MedClimate Health News Daily http://medclimate.com/feed en-us Copyright MedClimate, Inc2017 Tell us: How has Trump handled healthcare in his first 100 days? http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/tell-us-how-has-trump-handled-healthcare-his-first-100-days http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/tell-us-how-has-trump-handled-healthcare-his-first-100-days Mon, 24 Apr 2017 14:23:13 CDT hpowderly at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy President Donald Trump is nearing the 100-day mark, a benchmark that U.S. presidents have been judged on since President Franklin Delano Roosevelt created a flurry of programs and policy changes in the wake of the Great Depression. For Trump, the milestone is bittersweet, as the president faces low approval ratings. [Also: Surgeon General Vivek Murthy resigns at Trump’s request] But as media, analysts and the public-at-large take inventory of the new president’s performance over the past 100 days, we’d like to know what this audience of healthcare insiders thinks about President Trump’s work on healthcare since he took office in January. While attempts to reform or replace the Affordable Care Act have been hampered by ideological divides, the president was able to install new leadership at those agencies that affect the healthcare sector. Answer the survey below: Loading... Twitter: @HenryPowderly Contact the author: henry.powderly@himssmedia.com Additional Topics: PolicyPolicy

President Donald Trump is nearing the 100-day mark, a benchmark that U.S. presidents have been judged on since President Franklin Delano Roosevelt created a flurry of programs and policy changes in the wake of the Great Depression.

For Trump, the milestone is bittersweet, as the president faces low approval ratings.

[Also: Surgeon General Vivek Murthy resigns at Trump’s request]

But as media, analysts and the public-at-large take inventory of the new president’s performance over the past 100 days, we’d like to know what this audience of healthcare insiders thinks about President Trump’s work on healthcare since he took office in January.

While attempts to reform or replace the Affordable Care Act have been hampered by ideological divides, the president was able to install new leadership at those agencies that affect the healthcare sector.

Answer the survey below:

Loading...

Twitter: @HenryPowderly
Contact the author: henry.powderly@himssmedia.com

Additional Topics: 
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CardioNet slammed with $2.5 million fine for failed risk management and analysis http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/cardionet-slammed-25-million-fine-failed-risk-management-and-analysis http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/cardionet-slammed-25-million-fine-failed-risk-management-and-analysis Mon, 24 Apr 2017 13:50:06 CDT hpowderly at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy Pennsylvania-based wireless health services provider CardioNet has settled with the Department of Health and Human Services for $2.5 million stemming from a 2012 HIPAA violation, the agency announced Monday. The settlement marks the first for a wireless health provider. CardioNet reported to HHS’ Office of Civil Rights in January 2012 that an employee’s laptop was stolen from a parked vehicle outside of the employee’s home. The laptop contained data of 1,391 patients. [Also: Is HIPAA outdated? AHIMA questions whether law is keeping pace with change] The following investigation found CardioNet had insufficient risk analysis and management processes, and its HIPAA Security Rule policies and procedures were in draft form and not implemented. Further, the provider was unable to show final policies and procedures for implementing safeguards for ePHI -- including those found on mobile devices. The size of the settlement demonstrates OCR’s stance on the need for organizations to implement strong, HIPAA-compliant security policies. As part of the settlement, CardioNet will also implement a corrective action plan. “Mobile devices in the healthcare sector remain particularly vulnerable to theft and loss,” OCR Director Roger Severino said in a statement. “Failure to implement mobile device security by Covered Entities and Business Associates puts individuals’ sensitive health information at risk.” “This disregard for security can result in a serious breach, which affects each individual whose information is left unprotected,” he said. Twitter: @JessieFDavis Email the writer: jessica.davis@himssmedia.com Like Healthcare IT News on Facebook and LinkedIn Additional Topics: PolicyMeaningful UsePolicyTechnologySecurityTechnologySecuritySpecific Terms: CompliancePrivacy & SecurityPrivacy & Security

Pennsylvania-based wireless health services provider CardioNet has settled with the Department of Health and Human Services for $2.5 million stemming from a 2012 HIPAA violation, the agency announced Monday. The settlement marks the first for a wireless health provider.

CardioNet reported to HHS’ Office of Civil Rights in January 2012 that an employee’s laptop was stolen from a parked vehicle outside of the employee’s home. The laptop contained data of 1,391 patients.

[Also: Is HIPAA outdated? AHIMA questions whether law is keeping pace with change]

The following investigation found CardioNet had insufficient risk analysis and management processes, and its HIPAA Security Rule policies and procedures were in draft form and not implemented. Further, the provider was unable to show final policies and procedures for implementing safeguards for ePHI -- including those found on mobile devices.

