injured soldier's strength.

ON THE RECORD

“Much technology still needs to be developed to enable robots to reliably and safely perform tasks, such as inserting IV needles or placing a chest tube in the field, Ron Poropatich, director of Pitt's Center for Military Medicine Research and professor in Pitt's division of pulmonary, allergy and critical care medicine, said in a statement.

He explained that initially, the research would be "a series of baby steps," demonstrating the practicality of individual components the system will eventually require.

These steps will lead towards the project’s larger goal, which is to develop more advanced AI technologies that enable medical interventions to extend the "golden hour" for treating combat casualties, thsu ensuring an injured person's survival for long medical evacuations.

There are also numerous potential civilian applications beyond its use in the military, according to Poropatich, including deployments by drone to hikers or mountain climbers injured in the wilderness.

“It could be used by people in submarines or boats, it could give trauma care capabilities to rural health clinics or be used by aid workers responding to natural disasters," Poropatich continued. "And, someday, it could even be used by astronauts on Mars."

Poropatich is the principal investigator on the $3.7 million Pitt contract, while Artur Dubrawski, research professor at CMU's Robotics Institute, is the principal investigator on the $3.5 million Carnegie Mellon contract.

Nathan Eddy is a healthcare and technology freelancer based in Berlin.

Email the writer: nathaneddy@gmail.com

Twitter: @dropdeaded209 

Healthcare IT News is a HIMSS Media publication. 

Special Report: 
]]>
Study shows incidence rates of aggressive subtypes of uterine cancer rising http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/study-shows-incidence-rates-aggressive-subtypes-uterine-cancer-rising http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/study-shows-incidence-rates-aggressive-subtypes-uterine-cancer-rising Wed, 22 May 2019 20:00:00 CDT NIH News Release Findings also reveal racial disparities, including higher incidence of these aggressive subtypes and poorer survival among non-Hispanic black women. ]]> NIH announces two awards for multi-year studies of influenza immunity in children http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-announces-two-awards-multi-year-studies-influenza-immunity-children http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-announces-two-awards-multi-year-studies-influenza-immunity-children Wed, 22 May 2019 18:00:00 CDT NIH News Release Grants may total more than $64 million over seven years. ]]> Connecting the vision, data, technology and people to drive change in UK health and care http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/europe/connecting-vision-data-technology-and-people-drive-change-uk-health-and-care http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/europe/connecting-vision-data-technology-and-people-drive-change-uk-health-and-care Wed, 22 May 2019 11:01:54 CDT lpostelnicu at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy According to the NHS long term plan published in January this year, providers across acute, community and mental health settings in England will be expected to reach “a core level of digitisation” by 2024, covering all clinical and operational processes, with “robust, modern IT infrastructure services for hosting, storage, networks and cyber security”. Although the new digitisation timeline has been described as “probably unachievable” at the first educational summit in the newly-launched HIMSS DM Series, Actionable Insights to Digital Maturity, last week, we are said to be at a turning point in the digital transformation of health and social care in the UK. There is no denying that change has been slow, but we now have affordable technology that can deliver and a desire within the system to deploy and use it more effectively, attendees at the summit emphasised. “I wouldn’t want to be the last CIO [Chief Information Officer] using paper in 2024,” one commented. The DM summit, which took place in Greater Manchester last week after a tour of the Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust, draws on research carried out by HIMSS, owner of Healthcare IT News, to understand the standards, insights and communities needed to enable and accelerate digital transformation in this space. It is based on its suite of digital maturity models, which includes the internationally-recognised Electronic Medical Record Adoption Model (EMRAM) and the Continuity of Care Maturity Model (CCMM). WORK TOGETHER TO MAKE PROGRESS FASTER Digital is only an enabler and not an end in its own right, attendees heard, and the challenge ahead and the harsh reality of a fragmented system, budgets that are becoming more and more stretched – the “financial envelope” is not growing despite the extra £20bn a year by 2023 – should not be underestimated. That said, however, money is always available – it’s just not being spent on the right thing, one attendee cautioned. Furthermore, the real barrier will be with organisations that have not invested for a long period of time in their infrastructure, systems and digital leadership. “Investing in basic infrastructure is key and must be done as a preparatory process before the deployment of any EPR capability. How do you expect to digitise when you do not even have proper WiFi?” the delegate added. NHS organisations were encouraged to collaborate and work with others that have “already been on the journey” to demonstrate that they can make progress faster. “We are beginning to see organisations across the NHS that can stand tall and say, we are as good as the rest of the world,” one delegate said. “What we want to do is actually learn the lessons and share the lessons of how to do it.” But one attendee explained that his trust had gone to procurement twice for an EPR system and was pushed back because of the Local Health and Care Record Exemplar (LHCRE) investment: “The investment that was promised was then reduced centrally and that’s a real challenge. I think we’ve got the right people, I think we’ve got the right culture in place, but we do need better buy-in from suppliers and transparency about pricing." NHSX - THE KEY TO SOLVING THE COMPLEXITY AND CONFUSION AROUND THE NHS DIGITAL AGENDA? Since being appointed to the role in July last year, health and social care secretary Matt Hancock has made sorting out the basic IT infrastructure across health and social care one of his key priorities. Most recently, he announced the launch of NHSX, a new unit for digital, data and technology. Mathew Gould, who was until recently the government’s director of digital and media policy, has been named as the new venture's chief executive, and he will be accountable to the health secretary and chief executives of NHS England and NHS Improvement. The new unit will bring some cohesion into a space seen as fragmented, with responsibility for digital split across various agencies and organisations, according to the Department for Health and Social Care. NHSX will develop and mandate standards for the use of technology in the NHS, and all investment will have to demonstrate that it is delivering against the tech vision and the national standards.  And while NHSX won’t be the answer to every question, it's a “step forward”, according to speakers. But we need person-led transformation, technology that is usable, change processes that can make it fit for purpose, and clinicians confident to educate boards about the importance of digital. “I think the challenge as a technologist is that it’s easy to point to the technology and it’s easy to say, here’s something we put in, it’s much harder for us to calculate and measure the impact and benefits," one attendee said. "I think the challenge for everyone in this room, and whether that’s an organisation that’s at HIMSS (EMRAM) Stage 4 or HIMSS 7, is to demonstrate the value within the institution and increasingly as we look at LHCREs, ICSs, STP models, looking at demonstrating the impact of technology across those communities as well." HOW DOES THE EMRAM APPLY TO THE UK, AND WHAT DOES SUCCESS LOOK LIKE? The HIMSS EMRAM is an eight-stage model that measures EPR capabilities and their impact on systems and patients, tracking the progress of organisations against others in Europe and the world. More than 2,500 hospitals in Europe have been assessed on the EMRAM, and the standards were updated at the beginning of January 2018, with the input of international groups of CIOs, CCIOs, industry partners and HIMSS Analytics. In the UK, Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and Kingston Hospital NHS Foundation Trust have been validated at Stage 6 of the EMRAM. Other organisations are currently going through the process, however, at the summit, delegates heard that the average EMRAM score for secondary care providers in England is 2.5 at the moment. It is believed that the expectation from the centre is that all will be at Stage 6 of the EMRAM by 2024. Meanwhile, in Europe, there are only five hospitals validated at Stage 7 of the model, including Portugal’s Hospital de Cascais. The aim is not to reach the highest level of the maturity model, but to improve capabilities and maximise technology investments and the resources available, delegates heard. However, a recent HIMSS Analytics and KLAS survey indicated that physicians that have access to the full tech suite that comes with the EMRAM Stage 7 are generally more satisfied overall, having “better tools to deliver care”, as well as “better functionality” and “better integration”. To make this work, you need at least three things: an alignment with the hospital’s strategy, clinical engagement, investment, and a continuous focus on process improvement. At Cascais, the board has empowered clinicians to lead change projects, and their “voices are heard all the time”. In England, delegates heard that “having the board behind you” can go a long way. “Unless you have that, you won’t succeed,” one commented. You can’t just plug technology into things that you are currently doing, you have to change existing processes, other attendees added, and recognise that “people, process and culture are more important in determining outcomes than your choice of tools and technology”. “Digital transformation for me is about recruiting talent, it’s all about partnerships, partnerships with tech, partnerships with life sciences, that’s with pharma, that’s with medical technology. It’s all about driving academia and actually utilising academia which is great in the digital space, but also pivoting non-digital academia more towards that stuff is really important too. “It’s all about patient and clinical engagement, so how do you take those people to see things in a different way, particularly in the clinical communities, and that’s a big challenge, it’s also about how you set up new commercial models that are fit for the digital age,” one mentioned. GOING BEYOND BRICK AND MORTAR But we also talk extensively about digital maturity across the NHS as being a journey rather than a destination, one delegate said. Yet we know that noncommunicable diseases are a leading cause of disability and death worldwide, and we know that unhealthy behaviours and unhealthy lifestyle choices put a significant pressure on the health system. Even in Manchester, two thirds of premature deaths are related to behaviours that can be changed, it was explained at the summit. We also know that healthcare is predominantly based on the interactions that people have with the health system, but the system has "almost no data" on what people do when they’re not in a healthcare setting, which presents a real challenge, one delegate added. Therefore, there is a need to shift the balance from basing all activities of the system on the limited interactions with patients to starting to consider all the data generated outside of it in order to “design and deliver proactive and personalised services in a way that supports earlier targeted interventions that helps people before they even know they need it”. And as demand on the system will continue to grow, it is important to remember that digital transformation is not simply about digitising existing services, but about changing and innovating, attendees concluded. The HIMSS DM summit took place in Salford last week under the Chatham House Rule, which allows information from the event to be disclosed without attributing it to any of those present. Healthcare IT News is a HIMSS Media publication. Special Report: 

