MedClimate Health News Daily http://medclimate.com/feed en-us Copyright MedClimate, Inc2019 VA unveils new app to connect veterans with care, help with data sharing http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/va-unveils-new-app-connect-veterans-care-help-data-sharing http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/va-unveils-new-app-connect-veterans-care-help-data-sharing Fri, 16 Aug 2019 15:38:50 CDT at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com Launchpad helps streamline access for both vets and their caregivers, coordinating various VA apps in one place and enabling easier sharing of EHR data and access to telehealth. VA unveils new app to connect veterans with care, help with data sharing http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/va-unveils-new-app-connect-veterans-care-help-data-sharing http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/va-unveils-new-app-connect-veterans-care-help-data-sharing Fri, 16 Aug 2019 15:38:50 CDT mmiliard at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs this week announced a new mobile application it says will help simplify and organize existing resources into one  location to help manage health care needs. WHY IT MATTERS The Launchpad App for Veterans brings several VA applications aimed at veterans and their caregivers into one location, and will be updated with news ones as they're developed. It combines VA health information and resources into five categories, meant to make the many healthcare apps from the agency easily accessible for those who need them: Manage My Health gather apps that help veterans share medical records, refill prescriptions and make appointments. Communicate with My Care Team features apps that help connect with VA care teams – including telehealth functionalities such as the ability to upload homemade videos, real-time face-to-face appointments, sending and receiving secure messages to and from care teams and health-related text messages. Share My Vital Health Information with My Care Team connects veterans with their caregivers if they request information about their health if invited; vets can also use these apps for their own self-care. Improve My Mental Health gathers apps to help veterans help deal with specific conditions related to mental health. Improve My Life features an array of apps to help with smoking cessation, weight loss and more. THE LARGER TREND The VA says Launchpad is meant as a one-stop location giving veterans access to smartphone and tablet-based technology to help them manage their care across the VA system; view and share your VA electronic health records; share other health information with care providers; more easily book appointments and refill prescriptions. In other VA news this week, the agency announced a partnership with the U.S. Department of Defense to help streamline the supply chain for more efficient and higher-quality care. ON THE RECORD "VA has developed dozens of apps for Veterans to take charge of their health care," said VA Secretary Robert Wilkie. "VA Launchpad makes it easier to have these important tools available at your fingertips." Twitter: @MikeMiliardHITN Email the writer: mike.miliard@himssmedia.com Healthcare IT News is a publication of HIMSS Media. Special Report: 

The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs this week announced a new mobile application it says will help simplify and organize existing resources into one  location to help manage health care needs.

WHY IT MATTERS
The Launchpad App for Veterans brings several VA applications aimed at veterans and their caregivers into one location, and will be updated with news ones as they're developed.

It combines VA health information and resources into five categories, meant to make the many healthcare apps from the agency easily accessible for those who need them:

  • Manage My Health gather apps that help veterans share medical records, refill prescriptions and make appointments.
  • Communicate with My Care Team features apps that help connect with VA care teams – including telehealth functionalities such as the ability to upload homemade videos, real-time face-to-face appointments, sending and receiving secure messages to and from care teams and health-related text messages.
  • Share My Vital Health Information with My Care Team connects veterans with their caregivers if they request information about their health if invited; vets can also use these apps for their own self-care.
  • Improve My Mental Health gathers apps to help veterans help deal with specific conditions related to mental health.
  • Improve My Life features an array of apps to help with smoking cessation, weight loss and more.

THE LARGER TREND
The VA says Launchpad is meant as a one-stop location giving veterans access to smartphone and tablet-based technology to help them manage their care across the VA system; view and share your VA electronic health records; share other health information with care providers; more easily book appointments and refill prescriptions.

In other VA news this week, the agency announced a partnership with the U.S. Department of Defense to help streamline the supply chain for more efficient and higher-quality care.

ON THE RECORD
"VA has developed dozens of apps for Veterans to take charge of their health care," said VA Secretary Robert Wilkie. "VA Launchpad makes it easier to have these important tools available at your fingertips."

Twitter: @MikeMiliardHITN
Email the writer: mike.miliard@himssmedia.com

Healthcare IT News is a publication of HIMSS Media.

Special Report: 
]]>
Critical security tips for provider CIOs using public clouds http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/critical-security-tips-provider-cios-using-public-clouds http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/critical-security-tips-provider-cios-using-public-clouds Fri, 16 Aug 2019 11:05:56 CDT at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com Two healthcare CIOs and one deputy CISO offer their expert advice to their peers, explaining how to ensure security is wrapped up tight when working with public clouds. Royal Hospital for Neuro-disability rolls out PatientSource EPR http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/europe/royal-hospital-neuro-disability-rolls-out-patientsource-epr http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/europe/royal-hospital-neuro-disability-rolls-out-patientsource-epr Fri, 16 Aug 2019 04:00:07 CDT at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com The independent medical charity in London says the system has reduced incidents of prescription error since it was introduced in April. Creating better health for all Australians through digital health http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/asia-pacific/creating-better-health-all-australians-through-digital-health http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/asia-pacific/creating-better-health-all-australians-through-digital-health Thu, 15 Aug 2019 19:27:41 CDT at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com With more than a decade of experience as a registered nurse, Angela Ryan combines her clinical experience with her knowledge in health informatics toward the practical, meaningful and integrated use of digital health tools in Australia. Creating better health for all Australians through digital health http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/asia-pacific/creating-better-health-all-australians-through-digital-health http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/asia-pacific/creating-better-health-all-australians-through-digital-health Thu, 15 Aug 2019 19:27:41 CDT deankoh at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy With more than a decade of experience as a registered nurse, Angela Ryan combines her clinical experience with her knowledge in health informatics toward the practical, meaningful and integrated use of digital health tools in Australia. In this interview with Healthcare IT News, she shares more on her role as the chief clinical information officer (CCIO) at the Australian Digital Health Agency (ADHA) and talks about why the My Health Record is a key pillar in Australia’s National Digital Health Strategy. Q. Could you tell us more about your role as CCIO of ADHA and your background in healthcare? A. In my role as chief clinical information officer at the Australian Digital Health Agency, I work collaboratively across the health system to develop and maintain strong relationships with key stakeholders in the community to promote adoption and meaningful clinical use of digital health services and technologies, to deliver benefit to all Australians. A key priority is ensuring strong clinical engagement with the National Digital Health Strategy and associated programs and services – including the My Health Record system – and clinical input and assurance into the design, development and delivery of digital health systems. The role provides clinical leadership for the implementation, advancement and optimisation of digital systems nationally. I’m a clinician with a background in health informatics, and decades of experience in hospitals and public sector organisations, with an emphasis on governance, design, development and deployment of digital health strategies and technologies. Before moving into digital health, I had more than 14 years’ experience as a registered nurse, including paediatric and adult intensive care. I am now able to apply my understanding of health systems and practice not just to optimise technology design and rollout, but to act as an effective agent of change, building engagement and momentum around transformational programs. Q. What are some of the latest projects/developments that you are currently working on at ADHA? A. The Australian Digital Health Agency is setting out the pathway to achieve our goals in the National Digital Health Strategy, to support the premise that “A workforce confidently using digital health technologies to deliver health and care will be required to address the technology adoption challenge and calls for supporting the workforce to better adapt to, use and embrace the changes and opportunities created by digital health innovation.” A digitally enabled workforce for Australia will benefit consumers, healthcare professionals and the broader health system. In addition, future innovations and approaches to healthcare delivery, such as applied data analytics, and technologies such as machine learning, artificial intelligence (AI) and advanced robotics, will require a shift in the skills mix of the healthcare workforce in order to obtain the greatest benefit of these advances for healthcare consumers. To support this, the Agency is undertaking a program to consult the health sector and other relevant stakeholders on strategies to address the enablement of the workforce and any perceived gaps. Our aim is to develop a holistic understanding of the potential skills and workforce shortages and develop strategies to address them. This will culminate in the development of a National Digital Health Workforce and Education Roadmap. The roadmap will be a focal point for a National Digital Health Workforce and Education Summit being planned for later in 2019. This event will bring together stakeholders from across the sector to consider the roadmap and agree the practical actions required to deliver the workforce Australia needs. Q. From your experience both as nurse and in healthcare informatics, what do you feel are the greatest challenges in the journey toward achieving better health outcomes through digital health? A. Striving to deliver real-time improvements in clinician workflow is the holy grail for me, but I know that we aren’t there yet. That said, l also know that many of my colleagues are deeply invested in this as an outcome, and recognise that to truly deliver on improvements in patient outcomes, we need to improve the way digital tools and technologies work inside healthcare environments. It might keep me awake at night, but I do believe we’ll see real change in the not-so-distant future. Q. In 2017, you were awarded a Churchill Fellowship to study methods to prevent patient harm through national digital health safety governance. Could you share with us some of your key insights/findings from the study, especially through your visits to the UK, USA and Canada? A. My Fellowship trip was life-changing and I met so many people who gave their time, their insights and knowledge so generously – Australia can undoubtedly benefit from this wealth of experience.  I developed a set of recommendations that drew on the overall findings and principles articulated within my Churchill report. I also drew on the premise of the ‘Health Information Technology (HIT) Safety Center’ model developed in the USA. I did this in part as it is the only fully elaborated model supported by an extensive evidence base, the structure of which is informed by learnings beyond the USA borders. The Center was originally recommended by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Report ‘Health IT and Patient Safety: Building Safer Systems for Better Care’, published in 2012, with a subsequent commitment by the Obama administration to establish the roadmap to develop the Center.  It was further endorsed through the USA Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act (FDASIA) of 2015. While the Center has not been implemented as it was originally envisioned, many of its proposed members are active in the ‘Partnership for Health IT Safety’, a multi-stakeholder collaborative of more than 50 organisations that come together to analyse safety events and hazards, identify, and share solutions and safe practices, and inform policymakers and the broader healthcare community about priorities for health IT safety. I contend that Australia should assemble a taskforce of experts from across the health sector, to include clinicians, consumers, government, researchers, policy makers and industry to develop the vision, mission, outcomes and roadmap for better coordinated digital health patient safety in Australia. The taskforce’s expressed purpose is to ensure digital health is safer for patients and will build upon the significant progress already made in Australia, and internationally. More information can be obtained here.  Q. You will be speaking about how the implementation of Australia’s National Digital Health Strategy is improving patient health outcomes through integration of digital health services at the upcoming HIMSS AsiaPac19 conference in Bangkok. Could you tell us more about the key pillars of the strategy? A. The key pillars of the Digital Health Strategy include the expansion of My Health Record, supporting secure messaging between clinical software and the development of an interoperable health system.  More than 90 per cent of Australians now have a My Health Record, 23 million clinical documents and 56 million medication prescription and dispense records have been uploaded, and close to 16,200 healthcare professional organisations are connected (as of 30 June 2019). As part of the expansion of My Health Record, the Agency is working with healthcare providers across the country to connect healthcare professionals to the My Health Record system and improve the information available to consumers who have a My Health Record. As more providers are connected and more information is uploaded, My Health Record will become increasingly useful in ensuring key health information can be viewed securely whenever and wherever it is needed.  The work we are undertaking to support secure messaging will give clinicians the ability to communicate with other professionals and their patients through secure digital channels and end dependence on paper-based correspondence and the fax machine. New industry standards to share correspondence digitally have been agreed and these are now being implemented. Through the development of an interoperable health system, we are working to set standards that will allow clinical data to be shared seamlessly and securely, in real time, by care professionals, patients, and citizens, with common understanding and meaning whether they are in or outside hospital. For example, this will give all clinicians and pharmacists access to electronic prescribing and dispensing of medicines, reducing the risk of medication errors for their patients. The Agency is leading a national consultation which will recommend the appropriate data and digital standards for connected healthcare by the end of 2019. Angela Ryan is a panelist at the opening keynote plenary happening on October 7 at the upcoming HIMSS AsiaPac19 Conference. She will also be giving a keynote titled “Digital Health, Better Health for All Australians” on October 8 during the conference. Early bird rates for conference registration are still ongoing and more details can be found here.  Special Report: 