The size of the settlement demonstrates OCR’s stance on the need for organizations to implement strong, HIPAA-compliant security policies. As part of the settlement, CardioNet will also implement a corrective action plan.

“Mobile devices in the healthcare sector remain particularly vulnerable to theft and loss,” OCR Director Roger Severino said in a statement. “Failure to implement mobile device security by Covered Entities and Business Associates puts individuals’ sensitive health information at risk.”

“This disregard for security can result in a serious breach, which affects each individual whose information is left unprotected,” he said.

Twitter: @JessieFDavis
Email the writer: jessica.davis@himssmedia.com


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Wireless cardiac device manufacturer pays $2.5M HIPAA settlement http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/wireless-device-manufacturer-pays-2-5-million-hipaa-settlement http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/wireless-device-manufacturer-pays-2-5-million-hipaa-settlement Mon, 24 Apr 2017 13:48:45 CDT Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: It Wireless cardiac device manufacturer pays $2.5M HIPAA settlement esweeney Mon, 04/24/2017 - 14:48 Wireless cardiac device manufacturer pays $2.5M HIPAA settlement esweeney Mon, 04/24/2017 - 14:48 ]]> Wireless cardiac device manufacturer pays $2.5M HIPAA settlement http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/wireless-device-manufacturer-pays-2-5-million-hipaa-settlement http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/wireless-device-manufacturer-pays-2-5-million-hipaa-settlement Mon, 24 Apr 2017 13:48:45 CDT Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: It Wireless cardiac device manufacturer pays $2.5M HIPAA settlement esweeney Mon, 04/24/2017 - 14:48 Wireless cardiac device manufacturer pays $2.5M HIPAA settlement esweeney Mon, 04/24/2017 - 14:48 ]]> Wireless cardiac device manufacturer pays $2.5M HIPAA settlement http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/wireless-device-manufacturer-pays-2-5-million-hipaa-settlement http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/wireless-device-manufacturer-pays-2-5-million-hipaa-settlement Mon, 24 Apr 2017 13:48:45 CDT Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Wireless cardiac device manufacturer pays $2.5M HIPAA settlement esweeney Mon, 04/24/2017 - 14:48 Wireless cardiac device manufacturer pays $2.5M HIPAA settlement esweeney Mon, 04/24/2017 - 14:48 ]]> HHS cybersecurity center to help healthcare orgs fight cyberthreats http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/hhs-cybersecurity-center-help-healthcare-orgs-fight-cyberthreats http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/hhs-cybersecurity-center-help-healthcare-orgs-fight-cyberthreats Mon, 24 Apr 2017 13:02:29 CDT walmeida at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy The Department of Health and Human Service is planning to launch a National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center by June, HHS Chief Information Security Officer Chris Wlaschin said during an ACT-IAC Mobile Health Forum panel in Washington on April 20. The center will educate healthcare organizations and patients about the risks of using mobile data and apps, according to Federal News Radio. The center will be modeled after the Homeland Security Department’s NCCIC -- but with a focus on healthcare. Initial operating capability should be achieved by June. [Also: The biggest healthcare breaches of 2017 (so far)] “We’ve provided grants to the National Health Information Sharing and Analysis Center to encourage a broad participation,” Wlaschin said.  One that will not just try to reduce the noise but “analyze those and deliver best practices and the two or three things that a small provider, a small office, a doctor in a box can do to protect his patient’s privacy and information security around those systems.” The collaborative partnership is a logical step, as many healthcare organizations lack consistent tools to identify and mitigate cyberthreats, a July Ponemon Institute report found. HHS said the health NCCIC will let the agency collaborate with developers to improve security on patient data. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services is also considering a similar concept. Mark Scrimshire, CMS’ entrepreneur in residence told Federal News Radio. Twitter: @JessieFDavis Email the writer: jessica.davis@himssmedia.com Like Healthcare IT News on Facebook and LinkedIn Additional Topics: PolicyTechnologySecurityTechnologySecuritySpecific Terms: Privacy & SecurityPrivacy & Security

The Department of Health and Human Service is planning to launch a National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center by June, HHS Chief Information Security Officer Chris Wlaschin said during an ACT-IAC Mobile Health Forum panel in Washington on April 20.

The center will educate healthcare organizations and patients about the risks of using mobile data and apps, according to Federal News Radio. The center will be modeled after the Homeland Security Department’s NCCIC -- but with a focus on healthcare.

Initial operating capability should be achieved by June.