According to the NHS long term plan published in January this year, providers across acute, community and mental health settings in England will be expected to reach “a core level of digitisation” by 2024, covering all clinical and operational processes, with “robust, modern IT infrastructure services for hosting, storage, networks and cyber security”.

Although the new digitisation timeline has been described as “probably unachievable” at the first educational summit in the newly-launched HIMSS DM Series, Actionable Insights to Digital Maturity, last week, we are said to be at a turning point in the digital transformation of health and social care in the UK.

There is no denying that change has been slow, but we now have affordable technology that can deliver and a desire within the system to deploy and use it more effectively, attendees at the summit emphasised. “I wouldn’t want to be the last CIO [Chief Information Officer] using paper in 2024,” one commented.

The DM summit, which took place in Greater Manchester last week after a tour of the Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust, draws on research carried out by HIMSS, owner of Healthcare IT News, to understand the standards, insights and communities needed to enable and accelerate digital transformation in this space.

It is based on its suite of digital maturity models, which includes the internationally-recognised Electronic Medical Record Adoption Model (EMRAM) and the Continuity of Care Maturity Model (CCMM).

WORK TOGETHER TO MAKE PROGRESS FASTER

Digital is only an enabler and not an end in its own right, attendees heard, and the challenge ahead and the harsh reality of a fragmented system, budgets that are becoming more and more stretched – the “financial envelope” is not growing despite the extra £20bn a year by 2023 – should not be underestimated.

That said, however, money is always available – it’s just not being spent on the right thing, one attendee cautioned. Furthermore, the real barrier will be with organisations that have not invested for a long period of time in their infrastructure, systems and digital leadership. “Investing in basic infrastructure is key and must be done as a preparatory process before the deployment of any EPR capability. How do you expect to digitise when you do not even have proper WiFi?” the delegate added.

NHS organisations were encouraged to collaborate and work with others that have “already been on the journey” to demonstrate that they can make progress faster. “We are beginning to see organisations across the NHS that can stand tall and say, we are as good as the rest of the world,” one delegate said. “What we want to do is actually learn the lessons and share the lessons of how to do it.”

But one attendee explained that his trust had gone to procurement twice for an EPR system and was pushed back because of the Local Health and Care Record Exemplar (LHCRE) investment: “The investment that was promised was then reduced centrally and that’s a real challenge. I think we’ve got the right people, I think we’ve got the right culture in place, but we do need better buy-in from suppliers and transparency about pricing."

NHSX - THE KEY TO SOLVING THE COMPLEXITY AND CONFUSION AROUND THE NHS DIGITAL AGENDA?

Since being appointed to the role in July last year, health and social care secretary Matt Hancock has made sorting out the basic IT infrastructure across health and social care one of his key priorities. Most recently, he announced the launch of NHSX, a new unit for digital, data and technology.

Mathew Gould, who was until recently the government’s director of digital and media policy, has been named as the new venture's chief executive, and he will be accountable to the health secretary and chief executives of NHS England and NHS Improvement.

The new unit will bring some cohesion into a space seen as fragmented, with responsibility for digital split across various agencies and organisations, according to the Department for Health and Social Care. NHSX will develop and mandate standards for the use of technology in the NHS, and all investment will have to demonstrate that it is delivering against the tech vision and the national standards. 

And while NHSX won’t be the answer to every question, it's a “step forward”, according to speakers. But we need person-led transformation, technology that is usable, change processes that can make it fit for purpose, and clinicians confident to educate boards about the importance of digital.

“I think the challenge as a technologist is that it’s easy to point to the technology and it’s easy to say, here’s something we put in, it’s much harder for us to calculate and measure the impact and benefits," one attendee said. "I think the challenge for everyone in this room, and whether that’s an organisation that’s at HIMSS (EMRAM) Stage 4 or HIMSS 7, is to demonstrate the value within the institution and increasingly as we look at LHCREs, ICSs, STP models, looking at demonstrating the impact of technology across those communities as well."

HOW DOES THE EMRAM APPLY TO THE UK, AND WHAT DOES SUCCESS LOOK LIKE?

The HIMSS EMRAM is an eight-stage model that measures EPR capabilities and their impact on systems and patients, tracking the progress of organisations against others in Europe and the world. More than 2,500 hospitals in Europe have been assessed on the EMRAM, and the standards were updated at the beginning of January 2018, with the input of international groups of CIOs, CCIOs, industry partners and HIMSS Analytics.

In the UK, Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and Kingston Hospital NHS Foundation Trust have been validated at Stage 6 of the EMRAM. Other organisations are currently going through the process, however, at the summit, delegates heard that the average EMRAM score for secondary care providers in England is 2.5 at the moment. It is believed that the expectation from the centre is that all will be at Stage 6 of the EMRAM by 2024.

Meanwhile, in Europe, there are only five hospitals validated at Stage 7 of the model, including Portugal’s Hospital de Cascais. The aim is not to reach the highest level of the maturity model, but to improve capabilities and maximise technology investments and the resources available, delegates heard. However, a recent HIMSS Analytics and KLAS survey indicated that physicians that have access to the full tech suite that comes with the EMRAM Stage 7 are generally more satisfied overall, having “better tools to deliver care”, as well as “better functionality” and “better integration”.

To make this work, you need at least three things: an alignment with the hospital’s strategy, clinical engagement, investment, and a continuous focus on process improvement. At Cascais, the board has empowered clinicians to lead change projects, and their “voices are heard all the time”. In England, delegates heard that “having the board behind you” can go a long way. “Unless you have that, you won’t succeed,” one commented.

You can’t just plug technology into things that you are currently doing, you have to change existing processes, other attendees added, and recognise that “people, process and culture are more important in determining outcomes than your choice of tools and technology”.

“Digital transformation for me is about recruiting talent, it’s all about partnerships, partnerships with tech, partnerships with life sciences, that’s with pharma, that’s with medical technology. It’s all about driving academia and actually utilising academia which is great in the digital space, but also pivoting non-digital academia more towards that stuff is really important too.

“It’s all about patient and clinical engagement, so how do you take those people to see things in a different way, particularly in the clinical communities, and that’s a big challenge, it’s also about how you set up new commercial models that are fit for the digital age,” one mentioned.

GOING BEYOND BRICK AND MORTAR

But we also talk extensively about digital maturity across the NHS as being a journey rather than a destination, one delegate said. Yet we know that noncommunicable diseases are a leading cause of disability and death worldwide, and we know that unhealthy behaviours and unhealthy lifestyle choices put a significant pressure on the health system. Even in Manchester, two thirds of premature deaths are related to behaviours that can be changed, it was explained at the summit.

We also know that healthcare is predominantly based on the interactions that people have with the health system, but the system has "almost no data" on what people do when they’re not in a healthcare setting, which presents a real challenge, one delegate added. Therefore, there is a need to shift the balance from basing all activities of the system on the limited interactions with patients to starting to consider all the data generated outside of it in order to “design and deliver proactive and personalised services in a way that supports earlier targeted interventions that helps people before they even know they need it”.