With more than a decade of experience as a registered nurse, Angela Ryan combines her clinical experience with her knowledge in health informatics toward the practical, meaningful and integrated use of digital health tools in Australia. In this interview with Healthcare IT News, she shares more on her role as the chief clinical information officer (CCIO) at the Australian Digital Health Agency (ADHA) and talks about why the My Health Record is a key pillar in Australia’s National Digital Health Strategy.

Q. Could you tell us more about your role as CCIO of ADHA and your background in healthcare?

A. In my role as chief clinical information officer at the Australian Digital Health Agency, I work collaboratively across the health system to develop and maintain strong relationships with key stakeholders in the community to promote adoption and meaningful clinical use of digital health services and technologies, to deliver benefit to all Australians. A key priority is ensuring strong clinical engagement with the National Digital Health Strategy and associated programs and services – including the My Health Record system – and clinical input and assurance into the design, development and delivery of digital health systems. The role provides clinical leadership for the implementation, advancement and optimisation of digital systems nationally.

I’m a clinician with a background in health informatics, and decades of experience in hospitals and public sector organisations, with an emphasis on governance, design, development and deployment of digital health strategies and technologies. Before moving into digital health, I had more than 14 years’ experience as a registered nurse, including paediatric and adult intensive care. I am now able to apply my understanding of health systems and practice not just to optimise technology design and rollout, but to act as an effective agent of change, building engagement and momentum around transformational programs.

Q. What are some of the latest projects/developments that you are currently working on at ADHA?

A. The Australian Digital Health Agency is setting out the pathway to achieve our goals in the National Digital Health Strategy, to support the premise that “A workforce confidently using digital health technologies to deliver health and care will be required to address the technology adoption challenge and calls for supporting the workforce to better adapt to, use and embrace the changes and opportunities created by digital health innovation.” A digitally enabled workforce for Australia will benefit consumers, healthcare professionals and the broader health system. In addition, future innovations and approaches to healthcare delivery, such as applied data analytics, and technologies such as machine learning, artificial intelligence (AI) and advanced robotics, will require a shift in the skills mix of the healthcare workforce in order to obtain the greatest benefit of these advances for healthcare consumers.

To support this, the Agency is undertaking a program to consult the health sector and other relevant stakeholders on strategies to address the enablement of the workforce and any perceived gaps. Our aim is to develop a holistic understanding of the potential skills and workforce shortages and develop strategies to address them. This will culminate in the development of a National Digital Health Workforce and Education Roadmap. The roadmap will be a focal point for a National Digital Health Workforce and Education Summit being planned for later in 2019. This event will bring together stakeholders from across the sector to consider the roadmap and agree the practical actions required to deliver the workforce Australia needs.

Q. From your experience both as nurse and in healthcare informatics, what do you feel are the greatest challenges in the journey toward achieving better health outcomes through digital health?

A. Striving to deliver real-time improvements in clinician workflow is the holy grail for me, but I know that we aren’t there yet. That said, l also know that many of my colleagues are deeply invested in this as an outcome, and recognise that to truly deliver on improvements in patient outcomes, we need to improve the way digital tools and technologies work inside healthcare environments. It might keep me awake at night, but I do believe we’ll see real change in the not-so-distant future.

Q. In 2017, you were awarded a Churchill Fellowship to study methods to prevent patient harm through national digital health safety governance. Could you share with us some of your key insights/findings from the study, especially through your visits to the UK, USA and Canada?

A. My Fellowship trip was life-changing and I met so many people who gave their time, their insights and knowledge so generously – Australia can undoubtedly benefit from this wealth of experience. 

I developed a set of recommendations that drew on the overall findings and principles articulated within my Churchill report. I also drew on the premise of the ‘Health Information Technology (HIT) Safety Center’ model developed in the USA. I did this in part as it is the only fully elaborated model supported by an extensive evidence base, the structure of which is informed by learnings beyond the USA borders. The Center was originally recommended by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Report ‘Health IT and Patient Safety: Building Safer Systems for Better Care’, published in 2012, with a subsequent commitment by the Obama administration to establish the roadmap to develop the Center. 

It was further endorsed through the USA Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act (FDASIA) of 2015. While the Center has not been implemented as it was originally envisioned, many of its proposed members are active in the ‘Partnership for Health IT Safety’, a multi-stakeholder collaborative of more than 50 organisations that come together to analyse safety events and hazards, identify, and share solutions and safe practices, and inform policymakers and the broader healthcare community about priorities for health IT safety.

I contend that Australia should assemble a taskforce of experts from across the health sector, to include clinicians, consumers, government, researchers, policy makers and industry to develop the vision, mission, outcomes and roadmap for better coordinated digital health patient safety in Australia. The taskforce’s expressed purpose is to ensure digital health is safer for patients and will build upon the significant progress already made in Australia, and internationally. More information can be obtained here

Q. You will be speaking about how the implementation of Australia’s National Digital Health Strategy is improving patient health outcomes through integration of digital health services at the upcoming HIMSS AsiaPac19 conference in Bangkok. Could you tell us more about the key pillars of the strategy?

A. The key pillars of the Digital Health Strategy include the expansion of My Health Record, supporting secure messaging between clinical software and the development of an interoperable health system. 

More than 90 per cent of Australians now have a My Health Record, 23 million clinical documents and 56 million medication prescription and dispense records have been uploaded, and close to 16,200 healthcare professional organisations are connected (as of 30 June 2019). As part of the expansion of My Health Record, the Agency is working with healthcare providers across the country to connect healthcare professionals to the My Health Record system and improve the information available to consumers who have a My Health Record. As more providers are connected and more information is uploaded, My Health Record will become increasingly useful in ensuring key health information can be viewed securely whenever and wherever it is needed. 