[Also: The biggest healthcare breaches of 2017 (so far)]

“We’ve provided grants to the National Health Information Sharing and Analysis Center to encourage a broad participation,” Wlaschin said.  One that will not just try to reduce the noise but “analyze those and deliver best practices and the two or three things that a small provider, a small office, a doctor in a box can do to protect his patient’s privacy and information security around those systems.”

The collaborative partnership is a logical step, as many healthcare organizations lack consistent tools to identify and mitigate cyberthreats, a July Ponemon Institute report found. HHS said the health NCCIC will let the agency collaborate with developers to improve security on patient data.

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services is also considering a similar concept. Mark Scrimshire, CMS’ entrepreneur in residence told Federal News Radio.

Twitter: @JessieFDavis
Email the writer: jessica.davis@himssmedia.com


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AHIMA pushes Congress to fund ONC, continue investing in EHR interoperability http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/ahima-pushes-congress-fund-onc-continue-investing-ehr-interoperability http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/ahima-pushes-congress-fund-onc-continue-investing-ehr-interoperability Mon, 24 Apr 2017 12:31:25 CDT hpowderly at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy The American Health Information Management Association late Friday called on Congress to fund the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT and said not doing so would be a detriment to the bipartisan 21st Century Cures Act. “We urge you to maintain sufficient funding for ONC to meet its statutory obligations under the 21st Century Cures Act,” AHIMA CEO Lynn Thomas Gordon wrote in a letter to Sens. Patty Murray and Roy Blunt, ranking member and chair of the Appropriations Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services, Education and Related Agencies in the U.S. Senate. [Also: The dawn of precision medicine has begun, ONC says] Gordon said that ONC plays a key role in a number of critical areas within health IT. The first is standards development to advance the interoperability of patient data among EHRs, personal health records, medical devices and other healthcare technologies. The second area is in convening all necessary stakeholders to create a Trusted Exchange Framework and the information governance to support that. Gordon also pointed to ONC as a federal partner involved with patient’s rights to access their data under HIPAA and otherwise. “We understand that Congress faces difficult choices in funding a variety of priorities with limited resources. However, failure to adequately fund ONC will undermine a major tenet of the Cures Act,” Gordon wrote. [Also: 21st Century Cures Act a boon to telehealth, experts say] And she cited an analysis of 21st Century Cures by the U.S. House of Representative’s Committee on Energy and Commerce of that tenet: “the delivery of new drugs and devices to the right patient at the right time by ensuring electronic health record systems are interoperable for seamless patient care and . . . [to] fully realize the benefits of a learning healthcare system.” Twitter: SullyHIT Email the writer: tom.sullivan@himssmedia.com Like Healthcare IT News on Facebook and LinkedIn Additional Topics: TechnologyEHRPolicyInteroperabilityTechnologyInteroperabilityTechnologySpecific Terms: Electronic Health Records

The American Health Information Management Association late Friday called on Congress to fund the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT and said not doing so would be a detriment to the bipartisan 21st Century Cures Act.

“We urge you to maintain sufficient funding for ONC to meet its statutory obligations under the 21st Century Cures Act,” AHIMA CEO Lynn Thomas Gordon wrote in a letter to Sens. Patty Murray and Roy Blunt, ranking member and chair of the Appropriations Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services, Education and Related Agencies in the U.S. Senate.

[Also: The dawn of precision medicine has begun, ONC says]

Gordon said that ONC plays a key role in a number of critical areas within health IT.

The first is standards development to advance the interoperability of patient data among EHRs, personal health records, medical devices and other healthcare technologies. The second area is in convening all necessary stakeholders to create a Trusted Exchange Framework and the information governance to support that.

Gordon also pointed to ONC as a federal partner involved with patient’s rights to access their data under HIPAA and otherwise.

“We understand that Congress faces difficult choices in funding a variety of priorities with limited resources. However, failure to adequately fund ONC will undermine a major tenet of the Cures Act,” Gordon wrote.

[Also: 21st Century Cures Act a boon to telehealth, experts say]

And she cited an analysis of 21st Century Cures by the U.S. House of Representative’s Committee on Energy and Commerce of that tenet: “the delivery of new drugs and devices to the right patient at the right time by ensuring electronic health record systems are interoperable for seamless patient care and . . . [to] fully realize the benefits of a learning healthcare system.”