And as demand on the system will continue to grow, it is important to remember that digital transformation is not simply about digitising existing services, but about changing and innovating, attendees concluded.

The HIMSS DM summit took place in Salford last week under the Chatham House Rule, which allows information from the event to be disclosed without attributing it to any of those present. Healthcare IT News is a HIMSS Media publication.

Special Report: 
]]>
Future of flagship NHS global digital exemplar programme unclear, according to recent reports http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/europe/future-flagship-nhs-global-digital-exemplar-programme-unclear-according-recent-reports http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/europe/future-flagship-nhs-global-digital-exemplar-programme-unclear-according-recent-reports Wed, 22 May 2019 06:07:47 CDT lpostelnicu at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy Concerns have been raised about the future of the NHS global digital exemplar programme in England, according to a recent report in the Health Service Journal (HSJ). Through the scheme, a suite of acute, mental health and ambulance trusts have received funding - which has to be matched locally - to accelerate digital transformation and work with other providers selected as "fast followers" to demonstrate that they can make progress faster.  But with not enough funding for digital programmes through to 2021, NHS sources told the publication that the GDE scheme was thought to be “most at risk” of being discontinued, although health and social care secretary Matt Hancock said in September last year at the NHS Expo conference that £200m would be allocated to create a new set of GDEs. The NHS long term plan published in January also pointed to additional GDEs, and NHS England told the HSJ that the NHS remained “committed” to the programme, and that the new unit for data, digital and technology, NHSX, would be “working with regional leads to ensure the next wave of the GDE programme targets local needs in each part of the country”. The creation of NHSX was announced earlier this year, and Matthew Gould, until recently the government’s director of digital and media policy, has been appointed as chief executive. NHSX will become operational later this year, and Gould will have strategic responsibility for setting the national policy on technology across health and social care. He will be accountable to the health secretary and the chief executives of NHS England and NHS Improvement. GDE programme helps Cambridge University Hospitals "enable better sharing of knowledge" The GDE scheme was created after the publication of the Wachter review in 2016, Making IT Work, which suggested a “phased approach” to digitising secondary care providers, with the £4.2bn made available by the Treasury that year seen as “not enough to enable digital implementation and optimisation at all NHS trusts”. “During Phase 1 (2016-2019), national funding should be combined with local resources to support implementation in trusts that are prepared to digitise, and to support those that are already digitised and ready to reach even higher levels of digital maturity. Another tranche of government funding (not yet allocated) will likely be needed to support a second stage (Phase 2, 2020-2023) of the strategy,” according to the document. Professor Bob Wachter, chair of the Department of Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, who led the review, wrote on Twitter this week that he hoped the reports “prove not to be true”.  Meanwhile, a team of experts from the University of Edinburgh, University College London and the NHS Arden & GEM Commissioning Support Unit, are carrying out an evaluation of the programme.  Commenting on the reports, Dr Afzal Chaudhry, chief clinical information officer at Cambridge University Hospitals (CUH), which is part of the GDE scheme and a HIMSS EMRAM Stage 6 site, told Healthcare IT News: “Combined with our own Trust investment and digital transformation plans, we have found the Global Digital Exemplar (GDE) programme to be very helpful in supporting Cambridge University Hospitals (CUH) to achieve world-class patient care through the use of digital technology, and enable better sharing of knowledge to support other NHS trusts in achieving the same. “The GDE programme has supported CUH in developing key initiatives, including a UK first in real-time digital patient record sharing with West Suffolk Hospital (another GDE trust using a different electronic patient record supplier) for hundreds of our shared patients each month, and sharing of our Trust-wide barcode medication administration implementation processes with other hospitals to assist with their adoption of digital technology to improve patient safety.” Healthcare IT News has approached the Department of Health and Social Care for comment. Special Report: 

Concerns have been raised about the future of the NHS global digital exemplar programme in England, according to a recent report in the Health Service Journal (HSJ).

Through the scheme, a suite of acute, mental health and ambulance trusts have received funding - which has to be matched locally - to accelerate digital transformation and work with other providers selected as "fast followers" to demonstrate that they can make progress faster. 

But with not enough funding for digital programmes through to 2021, NHS sources told the publication that the GDE scheme was thought to be “most at risk” of being discontinued, although health and social care secretary Matt Hancock said in September last year at the NHS Expo conference that £200m would be allocated to create a new set of GDEs.

The NHS long term plan published in January also pointed to additional GDEs, and NHS England told the HSJ that the NHS remained “committed” to the programme, and that the new unit for data, digital and technology, NHSX, would be “working with regional leads to ensure the next wave of the GDE programme targets local needs in each part of the country”.

The creation of NHSX was announced earlier this year, and Matthew Gould, until recently the government’s director of digital and media policy, has been appointed as chief executive. NHSX will become operational later this year, and Gould will have strategic responsibility for setting the national policy on technology across health and social care. He will be accountable to the health secretary and the chief executives of NHS England and NHS Improvement.

GDE programme helps Cambridge University Hospitals "enable better sharing of knowledge"

The GDE scheme was created after the publication of the Wachter review in 2016, Making IT Work, which suggested a “phased approach” to digitising secondary care providers, with the £4.2bn made available by the Treasury that year seen as “not enough to enable digital implementation and optimisation at all NHS trusts”.

“During Phase 1 (2016-2019), national funding should be combined with local resources to support implementation in trusts that are prepared to digitise, and to support those that are already digitised and ready to reach even higher levels of digital maturity. Another tranche of government funding (not yet allocated) will likely be needed to support a second stage (Phase 2, 2020-2023) of the strategy,” according to the document.

Professor Bob Wachter, chair of the Department of Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, who led the review, wrote on Twitter this week that he hoped the reports “prove not to be true”. 

Meanwhile, a team of experts from the University of Edinburgh, University College London and the NHS Arden & GEM Commissioning Support Unit, are carrying out an evaluation of the programme

Commenting on the reports, Dr Afzal Chaudhry, chief clinical information officer at Cambridge University Hospitals (CUH), which is part of the GDE scheme and a HIMSS EMRAM Stage 6 site, told Healthcare IT News:

“Combined with our own Trust investment and digital transformation plans, we have found the Global Digital Exemplar (GDE) programme to be very helpful in supporting Cambridge University Hospitals (CUH) to achieve world-class patient care through the use of digital technology, and enable better sharing of knowledge to support other NHS trusts in achieving the same.

“The GDE programme has supported CUH in developing key initiatives, including a UK first in real-time digital patient record sharing with West Suffolk Hospital (another GDE trust using a different electronic patient record supplier) for hundreds of our shared patients each month, and sharing of our Trust-wide barcode medication administration implementation processes with other hospitals to assist with their adoption of digital technology to improve patient safety.”

Healthcare IT News has approached the Department of Health and Social Care for comment.