The work we are undertaking to support secure messaging will give clinicians the ability to communicate with other professionals and their patients through secure digital channels and end dependence on paper-based correspondence and the fax machine. New industry standards to share correspondence digitally have been agreed and these are now being implemented.

Through the development of an interoperable health system, we are working to set standards that will allow clinical data to be shared seamlessly and securely, in real time, by care professionals, patients, and citizens, with common understanding and meaning whether they are in or outside hospital. For example, this will give all clinicians and pharmacists access to electronic prescribing and dispensing of medicines, reducing the risk of medication errors for their patients. The Agency is leading a national consultation which will recommend the appropriate data and digital standards for connected healthcare by the end of 2019.

Angela Ryan is a panelist at the opening keynote plenary happening on October 7 at the upcoming HIMSS AsiaPac19 Conference. She will also be giving a keynote titled “Digital Health, Better Health for All Australians” on October 8 during the conference. Early bird rates for conference registration are still ongoing and more details can be found here

Special Report: 
]]>
Implementation best practices: Getting in the revenue cycle http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/implementation-best-practices-getting-revenue-cycle http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/implementation-best-practices-getting-revenue-cycle Thu, 15 Aug 2019 11:58:00 CDT at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com Five experts in revenue cycle management IT offer wide-ranging best practices and advantageous tips for launching the technology at healthcare provider organizations. Most hospitals are behind on finding, responding to threats http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/most-hospitals-are-behind-finding-responding-threats http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/most-hospitals-are-behind-finding-responding-threats Thu, 15 Aug 2019 11:17:55 CDT at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com A new industry survey finds that a lack of network visibility is impairing already overworked cybersecurity teams. FDA partners with Syapse to study regulatory use of real-world evidence http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/fda-partners-syapse-study-regulatory-use-real-world-evidence http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/fda-partners-syapse-study-regulatory-use-real-world-evidence Thu, 15 Aug 2019 10:57:00 CDT at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com The precision medicine company will work with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to see how secure patient data can be better put to work in the development of oncology treatments. FDA partners with Syapse to study regulatory use of real-world evidence http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/fda-partners-syapse-study-regulatory-use-real-world-evidence http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/fda-partners-syapse-study-regulatory-use-real-world-evidence Thu, 15 Aug 2019 10:57:00 CDT mmiliard at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy The U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Oncology Center of Excellence is embarking on a multi-year research partnership with Syapse, the developer of precision medicine technology. The collaboration centers around how to better use of real-world evidence to support regulatory decisions. WHY IT MATTERS Syapse will work with OCE – and other stakeholders across the agency – on regulatory issues around testing and treatment patterns, dosing and safety and oncology outcomes, the company says. Together, Syapse and the FDA will explore new methods to gain RWE data from multiple sources, including electronic health records, molecular data from testing labs, claims and more. They'll focus on the regulatory suitability of RWE derived from such a multi-source approach. In addition, they'll seek real-world endpoints for solid tumors and hematological malignancies, according to Syapse, exploring the clinical impact of molecular testing, seeking to better understand outcomes and adverse events for patients receiving precision medicines relative to clinical trial populations. They'll also look for new ways to incorporate patient-reported outcomes data into RWE sets. THE LARGER TREND Syapse says it will also engage oncologists in its Learning Health Network in joint outcomes research, enabling the use of real-world evidence by oncology care providers to inform care decisions and outcomes research; the company can then incorporate the outcomes derivation methodology into its Learning Health Network capabilities. Other data-sharing networks have also been launched recently with a focus on RWE. Just this week, Mercy Technology Services announced its new nationwide network, developed with SAP, to help healthcare stakeholders make better use of clinical data. The aim is to provide a network where providers can gain information to guide their own clinical and business strategies, and technology developers and regulatory agencies can also gain access to data that will fuel innovation. And earlier this month, Cerner, in collaboration with Duke Clinical Research Institute, launched its new Cerner Learning Health Network, which aims to automate data collection from multiple sources, including electronic health records. The goal: Enable clinicians to more easily and efficiently gain health insights and guide care. ON THE RECORD "Advances in real-world evidence present an opportunity to learn from patients and potentially translate those insights into safer and more effective therapies," said Dr. Sean Khozin, associate director for oncology regulatory science and informatics in the FDA's Oncology Center of Excellence. "Real-world evidence from well-designed studies meeting appropriate data quality standards can help to inform decision-making and provide information regarding the impact of new therapies in real-world patient populations, particularly those not represented in clinical trials," he added. "This is especially critical in precision medicine, where understanding all of the factors that may drive safety and response is both imperative and difficult to capture at scale using traditional clinical trials." "Advancing a deeper understanding of real-world endpoints and analytical methodologies is critical to assuring that all stakeholders can have confidence in the quality of evidence produced and accelerating the use of RWE in regulatory decision-making," said Jonathan Hirsch, founder and president of Syapse. "The network of health systems that Syapse represents offers a unique opportunity to learn from oncology patient journeys and populations not well represented in traditional clinical trials." Twitter: @MikeMiliardHITN Email the writer: mike.miliard@himssmedia.com Healthcare IT News is a publication of HIMSS Media. Special Report: 

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Oncology Center of Excellence is embarking on a multi-year research partnership with Syapse, the developer of precision medicine technology. The collaboration centers around how to better use of real-world evidence to support regulatory decisions.

WHY IT MATTERS
Syapse will work with OCE – and other stakeholders across the agency – on regulatory issues around testing and treatment patterns, dosing and safety and oncology outcomes, the company says.

Together, Syapse and the FDA will explore new methods to gain RWE data from multiple sources, including electronic health records, molecular data from testing labs, claims and more. They'll focus on the regulatory suitability of RWE derived from such a multi-source approach.

In addition, they'll seek real-world endpoints for solid tumors and hematological malignancies, according to Syapse, exploring the clinical impact of molecular testing, seeking to better understand outcomes and adverse events for patients receiving precision medicines relative to clinical trial populations. They'll also look for new ways to incorporate patient-reported outcomes data into RWE sets.

THE LARGER TREND
Syapse says it will also engage oncologists in its Learning Health Network in joint outcomes research, enabling the use of real-world evidence by oncology care providers to inform care decisions and outcomes research; the company can then incorporate the outcomes derivation methodology into its Learning Health Network capabilities.

Other data-sharing networks have also been launched recently with a focus on RWE.

Just this week, Mercy Technology Services announced its new nationwide network, developed with SAP, to help healthcare stakeholders make better use of clinical data. The aim is to provide a network where providers can gain information to guide their own clinical and business strategies, and technology developers and regulatory agencies can also gain access to data that will fuel innovation.

And earlier this month, Cerner, in collaboration with Duke Clinical Research Institute, launched its new Cerner Learning Health Network, which aims to automate data collection from multiple sources, including electronic health records. The goal: Enable clinicians to more easily and efficiently gain health insights and guide care.

ON THE RECORD
"Advances in real-world evidence present an opportunity to learn from patients and potentially translate those insights into safer and more effective therapies," said Dr. Sean Khozin, associate director for oncology regulatory science and informatics in the FDA's Oncology Center of Excellence.

"Real-world evidence from well-designed studies meeting appropriate data quality standards can help to inform decision-making and provide information regarding the impact of new therapies in real-world patient populations, particularly those not represented in clinical trials," he added. "This is especially critical in precision medicine, where understanding all of the factors that may drive safety and response is both imperative and difficult to capture at scale using traditional clinical trials."

"Advancing a deeper understanding of real-world endpoints and analytical methodologies is critical to assuring that all stakeholders can have confidence in the quality of evidence produced and accelerating the use of RWE in regulatory decision-making," said Jonathan Hirsch, founder and president of Syapse. "The network of health systems that Syapse represents offers a unique opportunity to learn from oncology patient journeys and populations not well represented in traditional clinical trials."

Twitter: @MikeMiliardHITN
Email the writer: mike.miliard@himssmedia.com

Healthcare IT News is a publication of HIMSS Media.