Twitter: SullyHIT
Email the writer: tom.sullivan@himssmedia.com


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Report: Despite progress, telehealth still faces disparate Medicaid policies http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/report-despite-progress-telehealth-still-faces-disparate-medicaid-policies http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/report-despite-progress-telehealth-still-faces-disparate-medicaid-policies Mon, 24 Apr 2017 11:04:30 CDT Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: It Report: Despite progress, telehealth still faces disparate Medicaid policies esweeney Mon, 04/24/2017 - 12:04 Report: Despite progress, telehealth still faces disparate Medicaid policies esweeney Mon, 04/24/2017 - 12:04 ]]> Report: Despite progress, telehealth still faces disparate Medicaid policies http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/report-despite-progress-telehealth-still-faces-disparate-medicaid-policies http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/report-despite-progress-telehealth-still-faces-disparate-medicaid-policies Mon, 24 Apr 2017 11:04:30 CDT Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: It Report: Despite progress, telehealth still faces disparate Medicaid policies esweeney Mon, 04/24/2017 - 12:04 Report: Despite progress, telehealth still faces disparate Medicaid policies esweeney Mon, 04/24/2017 - 12:04 ]]> Report: Despite progress, telehealth still faces disparate Medicaid policies http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/report-despite-progress-telehealth-still-faces-disparate-medicaid-policies http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/report-despite-progress-telehealth-still-faces-disparate-medicaid-policies Mon, 24 Apr 2017 11:04:30 CDT Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Report: Despite progress, telehealth still faces disparate Medicaid policies esweeney Mon, 04/24/2017 - 12:04 Report: Despite progress, telehealth still faces disparate Medicaid policies esweeney Mon, 04/24/2017 - 12:04 ]]> Report: Despite progress, telehealth still faces disparate Medicaid policies http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/report-despite-progress-telehealth-still-faces-disparate-medicaid-policies http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/report-despite-progress-telehealth-still-faces-disparate-medicaid-policies Mon, 24 Apr 2017 11:04:30 CDT Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: Payer Report: Despite progress, telehealth still faces disparate Medicaid policies esweeney Mon, 04/24/2017 - 12:04 Report: Despite progress, telehealth still faces disparate Medicaid policies esweeney Mon, 04/24/2017 - 12:04 ]]> Surgeon General Vivek Murthy resigns at Trump’s request http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/surgeon-general-vivek-murthy-resigns-trumps-request http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/surgeon-general-vivek-murthy-resigns-trumps-request Mon, 24 Apr 2017 10:18:09 CDT walmeida at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy Surgeon General Vivek Murthy, MD, resigned at the Trump administration’s request this weekend and Deputy Surgeon General Rear Adm. Sylvia Trent-Adams stepped in as acting Surgeon General, according to HHS. Prior to her role as deputy, Trent-Adams was chief nurse officer of the U.S. Public Health Services Commissioned Corps, worked in the HIV/AIDS Bureau of the Health Resources and Services Administration, served as a nurse officer in the U.S. Army and was a university research nurse. [Also: Of course VA should replace VistA with Cerner, readers say] Murthy was appointed Surgeon General in 2014 and faced the ongoing opioid and prescription painkiller problem, derided gun violence as a public health issue, cautioned about e-cigarettes, and worked with the Commissioned Corps on Ebola, Zika, and the Flint water crisis. “As my colleague Rear Admiral Sylvia Trent-Adams takes over as Acting Surgeon General, know that our nation is in capable and compassionate hands,” Murthy wrote in a Facebook post Friday night.  Murthy will continue working with the US Public Health Service Commissioned Corps.  Twitter: SullyHIT Email the writer: tom.sullivan@himssmedia.com Like Healthcare IT News on Facebook and LinkedIn Additional Topics: PolicyPolicy

Surgeon General Vivek Murthy, MD, resigned at the Trump administration’s request this weekend and Deputy Surgeon General Rear Adm. Sylvia Trent-Adams stepped in as acting Surgeon General, according to HHS.

Prior to her role as deputy, Trent-Adams was chief nurse officer of the U.S. Public Health Services Commissioned Corps, worked in the HIV/AIDS Bureau of the Health Resources and Services Administration, served as a nurse officer in the U.S. Army and was a university research nurse.

[Also: Of course VA should replace VistA with Cerner, readers say]

Murthy was appointed Surgeon General in 2014 and faced the ongoing opioid and prescription painkiller problem, derided gun violence as a public health issue, cautioned about e-cigarettes, and worked with the Commissioned Corps on Ebola, Zika, and the Flint water crisis.

“As my colleague Rear Admiral Sylvia Trent-Adams takes over as Acting Surgeon General, know that our nation is in capable and compassionate hands,” Murthy wrote in a Facebook post Friday night

Murthy will continue working with the US Public Health Service Commissioned Corps. 