Special Report: 
]]>
Healthcare in 21 years will be driven by 'radically interoperable data' http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/healthcare-21-years-will-be-driven-radically-interoperable-data http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/healthcare-21-years-will-be-driven-radically-interoperable-data Tue, 21 May 2019 15:15:11 CDT mmiliard at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy As we focus this month on the promise and potential of digital transformation across healthcare, it's encouraging enough to take stock of the huge advances that have already been made in the past decade of the post-EHR era. But as we all know, there's a still plenty of room for innovation and improvement as patients and providers look to take advantage of the rich profusion of data that already exists and is growing near-exponentially. A major impediment, of course, is interoperability. But progress is being made, and momentum seems to be picking up speed – particularly as CMS and ONC prepare to finalize some era-defining rules they say will finally compel some of healthcare's most foot-dragging entrenched interest to embrace data exchange and empower consumers. And if those don't quite do the trick, there are plenty of hungry companies champing at the bit to help force some big changes of their own. For the Amazons, Apples, Googles and Salesforces, healthcare is an "untapped market for them; the margins are much better than retail, and there they're making significant moves," said David Biel, U.S. healthcare consulting leader at Deloitte. "No one is happy with the system the way it is today," he said. "And there are a ton of non-traditional players who are highly motivated to get into this business and disrupt it." Those facts – along with the inexorable forward march of technological transformation, clinical innovation and consumer expectations – are pointing to a future that looks very different than today, said Biel. In Deloitte's recent "Future of Health" report, researchers looked far into the future, nearly to mid-century. Health in the year 2040, according to the report, will thrive on the lifeblood of "radically interoperable data," flowing freely open and secure platforms, helping provide insights for better decision-making on the part of consumers and health systems alike – whether enabling better care delivery or offering insights for day-to-day wellness. We reported on the study when it was first published in January, but found its premise worth revisiting as we explore the various ways digital transformation is taking shape today – and how it will continue to play out in the future. The term "radically interoperable data" is exciting, after all – especially from this vantage point, where basic sending and receiving is still a big challenge for many hospitals. But Biel says it will be a reality within the next 20 years or so. "It really means access to and curation of a very large number and wide ranging set of data that includes individual health data, environmental data, social trade, financial data, institutional data," he explained. "The radical part is that it can be accessed in real-time and analyzed for patterns that impact someone's health and wellness. It can bring insights and serve them essentially up to the consumer where they are, real-time and always available." By 2040, as Deloitte sees it, empowered consumers will be able to "essentially cross index and intermingle different types of data that today are probably in vastly different places that are not accessible to each other and not standardized in any way," said Biel. "Imagine a future state where you wake up in the morning and your in-home device basically tells you that it has noticed that the pollen count has risen you know outside, and that the forecast is showing that the pollen count is going to be high for the next few hours and then essentially it's going to burn off by noon," he said. "The interoperable insight engine knows that you're an asthma patient, and also that you have a jog scheduled at 7:30 in the morning, and essentially recommends to you that you don't  go out and take that jog – that you wait until after the pollen count has dropped, has rescheduled your afternoon meetings for the morning when you were going to take your jog, so now there's open period on your calendar where you can do that. "And, by the way," he added, "it's noticed that you're almost out of connected inhalers so automatically reorder them for you, and a drone dropped them at your doorstep overnight." 7-year cycles of innovation Biel concedes that right now, despite all the hard work from very smart and forward thinking stakeholders on the vendor, policymaker and provider sides, healthcare is still "far, far, far, from radically operable – "we're probably barely even sitting upright so we can start crawling." That said, "we're at the front end of a 20 to 30 year industry transformation," he said. "The industry forces and the disruption that's upon us are true indicators that we're going to be going through a cycle of innovation – and multiple waves of innovation." Indeed, Deloitte's choice of the year 2040 isn't arbitrary. It's 21 years from now for a reason. "We've determined that innovation happens in seven-year waves, essentially, and that big industry transformation typically takes around three innovation cycles," Biel explained. "Right now, we're sort of at the front end of the first wave." From a technology point of view, there's a "surplus of innovative digital point solutions, but all not really connected and all very difficult to implement," he said. "There's also an unprecedented pace of clinical innovation. Think about the fact that 10 or 15 years ago it took over a billion dollars to do the first DNA sequencing and thousands and thousands of man hours. And now, you can you can essentially do it over the Internet for $150 – and it'll be probably under a hundred dollars soon." But if technology and medicine are both making big strides, there are still some major current impediments to the future we all want. For one thing, consumers are "disenfranchised and unsatisfied in a very significant way," said Biel. For another, "we have an unsustainable economic outlook. We're looking at healthcare spending coming up over 20 percent of GDP in the next few years. Longevity is increasing. Medicare will run out of money when people start living to 150 years old." Those factors and others – driven largely by the "non-entrenched outside players who are coming into the market," unencumbered by healthcare's traditional incentive structures – are going to help "accelerate the kind of interoperability that we think is going to ultimately take hold and drive a whole new health ecosystem and help the economy," he said. But more traditional entities – the federal government, say – have an important place at the table too, said Biel – who's encouraged by CMS' and ONC's proposed interoperability rules. "We've finally gotten to a place where the government is really trying to push things along more aggressively," he said. "Seema Verma and some of the others that are sitting up on Capitol Hill are incredibly enlightened, and are trying to move the government in the right direction. So I think those things are very helpful and sends a clear signal to all the players that we have to consider and think about these things more seriously. And those rules – aimed at established health systems and longtime health IT vendors – are meant to send the message to them that the old ways are over, and it's time to adopt more of a "2040" mindset. "I think there is deep interest by all players," said Biel. "I think the entrenched players are deeply interested in the technology and the insights that they can derive through data. But I think they are less incentivized to actually try to break the business models that are funding them today. But I do see, within those organizations you see a lot of organizations developing pretty sophisticated data and analytic strategies: Putting in place chief digital officers and chief health information officers; developing interoperability centers of excellence. They're starting to really take a look at what they need to do to share data." But the public and private sectors will need to work in tandem to truly enable this two-decade progress toward radical interoperability, said Biel. "We're starting to see, which is also encouraging, the non-traditional and traditional players spending time together and pairing up and looking at partnerships and ways that they can bring their different skills and capabilities together to create something innovative and new," he said. "So those all give me hope that this is going to happen. And I do think that over time at the end of the day the consumer, ultimately, and the lack of sustainability of the healthcare economy are going to ultimately drive us to this place. You sort of have nowhere else to go but to innovate in a way that breaks the mold."   Digital Transformation in Healthcare In May, we'll talk to experts and professionals on the front lines about what's really happening today with the digital transformation in healthcare and what hospital executives need to be doing right now. Twitter: @MikeMiliardHITN Email the writer: mike.miliard@himssmedia.com Healthcare IT News is a publication of HIMSS Media. Special Report: 

As we focus this month on the promise and potential of digital transformation across healthcare, it's encouraging enough to take stock of the huge advances that have already been made in the past decade of the post-EHR era.

But as we all know, there's a still plenty of room for innovation and improvement as patients and providers look to take advantage of the rich profusion of data that already exists and is growing near-exponentially.

A major impediment, of course, is interoperability. But progress is being made, and momentum seems to be picking up speed – particularly as CMS and ONC prepare to finalize some era-defining rules they say will finally compel some of healthcare's most foot-dragging entrenched interest to embrace data exchange and empower consumers.

And if those don't quite do the trick, there are plenty of hungry companies champing at the bit to help force some big changes of their own.

For the Amazons, Apples, Googles and Salesforces, healthcare is an "untapped market for them; the margins are much better than retail, and there they're making significant moves," said David Biel, U.S. healthcare consulting leader at Deloitte.

"No one is happy with the system the way it is today," he said. "And there are a ton of non-traditional players who are highly motivated to get into this business and disrupt it."

Those facts – along with the inexorable forward march of technological transformation, clinical innovation and consumer expectations – are pointing to a future that looks very different than today, said Biel.

In Deloitte's recent "Future of Health" report, researchers looked far into the future, nearly to mid-century. Health in the year 2040, according to the report, will thrive on the lifeblood of "radically interoperable data," flowing freely open and secure platforms, helping provide insights for better decision-making on the part of consumers and health systems alike – whether enabling better care delivery or offering insights for day-to-day wellness.

We reported on the study when it was first published in January, but found its premise worth revisiting as we explore the various ways digital transformation is taking shape today – and how it will continue to play out in the future.

The term "radically interoperable data" is exciting, after all – especially from this vantage point, where basic sending and receiving is still a big challenge for many hospitals. But Biel says it will be a reality within the next 20 years or so.

"It really means access to and curation of a very large number and wide ranging set of data that includes individual health data, environmental data, social trade, financial data, institutional data," he explained. "The radical part is that it can be accessed in real-time and analyzed for patterns that impact someone's health and wellness. It can bring insights and serve them essentially up to the consumer where they are, real-time and always available."

By 2040, as Deloitte sees it, empowered consumers will be able to "essentially cross index and intermingle different types of data that today are probably in vastly different places that are not accessible to each other and not standardized in any way," said Biel.

"Imagine a future state where you wake up in the morning and your in-home device basically tells you that it has noticed that the pollen count has risen you know outside, and that the forecast is showing that the pollen count is going to be high for the next few hours and then essentially it's going to burn off by noon," he said.

"The interoperable insight engine knows that you're an asthma patient, and also that you have a jog scheduled at 7:30 in the morning, and essentially recommends to you that you don't  go out and take that jog – that you wait until after the pollen count has dropped, has rescheduled your afternoon meetings for the morning when you were going to take your jog, so now there's open period on your calendar where you can do that.

"And, by the way," he added, "it's noticed that you're almost out of connected inhalers so automatically reorder them for you, and a drone dropped them at your doorstep overnight."