Special Report: 
]]>
Trial of tele-ophthalmology system at regional health board in Scotland shows promising results http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/europe/trial-tele-ophthalmology-system-regional-health-board-scotland-shows-promising-results http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/europe/trial-tele-ophthalmology-system-regional-health-board-scotland-shows-promising-results Thu, 15 Aug 2019 09:27:21 CDT at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com NHS Forth Valley was awarded £37,200 by the Scottish government for the project. Leaders of NIH’s All of Us Research Program recap progress and next steps http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/leaders-nihs-all-us-research-program-recap-progress-next-steps http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/leaders-nihs-all-us-research-program-recap-progress-next-steps Wed, 14 Aug 2019 21:00:00 CDT NIH News Release Strong progress has been made in efforts to advance precision medicine ]]> Mercy Technology Services creates nationwide data network with SAP http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/mercy-technology-services-creates-nationwide-data-network-sap http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/mercy-technology-services-creates-nationwide-data-network-sap Wed, 14 Aug 2019 13:07:24 CDT at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com The health system's IT arm says the network, focused on real-world evidence, will help with curated clinical data sharing among providers, pharmaceutical researchers, device manufacturers, policymakers and others. How healthcare CIOs and CISOs can handle identity and access management http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/how-healthcare-cios-and-cisos-can-handle-identity-and-access-management http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/how-healthcare-cios-and-cisos-can-handle-identity-and-access-management Wed, 14 Aug 2019 11:22:00 CDT at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com An expert in the strategies and technologies surrounding identity and access management walks through today’s challenges and discusses how provider organizations can best secure this key area. VA, DOD join forces to streamline healthcare supply chain http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/va-dod-join-forces-streamline-healthcare-supply-chain http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/va-dod-join-forces-streamline-healthcare-supply-chain Wed, 14 Aug 2019 10:15:27 CDT mmiliard at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and the Defense Logistics Agency of the Department of Defense announced a new strategic partnership this week aimed at boosting the VA’s supply chain modernization efforts. WHY IT MATTERS Under the agreement, VA networks nationwide will have expanded access to DLA’s broader supply catalog, enabling greater productivity and efficiency, said government officials. With access to DLA’s worldwide procurement system VA will be able to acquire medical and surgical items, cleaning supplies and equipment and other items needed to support Veterans' health. By combining resources for a centralized ordering system, VA and DOD will also reducing risk, waste, fraud and abuse in medical equipment and supply purchasing. THE LARGER TREND In March, VA’s Captain James A. Lovell Federal Health Care Center became the pilot site for DLA’s Defense Medical Logistics Standard Support commodity ordering system. This is hardly the first healthcare collaboration between the Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs, of course – especially as both organizations work to modernize their respective electronic health record systems. In June, they announced a new office, the Federal Electronic Health Record Modernization office, to improve collaboration on the EHR projects. This was less than a year after DOD and VA told the Senate they would create a single governance point to help manage the massive Cerner implementation. ON THE RECORD "The adoption of a single health care logistics system by VA and DOD highlights the commitment of both organizations to improve military and Veteran health care by increasing the access and quality of care they receive," said VA Secretary Robert Wilkie in a statement. "This is a huge step forward in our efforts to transform VA into a modern, high-performing organization by simplifying operations and leveraging DOD’s supply chain system to support our Veterans." "On behalf of DOD, we are proud to be a value-add to VA on behalf of America’s Veterans," added Lt. Gen. Darrell K. Williams. "Leveraging economies of scale, like the ones outlined in this agreement, help us reduce costs for the military services and other government partners like VA." Twitter: @MikeMiliardHITN Email the writer: mike.miliard@himssmedia.com Healthcare IT News is a publication of HIMSS Media. Special Report: 

The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and the Defense Logistics Agency of the Department of Defense announced a new strategic partnership this week aimed at boosting the VA’s supply chain modernization efforts.

WHY IT MATTERS
Under the agreement, VA networks nationwide will have expanded access to DLA’s broader supply catalog, enabling greater productivity and efficiency, said government officials. With access to DLA’s worldwide procurement system VA will be able to acquire medical and surgical items, cleaning supplies and equipment and other items needed to support Veterans' health.

By combining resources for a centralized ordering system, VA and DOD will also reducing risk, waste, fraud and abuse in medical equipment and supply purchasing.

THE LARGER TREND
In March, VA’s Captain James A. Lovell Federal Health Care Center became the pilot site for DLA’s Defense Medical Logistics Standard Support commodity ordering system.

This is hardly the first healthcare collaboration between the Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs, of course – especially as both organizations work to modernize their respective electronic health record systems. In June, they announced a new office, the Federal Electronic Health Record Modernization office, to improve collaboration on the EHR projects.

This was less than a year after DOD and VA told the Senate they would create a single governance point to help manage the massive Cerner implementation.

ON THE RECORD
"The adoption of a single health care logistics system by VA and DOD highlights the commitment of both organizations to improve military and Veteran health care by increasing the access and quality of care they receive," said VA Secretary Robert Wilkie in a statement. "This is a huge step forward in our efforts to transform VA into a modern, high-performing organization by simplifying operations and leveraging DOD’s supply chain system to support our Veterans."

"On behalf of DOD, we are proud to be a value-add to VA on behalf of America’s Veterans," added Lt. Gen. Darrell K. Williams. "Leveraging economies of scale, like the ones outlined in this agreement, help us reduce costs for the military services and other government partners like VA."

Twitter: @MikeMiliardHITN
Email the writer: mike.miliard@himssmedia.com

Healthcare IT News is a publication of HIMSS Media.

Special Report: 
]]>
Study finds link between long-term exposure to air pollution and emphysema http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/study-finds-link-between-long-term-exposure-air-pollution-emphysema http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/study-finds-link-between-long-term-exposure-air-pollution-emphysema Tue, 13 Aug 2019 18:45:00 CDT NIH News Release Findings might explain why some people who never smoked develop lung disease. ]]> Medical groups want changes to CMS Patients Over Paperwork program http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/medical-groups-want-changes-cms-patients-over-paperwork-program http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/medical-groups-want-changes-cms-patients-over-paperwork-program Tue, 13 Aug 2019 15:40:21 CDT mmiliard at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy The American Medical Group Association and Medical Group Management Association have both weighed in with the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services about CMS' proposed rules on reducing regulatory burden – and both want changes. WHY IT MATTERS For its part, AMGA offered a list of suggestions CMS should take to cut back on Medicare's regulatory complexity and help free up physicians to deliver better care. Among them the group asked the agency to reconsider several policies in the Medicare Shared Savings Program, and waive its Appropriate Use Criteria for providers participating in value-based reimbursement models – but said MSSP waivers should be available to providers at all levels of risk, since different sets of rules would hinder more providers from being ready for the transition into risk-bearing model AMGA also asked CMS to rethink several of its documentation and reporting requirements, especially those that don't improve care delivery or workflow processes. For instance, "current quality reporting continues to be burdensome, contributing to burnout and added costs for providers," the group argued in its letter to CMS Administrator Seema Verma. "Research has indicated that annually U.S. physician practices in four common specialties spend more than $15.4 billion and, on average, 785 hours per physician to report quality measures. "Additionally, our own members have reported the cost and burden associated with measure reporting. For example, a 2017 AMGA survey found that for every 100 physicians our members employ, 17 information technology professionals were needed to support them. These costs are much better spent on caring for patients, not maintaining an expensive IT infrastructure." The Medical Group Management Association, meanwhile made the case that, while it's an improvement over the "problematic sustainable growth rate" and an accompanying "hodgepodge of quality reporting programs," Merit-based Incentive Payment System "remains an overly complex program that rewards the quantity of reporting rather than the quality of care provided to patients." In its letter to CMS, MGMA asked the agency, among other things, to: Decrease the number of measures across MIPS. Simplify MIPS and reduce redundancies by awarding cross-category credit. Provide clear and actionable feedback regarding MIPS performance at least every calendar quarter. Refine the low-volume threshold application to group practices. Release critical MIPS information prior to the start of the performance period. More clearly delineate any changes made mid-year to QPP measure specifications, benchmark files, or other technical documents that may impact current year reporting. THE LARGER TREND When the agency unveiled its Patients Over Paperwork initiative, CMS Administrator Seema Verma said too much needless documentation is adversely impacting physicians' ability to do their jobs: "This is a poor use of their time," she said. "We are not leveraging the value of American clinicians." Since then the stories of physician burnout have continued to proliferate. CMS issued a request for information this past June, seeking ways to improve the program. “In step with the Trump Administration’s Cut the Red Tape initiative to reduce overly burdensome regulations across the federal government, Patients over Paperwork has made great inroads in clearing away needlessly complex, outdated, or duplicative requirements that drain clinicians’ time but contribute little to quality of care or patient health," said Verma. ON THE RECORD "Our members are treating patients through delivery models that hold them accountable for the cost and quality of the care they provide," said Dr. Jerry Penso, AMGA president and CEO. "These models by design do not contain the same misaligned incentives seen in the fee-for-service environment, and Medicare’s rules and policies need to recognize and account for this difference." "CMS’s Patients over Paperwork initiative has been in place since 2017 and the results have been modest. In fact, 86% of MGMA members reported an increase in regulatory burden last year," said Anders Gilberg, senior vice president of government Affairs at MGMA. "There is a tremendous amount the administration can do to reduce the regulatory burden on medical practices. CMS has gathered more than enough feedback from the physician community at this point and should focus on implementation over information." Twitter: @MikeMiliardHITN Email the writer: mike.miliard@himssmedia.com Healthcare IT News is a publication of HIMSS Media. Special Report: 

The American Medical Group Association and Medical Group Management Association have both weighed in with the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services about CMS' proposed rules on reducing regulatory burden – and both want changes.

WHY IT MATTERS
For its part, AMGA offered a list of suggestions CMS should take to cut back on Medicare's regulatory complexity and help free up physicians to deliver better care.

Among them the group asked the agency to reconsider several policies in the Medicare Shared Savings Program, and waive its Appropriate Use Criteria for providers participating in value-based reimbursement models – but said MSSP waivers should be available to providers at all levels of risk, since different sets of rules would hinder more providers from being ready for the transition into risk-bearing model

AMGA also asked CMS to rethink several of its documentation and reporting requirements, especially those that don't improve care delivery or workflow processes.

For instance, "current quality reporting continues to be burdensome, contributing to burnout and added costs for providers," the group argued in its letter to CMS Administrator Seema Verma. "Research has indicated that annually U.S. physician practices in four common specialties spend more than $15.4 billion and, on average, 785 hours per physician to report quality measures.

"Additionally, our own members have reported the cost and burden associated with measure reporting. For example, a 2017 AMGA survey found that for every 100 physicians our members employ, 17 information technology professionals were needed to support them. These costs are much better spent on caring for patients, not maintaining an expensive IT infrastructure."

The Medical Group Management Association, meanwhile made the case that, while it's an improvement over the "problematic sustainable growth rate" and an accompanying "hodgepodge of quality reporting programs," Merit-based Incentive Payment System "remains an overly complex program that rewards the quantity of reporting rather than the quality of care provided to patients."

In its letter to CMS, MGMA asked the agency, among other things, to:

  • Decrease the number of measures across MIPS.
  • Simplify MIPS and reduce redundancies by awarding cross-category credit.
  • Provide clear and actionable feedback regarding MIPS performance at least every calendar quarter.
  • Refine the low-volume threshold application to group practices.
  • Release critical MIPS information prior to the start of the performance period.
  • More clearly delineate any changes made mid-year to QPP measure specifications, benchmark files, or other technical documents that may impact current year reporting.

THE LARGER TREND
When the agency unveiled its Patients Over Paperwork initiative, CMS Administrator Seema Verma said too much needless documentation is adversely impacting physicians' ability to do their jobs: "This is a poor use of their time," she said. "We are not leveraging the value of American clinicians."

Since then the stories of physician burnout have continued to proliferate.

CMS issued a request for information this past June, seeking ways to improve the program.

“In step with the Trump Administration’s Cut the Red Tape initiative to reduce overly burdensome regulations across the federal government, Patients over Paperwork has made great inroads in clearing away needlessly complex, outdated, or duplicative requirements that drain clinicians’ time but contribute little to quality of care or patient health," said Verma.

ON THE RECORD
"Our members are treating patients through delivery models that hold them accountable for the cost and quality of the care they provide," said Dr. Jerry Penso, AMGA president and CEO. "These models by design do not contain the same misaligned incentives seen in the fee-for-service environment, and Medicare’s rules and policies need to recognize and account for this difference."

"CMS’s Patients over Paperwork initiative has been in place since 2017 and the results have been modest. In fact, 86% of MGMA members reported an increase in regulatory burden last year," said Anders Gilberg, senior vice president of government Affairs at MGMA. "There is a tremendous amount the administration can do to reduce the regulatory burden on medical practices. CMS has gathered more than enough feedback from the physician community at this point and should focus on implementation over information."

Twitter: @MikeMiliardHITN
Email the writer: mike.miliard@himssmedia.com

Healthcare IT News is a publication of HIMSS Media.

Special Report: 
]]>
Intensive blood pressure control may slow age-related brain damage http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/intensive-blood-pressure-control-may-slow-age-related-brain-damage http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/intensive-blood-pressure-control-may-slow-age-related-brain-damage Tue, 13 Aug 2019 15:00:00 CDT NIH News Release NIH-funded imaging study shows link between blood pressure and white matter lesions. ]]> Enterovirus antibodies detected in acute flaccid myelitis patients http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/enterovirus-antibodies-detected-acute-flaccid-myelitis-patients http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/enterovirus-antibodies-detected-acute-flaccid-myelitis-patients Tue, 13 Aug 2019 10:00:00 CDT NIH News Release NIH-funded study adds to knowledge about rare condition. ]]> Digital maturity assessments rolled out to all DHBs in NZ http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/asia-pacific/digital-maturity-assessments-rolled-out-all-dhbs-nz http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/asia-pacific/digital-maturity-assessments-rolled-out-all-dhbs-nz Tue, 13 Aug 2019 04:16:39 CDT deankoh at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy Eight more district health boards (DHBs) in New Zealand will be assessed on their digital maturity using HIMSS Analytics maturity assessments over the next 12 months. The Ministry kicked off its digital health maturity model project early this year, with Southern DHB the first to complete the assessments, followed by MidCentral DHB, which is awaiting its report. All DHBs are now being offered the chance to have an assessment using four HIMSS maturity assessments: EMRAM, O-EMRAM, CCMM and INFRAM. Ministry of Health Group Manager of Digital Strategy and Investment Darren Douglass says the intention is that the remaining DHBs will have assessments in 2020/2021. The Ministry and HIMSS are holding a workshop on Nov. 20 during Digital Health Week NZ 2019 in Hamilton for those wanting to learn more about the assessment process. HIMSS Analytics Global Vice President John Daniels says the workshop will focus on how organisations can leverage the HIMSS maturity model road maps to guide their journey toward digital transformation. He has been impressed with the level of engagement from the Ministry and the DHBs HIMSS has worked with so far. “It seems everyone is on the same boat wanting to drive healthcare forward from a digital transformation perspective, and one of the big challenges organisations face is getting everyone working toward a common goal,” he said. The HIMSS assessments score hospitals and care settings on their adoption and use of electronic medical records on a scale from 0–7. At the workshop, Daniels will provide an overview of the maturity models, looking at how and why they were developed, as well as a deeper dive into EMRAM and O-EMRAM. He says the process not only identifies the gaps in maturity, but provides details around those gaps, such as what factors are preventing the organisation from having a certain capability. Daniels hopes the workshop will attract senior IT leaders, clinical leaders and industry partners as the groups need to work together on the transformation journey. “For the most part, I think the culture is there in New Zealand that will enable this sort of transformation to occur, but you need the right leadership and the people using the systems to be on board and everyone working together, as it takes a team effort,” he added. Douglass hopes that people from across the sector will attend the sessions at HINZ 2019 as their organisation may be invited to participate in an assessment. “Undertaking the HIMSS maturity assessments uses an international tool that can assist DHBs in their roadmaps for digital investment. A New Zealand glossary has been developed to ensure the assessment fits the New Zealand health environment,” he said. There will also be a session at the HINZ Conference 2019 regarding the learnings from the assessments that have been completed. This article first appeared on eHealthNews.nz.  Special Report: 

Eight more district health boards (DHBs) in New Zealand will be assessed on their digital maturity using HIMSS Analytics maturity assessments over the next 12 months.

The Ministry kicked off its digital health maturity model project early this year, with Southern DHB the first to complete the assessments, followed by MidCentral DHB, which is awaiting its report.

All DHBs are now being offered the chance to have an assessment using four HIMSS maturity assessments: EMRAM, O-EMRAM, CCMM and INFRAM.

Ministry of Health Group Manager of Digital Strategy and Investment Darren Douglass says the intention is that the remaining DHBs will have assessments in 2020/2021.

The Ministry and HIMSS are holding a workshop on Nov. 20 during Digital Health Week NZ 2019 in Hamilton for those wanting to learn more about the assessment process.

HIMSS Analytics Global Vice President John Daniels says the workshop will focus on how organisations can leverage the HIMSS maturity model road maps to guide their journey toward digital transformation.

He has been impressed with the level of engagement from the Ministry and the DHBs HIMSS has worked with so far.

“It seems everyone is on the same boat wanting to drive healthcare forward from a digital transformation perspective, and one of the big challenges organisations face is getting everyone working toward a common goal,” he said.

The HIMSS assessments score hospitals and care settings on their adoption and use of electronic medical records on a scale from 0–7.

At the workshop, Daniels will provide an overview of the maturity models, looking at how and why they were developed, as well as a deeper dive into EMRAM and O-EMRAM.

He says the process not only identifies the gaps in maturity, but provides details around those gaps, such as what factors are preventing the organisation from having a certain capability.

Daniels hopes the workshop will attract senior IT leaders, clinical leaders and industry partners as the groups need to work together on the transformation journey.

“For the most part, I think the culture is there in New Zealand that will enable this sort of transformation to occur, but you need the right leadership and the people using the systems to be on board and everyone working together, as it takes a team effort,” he added.

Douglass hopes that people from across the sector will attend the sessions at HINZ 2019 as their organisation may be invited to participate in an assessment.

“Undertaking the HIMSS maturity assessments uses an international tool that can assist DHBs in their roadmaps for digital investment. A New Zealand glossary has been developed to ensure the assessment fits the New Zealand health environment,” he said.

There will also be a session at the HINZ Conference 2019 regarding the learnings from the assessments that have been completed.

This article first appeared on eHealthNews.nz. 