7-year cycles of innovation

Biel concedes that right now, despite all the hard work from very smart and forward thinking stakeholders on the vendor, policymaker and provider sides, healthcare is still "far, far, far, from radically operable – "we're probably barely even sitting upright so we can start crawling."

That said, "we're at the front end of a 20 to 30 year industry transformation," he said. "The industry forces and the disruption that's upon us are true indicators that we're going to be going through a cycle of innovation – and multiple waves of innovation."

Indeed, Deloitte's choice of the year 2040 isn't arbitrary. It's 21 years from now for a reason.

"We've determined that innovation happens in seven-year waves, essentially, and that big industry transformation typically takes around three innovation cycles," Biel explained. "Right now, we're sort of at the front end of the first wave."

From a technology point of view, there's a "surplus of innovative digital point solutions, but all not really connected and all very difficult to implement," he said. "There's also an unprecedented pace of clinical innovation. Think about the fact that 10 or 15 years ago it took over a billion dollars to do the first DNA sequencing and thousands and thousands of man hours. And now, you can you can essentially do it over the Internet for $150 – and it'll be probably under a hundred dollars soon."

But if technology and medicine are both making big strides, there are still some major current impediments to the future we all want.

For one thing, consumers are "disenfranchised and unsatisfied in a very significant way," said Biel. For another, "we have an unsustainable economic outlook. We're looking at healthcare spending coming up over 20 percent of GDP in the next few years. Longevity is increasing. Medicare will run out of money when people start living to 150 years old."

Those factors and others – driven largely by the "non-entrenched outside players who are coming into the market," unencumbered by healthcare's traditional incentive structures – are going to help "accelerate the kind of interoperability that we think is going to ultimately take hold and drive a whole new health ecosystem and help the economy," he said.

But more traditional entities – the federal government, say – have an important place at the table too, said Biel – who's encouraged by CMS' and ONC's proposed interoperability rules.

"We've finally gotten to a place where the government is really trying to push things along more aggressively," he said. "Seema Verma and some of the others that are sitting up on Capitol Hill are incredibly enlightened, and are trying to move the government in the right direction. So I think those things are very helpful and sends a clear signal to all the players that we have to consider and think about these things more seriously.

And those rules – aimed at established health systems and longtime health IT vendors – are meant to send the message to them that the old ways are over, and it's time to adopt more of a "2040" mindset.

"I think there is deep interest by all players," said Biel. "I think the entrenched players are deeply interested in the technology and the insights that they can derive through data. But I think they are less incentivized to actually try to break the business models that are funding them today.

But I do see, within those organizations you see a lot of organizations developing pretty sophisticated data and analytic strategies: Putting in place chief digital officers and chief health information officers; developing interoperability centers of excellence. They're starting to really take a look at what they need to do to share data."

But the public and private sectors will need to work in tandem to truly enable this two-decade progress toward radical interoperability, said Biel.

"We're starting to see, which is also encouraging, the non-traditional and traditional players spending time together and pairing up and looking at partnerships and ways that they can bring their different skills and capabilities together to create something innovative and new," he said.

"So those all give me hope that this is going to happen. And I do think that over time at the end of the day the consumer, ultimately, and the lack of sustainability of the healthcare economy are going to ultimately drive us to this place. You sort of have nowhere else to go but to innovate in a way that breaks the mold."
 

Digital Transformation in Healthcare

In May, we'll talk to experts and professionals on the front lines about what's really happening today with the digital transformation in healthcare and what hospital executives need to be doing right now.

Twitter: @MikeMiliardHITN
Email the writer: mike.miliard@himssmedia.com

Healthcare IT News is a publication of HIMSS Media.

Special Report: 
]]>
WHO rolls out free health product directory http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/who-rolls-out-free-health-product-directory http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/who-rolls-out-free-health-product-directory Tue, 21 May 2019 08:32:39 CDT tsullivan at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy The World Health Organization announced the launch of the Health Product Profile Directory, a resource to help promote research and development for products to combat neglected diseases and threats to global health. WHY IT MATTERS This includes antimicrobial resistance and diseases with pandemic potential, and the resource will also serve to guide the development of health products for which there are limited markets or incentives for research and development. The free-to-use online resource, created and developed by TDR, the Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases, provides a searchable database of profiles for health products needed to tackle pressing health issues in global health including those prioritized by WHO. The Directory currently contains 196 product profiles developed by 24 agencies, of which 191 describe a product with an infectious disease as the target, with the top four diseases with product profiles listed as tuberculosis, malaria, HIV and Chagas. While the Directory has been launched with a focus on infectious diseases, the WHO plans to update and grow the content, as well as invite submissions of product profiles in other priority areas such as non-communicable diseases and antimicrobial resistance. ON THE RECORD “As the first global public good launched by WHO’s new Science Division, the Directory exemplifies our effort to shape the global health research agenda to achieve health for all,” WHO chief scientist Dr. Soumya Swaminathan said in a statement. The Directory includes profiles developed by WHO and other agencies, which can be accessed through the organizations Global Observatory on health R&D, where other key resources to analyze R&D can be found. So far the Directory contains just five product profiles for conditions other than infectious diseases--one vaccine for breast cancer and four contraception technologies. “In an R&D landscape which is increasingly complicated to navigate, we welcome this directory, which will help us ensure that new malaria products that are developed are able to be accessed and used by the populations that need them,” David Reddy, CEO of Medicines for Malaria Venture, said in a statement. WHAT ELSE TO KNOW A February report from the WHO found that each year, hundreds of billions of dollars are spent on research and development (R&D) into new or improved health products and processes, ranging from medicines to vaccines to diagnostics. However, the report also noted the way these funds are distributed and spent is often poorly aligned with global public health needs. The announcement of the directory comes in the wake of recent, wide-ranging reforms at the WHO, which included the creation of a new Science Division led by Dr Swaminathan. The division was established to ensure the WHO anticipates and stays on top of the latest scientific developments to better identify opportunities to improve global health, and ensure the standard of WHO’s core technical functions, including norms and standards and research. Digital Transformation in Healthcare In May, we'll talk to experts and professionals on the front lines about what's really happening today with the digital transformation in healthcare and what hospital executives need to be doing right now. Nathan Eddy is a healthcare and technology freelancer based in Berlin. Email the writer: nathaneddy@gmail.com Twitter: @dropdeaded209  Healthcare IT News is a HIMSS Media publication.  Special Report: 

The World Health Organization announced the launch of the Health Product Profile Directory, a resource to help promote research and development for products to combat neglected diseases and threats to global health.

WHY IT MATTERS

This includes antimicrobial resistance and diseases with pandemic potential, and the resource will also serve to guide the development of health products for which there are limited markets or incentives for research and development.

The free-to-use online resource, created and developed by TDR, the Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases, provides a searchable database of profiles for health products needed to tackle pressing health issues in global health including those prioritized by WHO.

The Directory currently contains 196 product profiles developed by 24 agencies, of which 191 describe a product with an infectious disease as the target, with the top four diseases with product profiles listed as tuberculosis, malaria, HIV and Chagas.

While the Directory has been launched with a focus on infectious diseases, the WHO plans to update and grow the content, as well as invite submissions of product profiles in other priority areas such as non-communicable diseases and antimicrobial resistance.

ON THE RECORD

“As the first global public good launched by WHO’s new Science Division, the Directory exemplifies our effort to shape the global health research agenda to achieve health for all,” WHO chief scientist Dr. Soumya Swaminathan said in a statement.

The Directory includes profiles developed by WHO and other agencies, which can be accessed through the organizations Global Observatory on health R&D, where other key resources to analyze R&D can be found.

So far the Directory contains just five product profiles for conditions other than infectious diseases--one vaccine for breast cancer and four contraception technologies.

“In an R&D landscape which is increasingly complicated to navigate, we welcome this directory, which will help us ensure that new malaria products that are developed are able to be accessed and used by the populations that need them,” David Reddy, CEO of Medicines for Malaria Venture, said in a statement.

WHAT ELSE TO KNOW

A February report from the WHO found that each year, hundreds of billions of dollars are spent on research and development (R&D) into new or improved health products and processes, ranging from medicines to vaccines to diagnostics.

However, the report also noted the way these funds are distributed and spent is often poorly aligned with global public health needs.

The announcement of the directory comes in the wake of recent, wide-ranging reforms at the WHO, which included the creation of a new Science Division led by Dr Swaminathan.