Special Report: 
]]>
Smoldering spots in the brain may signal severe MS http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/smoldering-spots-brain-may-signal-severe-ms http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/smoldering-spots-brain-may-signal-severe-ms Mon, 12 Aug 2019 16:30:00 CDT NIH News Release NIH study provides hope for diagnosing and testing effectiveness of new treatments for more disabling forms of multiple sclerosis. ]]> HRSA gives $400M to combat opioids through Integrated Behavioral Health Services http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/hrsa-gives-400m-combat-opioids-through-integrated-behavioral-health-services http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/hrsa-gives-400m-combat-opioids-through-integrated-behavioral-health-services Mon, 12 Aug 2019 14:41:08 CDT mmiliard at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services is awarding nearly $400 million to combat the nation’s opioid crisis as part of its five-point strategy to curb the epidemic. WHY IT MATTERS The investment announced this past week, to be disbursed by the Health Resources and Services Administration, will enable those community health centers, rural providers and academic institutions funded by HRSA to broaden their efforts to offer integrated substance use disorder and mental health services, officials say. The agency notes that the number of patients receiving medication-assisted treatment for opioid addiction at HRSA-funded facilities increased 142 percent from 2016 to 2018. The number receiving buprenorphine, for instance, has increased 28 percent since 2017. THE LARGER TREND Public and private investments are key toward fighting back against the opioid crisis – as illustrated by a program launched in Kentucky this past month, where Kentucky Hospital Association emergency departments gained access to a data sharing tool, made possible by funding from Anthem, to enable better communication and collaboration. Optimization of health technology is another essential. We showed recently how Overlake Medical Center & Clinics in Bellevue, Washington, is customizing its Epic electronic health record to combat the epidemic: tracking when a patient agreement goes into Epic, tools for assessing risk of diversion or addiction, the state provider database and more. HRSA is also awarding some $70 million to fund Opioid Workforce Expansion Programs for both professionals and paraprofessionals, and $17 million to fund awardees at a Graduate Psychology Education Program. Additionally, HRSA’s Federal Office of Rural Health Policy says it is awarding more than $111 million to 96 rural organizations across 37 states as part of its Rural Communities Opioid Response Program initiative.  These funds aim to help bolster those communities' ability prevention, treatment and recovery services and pave the way toward more widespread knowledge of the most effective care interventions. ON THE RECORD "Health centers and behavioral health providers are on the front lines of the fight against the opioid crisis and substance abuse, especially in rural communities," said HHS Secretary Alex Azar in a statement. "With our evidence-based strategy, HHS is working to support local communities in fighting back against substance abuse, and our united efforts are yielding results," he said. "Together, we can end our country’s opioid crisis and lay a foundation for a healthier country where every American can access the mental healthcare they need." Twitter: @MikeMiliardHITN Email the writer: mike.miliard@himssmedia.com Healthcare IT News is a publication of HIMSS Media. Special Report: 

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services is awarding nearly $400 million to combat the nation’s opioid crisis as part of its five-point strategy to curb the epidemic.

WHY IT MATTERS
The investment announced this past week, to be disbursed by the Health Resources and Services Administration, will enable those community health centers, rural providers and academic institutions funded by HRSA to broaden their efforts to offer integrated substance use disorder and mental health services, officials say.

The agency notes that the number of patients receiving medication-assisted treatment for opioid addiction at HRSA-funded facilities increased 142 percent from 2016 to 2018. The number receiving buprenorphine, for instance, has increased 28 percent since 2017.

THE LARGER TREND
Public and private investments are key toward fighting back against the opioid crisis – as illustrated by a program launched in Kentucky this past month, where Kentucky Hospital Association emergency departments gained access to a data sharing tool, made possible by funding from Anthem, to enable better communication and collaboration.

Optimization of health technology is another essential. We showed recently how Overlake Medical Center & Clinics in Bellevue, Washington, is customizing its Epic electronic health record to combat the epidemic: tracking when a patient agreement goes into Epic, tools for assessing risk of diversion or addiction, the state provider database and more.

HRSA is also awarding some $70 million to fund Opioid Workforce Expansion Programs for both professionals and paraprofessionals, and $17 million to fund awardees at a Graduate Psychology Education Program.

Additionally, HRSA’s Federal Office of Rural Health Policy says it is awarding more than $111 million to 96 rural organizations across 37 states as part of its Rural Communities Opioid Response Program initiative. 

These funds aim to help bolster those communities' ability prevention, treatment and recovery services and pave the way toward more widespread knowledge of the most effective care interventions.

ON THE RECORD
"Health centers and behavioral health providers are on the front lines of the fight against the opioid crisis and substance abuse, especially in rural communities," said HHS Secretary Alex Azar in a statement.

"With our evidence-based strategy, HHS is working to support local communities in fighting back against substance abuse, and our united efforts are yielding results," he said. "Together, we can end our country’s opioid crisis and lay a foundation for a healthier country where every American can access the mental healthcare they need."

Twitter: @MikeMiliardHITN
Email the writer: mike.miliard@himssmedia.com

Healthcare IT News is a publication of HIMSS Media.

Special Report: 
]]>
Independent monitoring board recommends early termination of Ebola therapeutics trial in DRC because of favorable results with two of four candidates http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/independent-monitoring-board-recommends-early-termination-ebola-therapeutics-trial-drc-because-favorable-results-two-four-candidates http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/independent-monitoring-board-recommends-early-termination-ebola-therapeutics-trial-drc-because-favorable-results-two-four-candidates Mon, 12 Aug 2019 14:00:00 CDT NIH News Release The study is part of the emergency response to an ongoing Ebola outbreak in the North Kivu and Ituri Provinces. ]]> Field hospital of the future is self-powered, deployable by C-130 aircraft http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/field-hospital-future-self-powered-deployable-c-130-aircraft http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/field-hospital-future-self-powered-deployable-c-130-aircraft Mon, 12 Aug 2019 10:31:56 CDT mmiliard at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy Mobile response unit manufacturer World Housing Solution has taken the wraps off of a prototype military field hospital that is designed to be delivered by a C-130 aircraft and can be up and running in a matter of hours. WHY IT MATTERS Developed to be of potential use to troops stationed at forward operating bases and other remote areas across the globe, the prototype shelter doesn’t require the use of heavy equipment or forklifts, or any special expertise to construct, the company claims. The field hospital can be run off solar panels and batteries and boasts an additional backup generator and provides a sterile environment for treating the wounded. Additional features include the possibility of including pre-op, post-op and intensive care unit beds to provide different levels of care, as well as the option of positive or negative pressure rooms to keep possible contaminants in – or out. The company has deployed a scalable design paradigm that allows the units, which are built from prefabricated panels to serve the needs of a small clinic with a few beds or could be designed with multiple operating rooms and beds to care for dozens of patients. The portable field hospitals are also reusable, according to the company, which noted that it has already demonstrated the units for the Medical Modernization and Planning Office of the Command Surgeon for the U.S. Air Force. THE LARGER TREND As the DoD continues to expand its MHS-Genesis EHR modernization – alongside the other complex imperatives of the Defense Health Agency – the mobile hospital could offer a staging area where medics could access service members' digital health records in the field as they deliver care. As for other battlefield innovations, in May, Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine announced they had each been awarded four-year contracts from the U.S. Department of Defense to create an autonomous trauma care system that would help stabilize forward-deployed soldiers with critical care interventions. The autonomous or nearly autonomous system, TRAuma Care In a Rucksack, is essentially a backpack containing an inflatable vest or perhaps a collapsed stretcher that can treat and stabilize soldiers injured in remote locations. Its overall goal is to treat and stabilize soldiers in the battlefield, even during periods of prolonged field care, when evacuation is not possible. ON THE RECORD Ron Ben-Zeev, founder and CEO of World Housing Solution said that as the nature of warfare continues to evolve, so do the technologies to treat and care for soldiers wounded in combat. "The nature of warfare has changed dramatically over the past few decades, but we’re still treating injured warfighters in tents – a tactic that dates back to the Revolutionary War," said Ben-Zeev in a statement. "Our new solution is designed to deliver a field hospital anywhere in the world that is a comparable setting to what you would find at your local hospital." Nathan Eddy is a healthcare and technology freelancer based in Berlin. Email the writer: nathaneddy@gmail.com Twitter: @dropdeaded209 Special Report: 

Mobile response unit manufacturer World Housing Solution has taken the wraps off of a prototype military field hospital that is designed to be delivered by a C-130 aircraft and can be up and running in a matter of hours.

WHY IT MATTERS
Developed to be of potential use to troops stationed at forward operating bases and other remote areas across the globe, the prototype shelter doesn’t require the use of heavy equipment or forklifts, or any special expertise to construct, the company claims.

The field hospital can be run off solar panels and batteries and boasts an additional backup generator and provides a sterile environment for treating the wounded.

Additional features include the possibility of including pre-op, post-op and intensive care unit beds to provide different levels of care, as well as the option of positive or negative pressure rooms to keep possible contaminants in – or out.

The company has deployed a scalable design paradigm that allows the units, which are built from prefabricated panels to serve the needs of a small clinic with a few beds or could be designed with multiple operating rooms and beds to care for dozens of patients.