The division was established to ensure the WHO anticipates and stays on top of the latest scientific developments to better identify opportunities to improve global health, and ensure the standard of WHO’s core technical functions, including norms and standards and research.

Digital Transformation in Healthcare

In May, we'll talk to experts and professionals on the front lines about what's really happening today with the digital transformation in healthcare and what hospital executives need to be doing right now.

Nathan Eddy is a healthcare and technology freelancer based in Berlin.

Email the writer: nathaneddy@gmail.com

Twitter: @dropdeaded209 

Healthcare IT News is a HIMSS Media publication. 

Special Report: 
]]>
Novel technique reduces obstruction risk in heart valve replacement http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/novel-technique-reduces-obstruction-risk-heart-valve-replacement http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/novel-technique-reduces-obstruction-risk-heart-valve-replacement Mon, 20 May 2019 18:00:00 CDT NIH News Release The transcatheter approach increases treatment options for high-risk patients. ]]> Large portion of patients with mild persistent asthma and low sputum eosinophils respond equally well to inhaled corticosteroids as placebo http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/large-portion-patients-mild-persistent-asthma-low-sputum-eosinophils-respond-equally-well-inhaled-corticosteroids-placebo http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/large-portion-patients-mild-persistent-asthma-low-sputum-eosinophils-respond-equally-well-inhaled-corticosteroids-placebo Sun, 19 May 2019 15:15:00 CDT NIH News Release “Low eosinophil” biomarkers found in nearly three-quarters of people with mild persistent asthma. ]]> Integrated stepped alcohol treatment for people in HIV care improves both HIV and alcohol outcomes http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/integrated-stepped-alcohol-treatment-people-hiv-care-improves-both-hiv-alcohol-outcomes http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/integrated-stepped-alcohol-treatment-people-hiv-care-improves-both-hiv-alcohol-outcomes Fri, 17 May 2019 22:30:00 CDT NIH News Release Increasing the intensity of treatment for alcohol use disorder over time improves alcohol-related outcomes among people with HIV. ]]> HIV Vaccine Awareness Day 2019 — May 18, 2019 http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/hiv-vaccine-awareness-day-2019-may-18-2019 http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/hiv-vaccine-awareness-day-2019-may-18-2019 Fri, 17 May 2019 21:00:00 CDT NIH News Release Statement by Anthony S. Fauci, M.D., Director, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, and Maureen M. Goodenow, Ph.D., NIH Associate Director for AIDS Research and Director, Office of AIDS Research ]]> EHR training is biggest predictor of user satisfaction, experts say http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/ehr-training-biggest-predictor-user-satisfaction-experts-say http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/ehr-training-biggest-predictor-user-satisfaction-experts-say Fri, 17 May 2019 14:56:05 CDT at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com A better clinician experience makes for higher-quality patient care, according to a new report from KLAS' Arch Collaborative, which makes the case for bigger investment in end-user education. Project to deter opioid tampering wins top Addiction Science Award http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/project-deter-opioid-tampering-wins-top-addiction-science-award http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/project-deter-opioid-tampering-wins-top-addiction-science-award Fri, 17 May 2019 14:45:00 CDT NIH News Release NIDA announces awardees at the 2019 Intel International Science and Engineering Fair. ]]> Early weight-loss surgery may improve type 2 diabetes, blood pressure outcomes http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/early-weight-loss-surgery-may-improve-type-2-diabetes-blood-pressure-outcomes http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/early-weight-loss-surgery-may-improve-type-2-diabetes-blood-pressure-outcomes Thu, 16 May 2019 15:45:00 CDT NIH News Release NIH-funded study followed teens, adults with long-term obesity five years after gastric bypass. ]]> Human antibody reveals hidden vulnerability in influenza virus http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/human-antibody-reveals-hidden-vulnerability-influenza-virus http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/human-antibody-reveals-hidden-vulnerability-influenza-virus Thu, 16 May 2019 15:00:00 CDT NIH News Release Discovery by NIAID-funded researchers could aid quest for universal flu vaccine. ]]> Joint Commission debuts hospital clinical quality metrics platform http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/north-america/joint-commission-debuts-hospital-clinical-quality-metrics-platform http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/north-america/joint-commission-debuts-hospital-clinical-quality-metrics-platform Thu, 16 May 2019 09:53:11 CDT tsullivan at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy The nonprofit Joint Commission announced the release of the Direct Data Submission Platform (DDSP), which will provide hospitals with near real-time quality metrics. WHY IT MATTERS The platform will make clinical quality language-based eCQMs available to providers in an execution environment where they can generate and use the results continuously. The Joint Commission partnered with digital healthcare provider Apervita to provide the cloud platform underpinning this program by enabling providers to specify, develop, test, and execute eCQMs, as well as create and distribute applications that use them, in the cloud at scale. Apervita is used by approximately 1,000 hospitals nationwide and helps health systems with streamlining, standardizing and auditing quality measures, operational metrics and care pathways. The clinical quality language (CQL) standard for measures is used by The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services for 2019 eCQM reporting, and endorsed by HL7 International. The language brings together the underlying logic of quality measurement, clinical pathways, clinical decision support and more — with DDSP, the Joint Commission can now use a single environment to specify, develop, test, and distribute CQL measures for use. The nonprofit Joint Commission, which bills itself as the nation's oldest and largest standards-setting and accrediting body in health care, seeks to continuously improve health care for the public. It works in collaboration with other stakeholders to evaluate health care organizations and inspire them to provide safe and more effective care at the highest quality and value. The organization is making the DDSP and quality measure results continuously available, which should allow providers to measure and improve performance in near real-time without additional outside vendors. ON THE RECORD "What we've accomplished in the last two years with the Direct Data Submission platform has delivered ongoing value for our accredited hospitals," David Baker, EVP for the division of healthcare quality evaluation at The Joint Commission, said in a statement. "We're thrilled to build on that value with continuous quality insights that empower providers to make real-time performance improvements." THE BIGGER TREND According to a recent McKinsey report, leaders in the healthcare services and technology market will be large-scale platform players who act as “ecosystem integrators … integrating a range of different healthcare products and services.” In response to this potential, venture capital and private equity investors alone deployed at least $60 billion into healthcare services from 2012 to 2017 — a figure that excludes the internal investments made by industry participants, such as payers and technology firms. Nathan Eddy is a healthcare and technology freelancer based in Berlin. Email the writer: nathaneddy@gmail.com Twitter: @dropdeaded209  Healthcare IT News is a HIMSS Media publication.  Special Report: 

The nonprofit Joint Commission announced the release of the Direct Data Submission Platform (DDSP), which will provide hospitals with near real-time quality metrics.

WHY IT MATTERS

The platform will make clinical quality language-based eCQMs available to providers in an execution environment where they can generate and use the results continuously.

The Joint Commission partnered with digital healthcare provider Apervita to provide the cloud platform underpinning this program by enabling providers to specify, develop, test, and execute eCQMs, as well as create and distribute applications that use them, in the cloud at scale.

Apervita is used by approximately 1,000 hospitals nationwide and helps health systems with streamlining, standardizing and auditing quality measures, operational metrics and care pathways.

The clinical quality language (CQL) standard for measures is used by The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services for 2019 eCQM reporting, and endorsed by HL7 International.

The language brings together the underlying logic of quality measurement, clinical pathways, clinical decision support and more — with DDSP, the Joint Commission can now use a single environment to specify, develop, test, and distribute CQL measures for use.

The nonprofit Joint Commission, which bills itself as the nation's oldest and largest standards-setting and accrediting body in health care, seeks to continuously improve health care for the public.

It works in collaboration with other stakeholders to evaluate health care organizations and inspire them to provide safe and more effective care at the highest quality and value.

The organization is making the DDSP and quality measure results continuously available, which should allow providers to measure and improve performance in near real-time without additional outside vendors.

ON THE RECORD

"What we've accomplished in the last two years with the Direct Data Submission platform has delivered ongoing value for our accredited hospitals," David Baker, EVP for the division of healthcare quality evaluation at The Joint Commission, said in a statement. "We're thrilled to build on that value with continuous quality insights that empower providers to make real-time performance improvements."

THE BIGGER TREND

According to a recent McKinsey report, leaders in the healthcare services and technology market will be large-scale platform players who act as “ecosystem integrators … integrating a range of different healthcare products and services.”

In response to this potential, venture capital and private equity investors alone deployed at least $60 billion into healthcare services from 2012 to 2017 — a figure that excludes the internal investments made by industry participants, such as payers and technology firms.

Nathan Eddy is a healthcare and technology freelancer based in Berlin.

Email the writer: nathaneddy@gmail.com

Twitter: @dropdeaded209 

Healthcare IT News is a HIMSS Media publication. 

Special Report: 
]]>
Private hospitals to display prices of drugs, says Thai Government http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/asia-pacific/private-hospitals-display-prices-drugs-says-thai-government http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/asia-pacific/private-hospitals-display-prices-drugs-says-thai-government Wed, 15 May 2019 03:06:16 CDT deankoh at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy Private hospitals in Thailand will have to display the price of medicines so that consumers can make better-informed decisions prior to purchase, starting from this week. According to a report by the National News Bureau of Thailand, the country’s Ministry of Commerce has implemented a new measure after announcing medicine and medical supplies as controlled items, requiring hospitals to display pricing of some 3,000 items via QR codes allowing the general public to make comparisons. Deputy Minister of Commerce Chutima Bunyapraphasara said that the central committee on pricing of goods and services’ meeting has agreed to authorise the Department of Internal Trade to implement control measures for pricing of medicine, medical supplies and medical services. The measure will require private hospitals, manufacturers, importers and wholesalers to report sales prices to the department, which will then later be published on the department’s website. Any changes to pricing must be informed 15 days in advance. On January 9 this year, the Ministry of Commerce approved plans to put medical-related fees, including drugs, supplies and service charges, on the price control list of the government’s central committee on prices of goods and services. The order for private hospitals to display prices of drugs is a direct follow-up from the subcommittee formed to work out measures to control medical-related fees. Failure to comply with the new measure will result in up to 1 year imprisonment or up to 20,000 baht fine, or both. Private hospitals, which refuse to issue prescriptions to patients for medicine purchases outside the hospital, will face up to 5 years imprisonment, up to 100,000 baht fine, or both. The Department of Internal Trade will be inviting representatives from hospitals to explain the measure, and will consider further measures to control medicine and medical service pricing in the future. Special Report: 

Private hospitals in Thailand will have to display the price of medicines so that consumers can make better-informed decisions prior to purchase, starting from this week.

According to a report by the National News Bureau of Thailand, the country’s Ministry of Commerce has implemented a new measure after announcing medicine and medical supplies as controlled items, requiring hospitals to display pricing of some 3,000 items via QR codes allowing the general public to make comparisons.

Deputy Minister of Commerce Chutima Bunyapraphasara said that the central committee on pricing of goods and services’ meeting has agreed to authorise the Department of Internal Trade to implement control measures for pricing of medicine, medical supplies and medical services.

The measure will require private hospitals, manufacturers, importers and wholesalers to report sales prices to the department, which will then later be published on the department’s website. Any changes to pricing must be informed 15 days in advance.

On January 9 this year, the Ministry of Commerce approved plans to put medical-related fees, including drugs, supplies and service charges, on the price control list of the government’s central committee on prices of goods and services. The order for private hospitals to display prices of drugs is a direct follow-up from the subcommittee formed to work out measures to control medical-related fees.

Failure to comply with the new measure will result in up to 1 year imprisonment or up to 20,000 baht fine, or both. Private hospitals, which refuse to issue prescriptions to patients for medicine purchases outside the hospital, will face up to 5 years imprisonment, up to 100,000 baht fine, or both.

The Department of Internal Trade will be inviting representatives from hospitals to explain the measure, and will consider further measures to control medicine and medical service pricing in the future.

Special Report: 
]]>
New Zealand’s MOH to open up national health data with FHIR http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/asia-pacific/new-zealand-s-moh-open-national-health-data-fhir http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/asia-pacific/new-zealand-s-moh-open-national-health-data-fhir Sun, 12 May 2019 23:19:14 CDT deankoh at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy New Zealand’s Ministry of Health will provide access to two core national systems - the National Health Index (NHI) and Health Practitioner Index (HPI) – using FHIR interfaces. Group manager digital strategy and investment Darren Douglass said that by improving access to these core data sets as FHIR resources, the Ministry expects to make it easier for healthcare organisations and vendors to use them within their health applications. The staged release of NHI and HPI production FHIR APIs (Application Programming Interfaces) is planned from mid-2020.     “New Zealand has adopted the HL7 FHIR (Health Level 7, Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources) standard for exchanging healthcare information electronically as a core component of our interoperability architecture and standards, along with SNOMED CT and other health terminology services,” said Douglass. The NHI is a unique identifier assigned to every person in New Zealand and the HPI identifies health professionals. “These two foundational data sets are already widely used across the NZ health sector so it made sense to provide access to these first,” he said.   HL7NZ chair emeritus David Hay is working with the Ministry on the project and says there are big gains to be had by opening up health data to multiple players. Existing players like GP and hospital system suppliers generally already have access, but the interfaces are not that standardised or widely used, he explained. “My vision is that we have an eco-system where smaller specialist systems can be created that nevertheless utilise these core national systems,” said Hay. “This is a critical first step on the road to allowing that and I’m really delighted the Ministry is making this step and putting funding behind getting this working.” Hay is assisting with the design and community engagement as a large part of FHIR is the community of people who can assist with both the design of the interfaces and implementation of them. Initial work has been on the NHI interface with a draft design due to be completed before a HL7 FHIR and SNOMED CT Implementation Workshop in Auckland on June 19, where it will be tested by the community. Hay said by involving the FHIR community in the process, it ensures changes to the design are made early on in the process rather than needing expensive re-working at a later date. Once the necessary security and privacy protections are in place, Hay hopes to see other data sets exposed in the same way, such as prescribing data. “FHIR is emerging internationally as the next generation of interoperability standards,” he said. “New Zealand has the potential of becoming leaders in some of this space because we are relatively small, we have national systems already in place and we’re willing to give things a try.” Douglass said the changes are part of the wider Digital Health Strategic Framework objective of accessible trusted information. Some read-only APIs are planned for earlier release to add and update functionality and guides for testing and implementation will be released in advance of each production release. This article first appeared on eHealthNews.nz. Special Report: 

New Zealand’s Ministry of Health will provide access to two core national systems - the National Health Index (NHI) and Health Practitioner Index (HPI) – using FHIR interfaces.

Group manager digital strategy and investment Darren Douglass said that by improving access to these core data sets as FHIR resources, the Ministry expects to make it easier for healthcare organisations and vendors to use them within their health applications.

The staged release of NHI and HPI production FHIR APIs (Application Programming Interfaces) is planned from mid-2020.    

“New Zealand has adopted the HL7 FHIR (Health Level 7, Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources) standard for exchanging healthcare information electronically as a core component of our interoperability architecture and standards, along with SNOMED CT and other health terminology services,” said Douglass.

The NHI is a unique identifier assigned to every person in New Zealand and the HPI identifies health professionals.

“These two foundational data sets are already widely used across the NZ health sector so it made sense to provide access to these first,” he said.  
HL7NZ chair emeritus David Hay is working with the Ministry on the project and says there are big gains to be had by opening up health data to multiple players.

Existing players like GP and hospital system suppliers generally already have access, but the interfaces are not that standardised or widely used, he explained.

“My vision is that we have an eco-system where smaller specialist systems can be created that nevertheless utilise these core national systems,” said Hay.

“This is a critical first step on the road to allowing that and I’m really delighted the Ministry is making this step and putting funding behind getting this working.”

Hay is assisting with the design and community engagement as a large part of FHIR is the community of people who can assist with both the design of the interfaces and implementation of them.

Initial work has been on the NHI interface with a draft design due to be completed before a HL7 FHIR and SNOMED CT Implementation Workshop in Auckland on June 19, where it will be tested by the community.

Hay said by involving the FHIR community in the process, it ensures changes to the design are made early on in the process rather than needing expensive re-working at a later date.

Once the necessary security and privacy protections are in place, Hay hopes to see other data sets exposed in the same way, such as prescribing data.

“FHIR is emerging internationally as the next generation of interoperability standards,” he said.

“New Zealand has the potential of becoming leaders in some of this space because we are relatively small, we have national systems already in place and we’re willing to give things a try.”

Douglass said the changes are part of the wider Digital Health Strategic Framework objective of accessible trusted information.

Some read-only APIs are planned for earlier release to add and update functionality and guides for testing and implementation will be released in advance of each production release.