The portable field hospitals are also reusable, according to the company, which noted that it has already demonstrated the units for the Medical Modernization and Planning Office of the Command Surgeon for the U.S. Air Force.

THE LARGER TREND
As the DoD continues to expand its MHS-Genesis EHR modernization – alongside the other complex imperatives of the Defense Health Agency – the mobile hospital could offer a staging area where medics could access service members' digital health records in the field as they deliver care.

As for other battlefield innovations, in May, Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine announced they had each been awarded four-year contracts from the U.S. Department of Defense to create an autonomous trauma care system that would help stabilize forward-deployed soldiers with critical care interventions.

The autonomous or nearly autonomous system, TRAuma Care In a Rucksack, is essentially a backpack containing an inflatable vest or perhaps a collapsed stretcher that can treat and stabilize soldiers injured in remote locations. Its overall goal is to treat and stabilize soldiers in the battlefield, even during periods of prolonged field care, when evacuation is not possible.

ON THE RECORD
Ron Ben-Zeev, founder and CEO of World Housing Solution said that as the nature of warfare continues to evolve, so do the technologies to treat and care for soldiers wounded in combat.

"The nature of warfare has changed dramatically over the past few decades, but we’re still treating injured warfighters in tents – a tactic that dates back to the Revolutionary War," said Ben-Zeev in a statement. "Our new solution is designed to deliver a field hospital anywhere in the world that is a comparable setting to what you would find at your local hospital."

Nathan Eddy is a healthcare and technology freelancer based in Berlin.
Email the writer: nathaneddy@gmail.com
Twitter: @dropdeaded209

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NIH-funded study will test seasonal flu vaccines with two experimental adjuvants http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-funded-study-will-test-seasonal-flu-vaccines-two-experimental-adjuvants http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-funded-study-will-test-seasonal-flu-vaccines-two-experimental-adjuvants Thu, 08 Aug 2019 18:00:00 CDT NIH News Release Adjuvants are compounds added to vaccines to induce stronger and longer-lasting immune responses ]]> NIH researchers uncover role of repetitive DNA and protein sequences in tumor evolution http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-researchers-uncover-role-repetitive-dna-protein-sequences-tumor-evolution http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-researchers-uncover-role-repetitive-dna-protein-sequences-tumor-evolution Wed, 07 Aug 2019 19:00:00 CDT NIH News Release Discovery may be useful in cancer diagnosis. ]]> Boris Johnson announces £1.8bn cash boost to upgrade NHS facilities and equipment http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/europe/boris-johnson-announces-18bn-cash-boost-upgrade-nhs-facilities-and-equipment http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/europe/boris-johnson-announces-18bn-cash-boost-upgrade-nhs-facilities-and-equipment Wed, 07 Aug 2019 02:51:21 CDT dyogendra at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy The government announced that 20 hospitals will benefit from £850m (€925m) some of which will go towards digital projects. South Yorkshire and Bassetlaw will use part of its £57.5m (€62.5m) funding towards joining up local services and “therefore improving the use of digital in primary care,” its website states. This will include developing a fully integrated digital service to enable patients to access their health care records and data, support clinical and strategic decision-making and improve system-wide IT services. Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust will receive £12m (€13m) of funding to create a single laboratory information management system across West Yorkshire and Harrogate. The trust said on social media that the funding “reflects collective priorities to embrace new technology, making the most of the expertise and skills of our teams to improve patient care.” Johnson also announced a £1bn (€1.08bn) boost to NHS capital spending to allow existing upgrade programmes to proceed and tackle the most urgent infrastructure projects. WHY IT MATTERS The funding will go towards addressing the £6bn (€6.52bn) maintenance backlog in NHS trusts, of which more than £3bn (€3.3bn) is considered of high or significant risk. NHS England chief executive, Simon Stevens said it was “a significant start to the much-needed capital investment so that our nurses, doctors and other NHS staff will be able to care for their patients in modern facilities with state-of-the-art equipment.” But critics have called the funding inadequate. “Given the scale of underinvestment in NHS buildings, equipment and technology in recent years, this level of funding will only scratch the surface,” said Ben Gershlick, senior economist at the Health Foundation. THE LARGER TREND There have also been doubts cast over how much of the cash is ‘new’. Nuffield Trust senior policy analyst, Sally Gainsbury, tweeted it was partly from savings hospitals had accrued by cutting services, which that are being allowed to spend on capital projects. Chris Hopson, chief executive of NHS Providers, confirmed that some of the funding will come from “cash surpluses currently sitting on provider balance sheets”. ON THE RECORD Richard Murray, chief executive of The King’s Fund, said “a longer-term investment programme is needed to tackle the £6bn (€6.52bn) NHS maintenance backlog, upgrade GP surgeries that are no longer fit for purpose, and modernise the NHS so it can take advantage of new technology.” Danny Mortimer, deputy chief executive of the NHS Confederation and chief executive of NHS Employers, said the money was “desperately needed” to modernise services. “Spending on NHS buildings, equipment and digital technology is half the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development average and woefully inadequate,” he said. Special Report: 

The government announced that 20 hospitals will benefit from £850m (€925m) some of which will go towards digital projects.

South Yorkshire and Bassetlaw will use part of its £57.5m (€62.5m) funding towards joining up local services and “therefore improving the use of digital in primary care,” its website states. This will include developing a fully integrated digital service to enable patients to access their health care records and data, support clinical and strategic decision-making and improve system-wide IT services.

Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust will receive £12m (€13m) of funding to create a single laboratory information management system across West Yorkshire and Harrogate. The trust said on social media that the funding “reflects collective priorities to embrace new technology, making the most of the expertise and skills of our teams to improve patient care.”

Johnson also announced a £1bn (€1.08bn) boost to NHS capital spending to allow existing upgrade programmes to proceed and tackle the most urgent infrastructure projects.

WHY IT MATTERS

The funding will go towards addressing the £6bn (€6.52bn) maintenance backlog in NHS trusts, of which more than £3bn (€3.3bn) is considered of high or significant risk.

NHS England chief executive, Simon Stevens said it was “a significant start to the much-needed capital investment so that our nurses, doctors and other NHS staff will be able to care for their patients in modern facilities with state-of-the-art equipment.”

But critics have called the funding inadequate. Given the scale of underinvestment in NHS buildings, equipment and technology in recent years, this level of funding will only scratch the surface,” said Ben Gershlick, senior economist at the Health Foundation.

THE LARGER TREND

There have also been doubts cast over how much of the cash is ‘new’. Nuffield Trust senior policy analyst, Sally Gainsbury, tweeted it was partly from savings hospitals had accrued by cutting services, which that are being allowed to spend on capital projects.

Chris Hopson, chief executive of NHS Providers, confirmed that some of the funding will come from “cash surpluses currently sitting on provider balance sheets”.

ON THE RECORD

Richard Murray, chief executive of The King’s Fund, said “a longer-term investment programme is needed to tackle the £6bn (€6.52bn) NHS maintenance backlog, upgrade GP surgeries that are no longer fit for purpose, and modernise the NHS so it can take advantage of new technology.”

Danny Mortimer, deputy chief executive of the NHS Confederation and chief executive of NHS Employers, said the money was “desperately needed” to modernise services. “Spending on NHS buildings, equipment and digital technology is half the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development average and woefully inadequate,” he said.

Special Report: 
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EHNAC launches new advisory business for privacy & security compliance http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/ehnac-launches-new-advisory-business-privacy-security-compliance http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/ehnac-launches-new-advisory-business-privacy-security-compliance Tue, 06 Aug 2019 11:17:25 CDT mmiliard at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy The Electronic Healthcare Network Accreditation Commission is launching a new consulting and advisory arm to help healthcare organizations better manage their data and maintain regulatory compliance. WHY IT MATTERS EHNAC, a non-profit standards development organization and accrediting body for healthcare groups that exchange electronic health data, seeks to offer guidance for those organizations as they try to navigate regulatory compliance for data security. It will help with enterprise-wide risk assessments, compliance gaps and third-party assurance requirements among other services, including cybersecurity, HIPAA and HITECH compliance, NIST guidance, standards, and more. EHNAC's areas of expertise include certification, readiness assessments, HITRUST and SOC audits, and other requirements for privacy and security of health data. As it helps its healthcare clients identify compliance gaps, the group says it can help with remediation and instruction on best practices for risk mitigation. THE LARGER TREND All month long at Healthcare IT News, we'll be focusing on the theme of "Securing the Healthcare Environment."  Whether it's ransomware, connected devices, security of cloud infrastructure, data loss protection, phishing, human factors or any other number of complex challenges, IT professionals have come to understand that, as the methods and vectors of cyberattacks evolve, so must their approaches to mitigation.  Too many, however, still think about security in terms of regulatory compliance rather than true information security. HIPAA and HITRUST compliance are merely basic table stakes. As new threats emerge, healthcare organizations need to take an agile and proactive approach to managing the many risks to mission-critical data – the costs are too big to ignore. ON THE RECORD "The increasing number of business, policy drivers and regulatory requirements in our country create pressure for healthcare entities to manage and minimize risk, address compliance requirements and improve health outcomes," Lee Barrett, executive director and CEO of EHNAC, said in a statement. "That’s why we’ve launched our Consulting and Advisory Services, so we can be on the front lines in assisting healthcare stakeholders address those challenges head on," he said, "providing the critical guidance and support needed to be at their very best and retain their competitive edge.” Twitter: @MikeMiliardHITN Email the writer: mike.miliard@himssmedia.com Healthcare IT News is a publication of HIMSS Media. Focus on Securing Healthcare In August, Healthcare IT News, along with our sister sites, MobiHealthNews and Healthcare Finance, will focus on the many ways the industry is succeeding – and the places it's falling short – when it comes to the all-important task of enterprise-wide security. Special Report: 

The Electronic Healthcare Network Accreditation Commission is launching a new consulting and advisory arm to help healthcare organizations better manage their data and maintain regulatory compliance.