This article first appeared on eHealthNews.nz.

Special Report: 
]]>
Nurses are well-positioned to lead innovation and digital transformation http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/nurses-are-well-positioned-lead-innovation-and-digital-transformation http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/nurses-are-well-positioned-lead-innovation-and-digital-transformation Mon, 06 May 2019 12:53:58 CDT at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com More and more health systems are taking steps to "fully unleash nurse innovators at the leadership level," a new report shows, tapping their specialized expertise for technology deployment, process improvement, patient experience and more. 5 steps to digital transformation for healthcare http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/5-steps-digital-transformation-healthcare http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/5-steps-digital-transformation-healthcare Mon, 06 May 2019 08:04:43 CDT at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com It’s a matter of change management – and there are some applicable best practices. Philips, DHS report vulnerability in EMR platform http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/philips-dhs-report-vulnerability-emr-platform http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/philips-dhs-report-vulnerability-emr-platform Fri, 03 May 2019 08:48:46 CDT at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com Company says the security flaw has not been exploited yet and urges customers to update to most recent version. Where health systems are using analytics the most http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/where-health-systems-are-using-analytics-most http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/where-health-systems-are-using-analytics-most Thu, 02 May 2019 08:20:57 CDT at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com New research points to care quality measures and finance as the top functions for analytics usage today. KLAS: Epic, Cerner still lead EHR pack http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/klas-epic-cerner-still-lead-ehr-pack http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/klas-epic-cerner-still-lead-ehr-pack Wed, 01 May 2019 14:04:04 CDT at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com The research firm says 2018 was the busiest in recent years for EHR market flux, and recent purchasing decisions show an evolution in the electronic health record landscape. Focus on interoperability: What we learned http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/focus-interoperability-what-we-learned http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/focus-interoperability-what-we-learned Tue, 30 Apr 2019 09:25:51 CDT at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com Top takeaways from a month of reporting on today's current state and the future of health data sharing. HIMSS names new Global Chief Operating & Strategy Officer http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/himss-names-new-global-chief-operating-strategy-officer http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/himss-names-new-global-chief-operating-strategy-officer Mon, 29 Apr 2019 13:26:31 CDT at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com Dr. Sebastian Krolop, a physician, economist and technology consultant, will help chart worldwide plans and policies for HIMSS. He says he's focused on member experience and enabling more patient-centered healthcare. How FHIR 4 will drive interoperability progress in healthcare http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/how-fhir-4-will-drive-interoperability-progress-healthcare http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/how-fhir-4-will-drive-interoperability-progress-healthcare Thu, 25 Apr 2019 12:10:15 CDT at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com Experts from across health IT, including members of the HL7 board and advisory council, say the new standard can do big things for data exchange, but it's not a cure-all. Value-based care and rethinking the patient experience http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/value-based-care-and-rethinking-patient-experience http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/value-based-care-and-rethinking-patient-experience Wed, 24 Apr 2019 21:57:38 CDT at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com Healthcare leader representatives from Singapore, Australia and the Philippines took centre stage as the HIMSS Singapore eHealth & Health 2.0 Summit officially kicked off on April 23 with the CXO Panel session on the topic of disruptive innovation for value-based care.  Physicians should think twice about promoting medical credit cards to their patients http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/finance-experts-warn-medical-credit-cards?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/finance-experts-warn-medical-credit-cards?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Tue, 20 Feb 2018 10:15:20 CST Joanne Finnegan at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Consumers use credit cards to pay for everything (including the kitchen sink), and the latest trend has people using medical credit cards to pay for healthcare services. But financial experts are warning practices about the pitfalls of promoting so-called medical credit cards to their patients, says the Healthcare Financial Management Association. Trump administration issues proposed rule to expand short-term insurance plans http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/trump-administration-short-term-insurance-rule?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/trump-administration-short-term-insurance-rule?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Tue, 20 Feb 2018 09:56:31 CST Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare A proposed rule issued by three federal agencies on Tuesday would expand limits for short-term health insurance plans from three months to 12 months. CMS's Seema Verma dismissed concerns that the policy shift would destabilize the individual market by siphoning off healthy individuals, arguing the change will have "virtually no impact" on ACA premiums. Under Trump, HHS rolls back policies aimed at protecting LGBT rights http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/trump-hhs-lgbt-rights-alex-azar?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/trump-hhs-lgbt-rights-alex-azar?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Tue, 20 Feb 2018 09:31:52 CST Leslie Small at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Though President Donald Trump promised to support LGBT causes during the 2016 campaign, under his watch the Department of Health and Human Services had rolled back several initiatives aimed at protecting the rights of that population. New HHS Secretary Alex Azar could take the department in a different direction. Study: Community navigators can reduce the high cost of 'superusers' in hospital settings http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/patient-engagement/community-navigators-superusers-hospital-visits-decrease?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/patient-engagement/community-navigators-superusers-hospital-visits-decrease?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Tue, 20 Feb 2018 09:08:46 CST Paige Minemyer at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare "Superusers," those costly patients who utilize high levels of hospital care, are a significant burden on the healthcare system. But a new study suggests that pairing them with community navigators can reduce their use of hospital services. Researchers in Tennessee found that the intervention reduced their healthcare encounters by 39%. Patients lack information about imaging exams, study finds http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/patients-lack-information-imaging-exams-radiology-study-yale?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/patients-lack-information-imaging-exams-radiology-study-yale?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Sat, 17 Feb 2018 20:14:46 CST Joanne Finnegan at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Doctors can do a better job providing patients with information before they go for an imaging exam, a new study found. One in five patients shows up for an imaging exam without any information about the test they are about to undergo, according to the study published in Radiology. Most for-profit hospitals will benefit from U.S. tax overhaul, but 2 big-name providers stand to gain the most http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/most-for-profit-hospitals-will-benefit-from-us-tax-overhaul-but-two-big-name-providers?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/most-for-profit-hospitals-will-benefit-from-us-tax-overhaul-but-two-big-name-providers?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 16 Feb 2018 15:23:18 CST Ilene MacDonald at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Most for-profit hospitals stand to gain from the changes to the U.S. tax laws, according to a new Moody’s Investors Service report. But HCA Healthcare and Universal Health Service will be the biggest beneficiaries and could see their operating cash flows go up by 10% or more. North Carolina attorney general seeks more details on Atrium Health-UNC Health Care merger  http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/atrium-health-university-north-carolina-merger-ag-wants-details?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/atrium-health-university-north-carolina-merger-ag-wants-details?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 16 Feb 2018 15:12:13 CST Paige Minemyer at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare North Carolina's attorney general is asking Atrium Health and UNC Health Care to provide more information on their merger plans. AG Josh Stein said he intends to ensure that the planned merger doesn't increase patient costs. 5 medical conditions that cost more than $15K per hospital stay http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/5-medical-conditions-cost-more-than-15k-per-hospital-stay?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/5-medical-conditions-cost-more-than-15k-per-hospital-stay?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 16 Feb 2018 14:01:34 CST Ilene MacDonald at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Heart valve disorders lead the list of the most expensive medical conditions with the highest average cost per inpatient stay, according to an analysis by Business Insider based on 2016 data from Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project. Heart valve disorders, on average, cost $41,878 per stay, the analysis found. Anthem alters controversial ER coverage policies http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/anthem-er-coverage-policy-changes?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/anthem-er-coverage-policy-changes?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 16 Feb 2018 11:50:13 CST Leslie Small at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Seeking to address mounting concerns from providers and other stakeholders, Anthem has made changes to policies it previously rolled out that restrict coverage for emergency room visits. The insurer has implemented a series of “always pay” exceptions for certain circumstances, like when the patient received any kind of surgery or an MRI or CT scan. VA head Shulkin to reimburse disputed European travel expenses, but Dems call for hearing over controversy http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/healthcare/va-head-s-european-trip-drama-continues-shulkin-will-reimburse-disputed-expenses-but-won?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/healthcare/va-head-s-european-trip-drama-continues-shulkin-will-reimburse-disputed-expenses-but-won?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 16 Feb 2018 10:30:06 CST Ilene MacDonald at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Veterans Affairs Secretary David Shulkin, M.D., says he will reimburse travel expenses that were the subject of an internal investigation into a trip he took to Europe this summer, but that may not put an end to the controversy. One lawmaker has called for Shulkin’s resignation, and four Democrats have requested a hearing about the trip.