WHY IT MATTERS
EHNAC, a non-profit standards development organization and accrediting body for healthcare groups that exchange electronic health data, seeks to offer guidance for those organizations as they try to navigate regulatory compliance for data security.

It will help with enterprise-wide risk assessments, compliance gaps and third-party assurance requirements among other services, including cybersecurity, HIPAA and HITECH compliance, NIST guidance, standards, and more.

EHNAC's areas of expertise include certification, readiness assessments, HITRUST and SOC audits, and other requirements for privacy and security of health data. As it helps its healthcare clients identify compliance gaps, the group says it can help with remediation and instruction on best practices for risk mitigation.

THE LARGER TREND
All month long at Healthcare IT News, we'll be focusing on the theme of "Securing the Healthcare Environment." 

Whether it's ransomware, connected devices, security of cloud infrastructure, data loss protection, phishing, human factors or any other number of complex challenges, IT professionals have come to understand that, as the methods and vectors of cyberattacks evolve, so must their approaches to mitigation. 

Too many, however, still think about security in terms of regulatory compliance rather than true information security. HIPAA and HITRUST compliance are merely basic table stakes. As new threats emerge, healthcare organizations need to take an agile and proactive approach to managing the many risks to mission-critical data – the costs are too big to ignore.

ON THE RECORD
"The increasing number of business, policy drivers and regulatory requirements in our country create pressure for healthcare entities to manage and minimize risk, address compliance requirements and improve health outcomes," Lee Barrett, executive director and CEO of EHNAC, said in a statement.

"That’s why we’ve launched our Consulting and Advisory Services, so we can be on the front lines in assisting healthcare stakeholders address those challenges head on," he said, "providing the critical guidance and support needed to be at their very best and retain their competitive edge.”

Twitter: @MikeMiliardHITN
Email the writer: mike.miliard@himssmedia.com

Healthcare IT News is a publication of HIMSS Media.

Focus on Securing Healthcare

In August, Healthcare IT News, along with our sister sites, MobiHealthNews and Healthcare Finance, will focus on the many ways the industry is succeeding – and the places it's falling short – when it comes to the all-important task of enterprise-wide security.

Special Report: 
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Experimental respiratory syncytial virus vaccine prompts antibody surge http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/experimental-respiratory-syncytial-virus-vaccine-prompts-antibody-surge http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/experimental-respiratory-syncytial-virus-vaccine-prompts-antibody-surge Thu, 01 Aug 2019 19:00:00 CDT NIH News Release Structure-based candidate designed by NIH scientists. ]]> “Wildling” mice could help translate results in animal models to results in humans http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/wildling-mice-could-help-translate-results-animal-models-results-humans http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/wildling-mice-could-help-translate-results-animal-models-results-humans Thu, 01 Aug 2019 18:00:00 CDT NIH News Release NIH researchers create mouse colony to address shortcomings of laboratory mice. ]]> Physicians should think twice about promoting medical credit cards to their patients http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/finance-experts-warn-medical-credit-cards?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/finance-experts-warn-medical-credit-cards?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Tue, 20 Feb 2018 10:15:20 CST Joanne Finnegan at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Consumers use credit cards to pay for everything (including the kitchen sink), and the latest trend has people using medical credit cards to pay for healthcare services. But financial experts are warning practices about the pitfalls of promoting so-called medical credit cards to their patients, says the Healthcare Financial Management Association. Trump administration issues proposed rule to expand short-term insurance plans http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/trump-administration-short-term-insurance-rule?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/trump-administration-short-term-insurance-rule?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Tue, 20 Feb 2018 09:56:31 CST Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare A proposed rule issued by three federal agencies on Tuesday would expand limits for short-term health insurance plans from three months to 12 months. CMS's Seema Verma dismissed concerns that the policy shift would destabilize the individual market by siphoning off healthy individuals, arguing the change will have "virtually no impact" on ACA premiums. Under Trump, HHS rolls back policies aimed at protecting LGBT rights http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/trump-hhs-lgbt-rights-alex-azar?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/trump-hhs-lgbt-rights-alex-azar?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Tue, 20 Feb 2018 09:31:52 CST Leslie Small at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Though President Donald Trump promised to support LGBT causes during the 2016 campaign, under his watch the Department of Health and Human Services had rolled back several initiatives aimed at protecting the rights of that population. New HHS Secretary Alex Azar could take the department in a different direction. Study: Community navigators can reduce the high cost of 'superusers' in hospital settings http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/patient-engagement/community-navigators-superusers-hospital-visits-decrease?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/patient-engagement/community-navigators-superusers-hospital-visits-decrease?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Tue, 20 Feb 2018 09:08:46 CST Paige Minemyer at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare "Superusers," those costly patients who utilize high levels of hospital care, are a significant burden on the healthcare system. But a new study suggests that pairing them with community navigators can reduce their use of hospital services. Researchers in Tennessee found that the intervention reduced their healthcare encounters by 39%. Patients lack information about imaging exams, study finds http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/patients-lack-information-imaging-exams-radiology-study-yale?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/patients-lack-information-imaging-exams-radiology-study-yale?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Sat, 17 Feb 2018 20:14:46 CST Joanne Finnegan at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Doctors can do a better job providing patients with information before they go for an imaging exam, a new study found. One in five patients shows up for an imaging exam without any information about the test they are about to undergo, according to the study published in Radiology. Most for-profit hospitals will benefit from U.S. tax overhaul, but 2 big-name providers stand to gain the most http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/most-for-profit-hospitals-will-benefit-from-us-tax-overhaul-but-two-big-name-providers?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/most-for-profit-hospitals-will-benefit-from-us-tax-overhaul-but-two-big-name-providers?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 16 Feb 2018 15:23:18 CST Ilene MacDonald at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Most for-profit hospitals stand to gain from the changes to the U.S. tax laws, according to a new Moody’s Investors Service report. But HCA Healthcare and Universal Health Service will be the biggest beneficiaries and could see their operating cash flows go up by 10% or more. North Carolina attorney general seeks more details on Atrium Health-UNC Health Care merger  http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/atrium-health-university-north-carolina-merger-ag-wants-details?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/atrium-health-university-north-carolina-merger-ag-wants-details?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 16 Feb 2018 15:12:13 CST Paige Minemyer at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare North Carolina's attorney general is asking Atrium Health and UNC Health Care to provide more information on their merger plans. AG Josh Stein said he intends to ensure that the planned merger doesn't increase patient costs. 5 medical conditions that cost more than $15K per hospital stay http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/5-medical-conditions-cost-more-than-15k-per-hospital-stay?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/5-medical-conditions-cost-more-than-15k-per-hospital-stay?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 16 Feb 2018 14:01:34 CST Ilene MacDonald at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Heart valve disorders lead the list of the most expensive medical conditions with the highest average cost per inpatient stay, according to an analysis by Business Insider based on 2016 data from Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project. Heart valve disorders, on average, cost $41,878 per stay, the analysis found. Anthem alters controversial ER coverage policies http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/anthem-er-coverage-policy-changes?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/anthem-er-coverage-policy-changes?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 16 Feb 2018 11:50:13 CST Leslie Small at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Seeking to address mounting concerns from providers and other stakeholders, Anthem has made changes to policies it previously rolled out that restrict coverage for emergency room visits. The insurer has implemented a series of “always pay” exceptions for certain circumstances, like when the patient received any kind of surgery or an MRI or CT scan. VA head Shulkin to reimburse disputed European travel expenses, but Dems call for hearing over controversy http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/healthcare/va-head-s-european-trip-drama-continues-shulkin-will-reimburse-disputed-expenses-but-won?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/healthcare/va-head-s-european-trip-drama-continues-shulkin-will-reimburse-disputed-expenses-but-won?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 16 Feb 2018 10:30:06 CST Ilene MacDonald at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Veterans Affairs Secretary David Shulkin, M.D., says he will reimburse travel expenses that were the subject of an internal investigation into a trip he took to Europe this summer, but that may not put an end to the controversy. One lawmaker has called for Shulkin’s resignation, and four Democrats have requested a hearing about the trip.