Twitter: SullyHIT
Email the writer: tom.sullivan@himssmedia.com


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At Stanford, algorithms and data fuel precision health http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/analytics/at-stanford-algorithms-and-data-fuel-precision-health http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/analytics/at-stanford-algorithms-and-data-fuel-precision-health Mon, 24 Apr 2017 10:05:57 CDT Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare At Stanford, algorithms and data fuel precision health esweeney Mon, 04/24/2017 - 11:05 At Stanford, algorithms and data fuel precision health esweeney Mon, 04/24/2017 - 11:05 ]]> At Stanford, algorithms and data fuel precision health http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/analytics/at-stanford-algorithms-and-data-fuel-precision-health http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/analytics/at-stanford-algorithms-and-data-fuel-precision-health Mon, 24 Apr 2017 10:05:57 CDT Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: It At Stanford, algorithms and data fuel precision health esweeney Mon, 04/24/2017 - 11:05 At Stanford, algorithms and data fuel precision health esweeney Mon, 04/24/2017 - 11:05 ]]> At Stanford, algorithms and data fuel precision health http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/analytics/at-stanford-algorithms-and-data-fuel-precision-health http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/analytics/at-stanford-algorithms-and-data-fuel-precision-health Mon, 24 Apr 2017 10:05:57 CDT Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: It At Stanford, algorithms and data fuel precision health esweeney Mon, 04/24/2017 - 11:05 At Stanford, algorithms and data fuel precision health esweeney Mon, 04/24/2017 - 11:05 ]]> Study: Team-based primary care improves patient outcomes http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/study-team-based-primary-care-improves-patient-outcomes http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/study-team-based-primary-care-improves-patient-outcomes Mon, 24 Apr 2017 09:26:29 CDT Paige Minemyer at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Study: Team-based primary care improves patient outcomes pminemyer Mon, 04/24/2017 - 10:26 Study: Team-based primary care improves patient outcomes pminemyer Mon, 04/24/2017 - 10:26 ]]> Trump White House dismisses vaccine champion Surgeon General Vivek H. Murthy http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/healthcare/trump-replaces-surgeon-general-vivek-h-murthy-opioid-addiction-guns-vaccines http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/healthcare/trump-replaces-surgeon-general-vivek-h-murthy-opioid-addiction-guns-vaccines Mon, 24 Apr 2017 09:24:19 CDT Gienna Shaw at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Trump White House dismisses vaccine champion Surgeon General Vivek H. Murthy gshaw Mon, 04/24/2017 - 10:24 Trump White House dismisses vaccine champion Surgeon General Vivek H. Murthy gshaw Mon, 04/24/2017 - 10:24 ]]> Healthcare in America: An employment bonanza and a runaway-cost crisis http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/healthcare/healthcare-america-employment-bonanza-and-a-runaway-cost-crisis http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/healthcare/healthcare-america-employment-bonanza-and-a-runaway-cost-crisis Mon, 24 Apr 2017 09:12:45 CDT Chad Terhune at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Healthcare in America: An employment bonanza and a runaway-cost crisis imacdonald Mon, 04/24/2017 - 10:12 Healthcare in America: An employment bonanza and a runaway-cost crisis imacdonald Mon, 04/24/2017 - 10:12 ]]> Accessibility concerns undercut technology’s promise to improve chronic conditions http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/mobile/accessibility-concerns-battle-tech-s-promise-to-improve-chronic-conditions http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/mobile/accessibility-concerns-battle-tech-s-promise-to-improve-chronic-conditions Mon, 24 Apr 2017 08:58:56 CDT Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: Payer Accessibility concerns undercut technology’s promise to improve chronic conditions esweeney Mon, 04/24/2017 - 09:58 Accessibility concerns undercut technology’s promise to improve chronic conditions esweeney Mon, 04/24/2017 - 09:58 ]]> Accessibility concerns undercut technology’s promise to improve chronic conditions http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/mobile/accessibility-concerns-battle-tech-s-promise-to-improve-chronic-conditions http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/mobile/accessibility-concerns-battle-tech-s-promise-to-improve-chronic-conditions Mon, 24 Apr 2017 08:58:56 CDT Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Accessibility concerns undercut technology’s promise to improve chronic conditions esweeney Mon, 04/24/2017 - 09:58 Accessibility concerns undercut technology’s promise to improve chronic conditions esweeney Mon, 04/24/2017 - 09:58 ]]> Accessibility concerns undercut technology’s promise to improve chronic conditions http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/mobile/accessibility-concerns-battle-tech-s-promise-to-improve-chronic-conditions http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/mobile/accessibility-concerns-battle-tech-s-promise-to-improve-chronic-conditions Mon, 24 Apr 2017 08:58:56 CDT Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: It Accessibility concerns undercut technology’s promise to improve chronic conditions esweeney Mon, 04/24/2017 - 09:58 Accessibility concerns undercut technology’s promise to improve chronic conditions esweeney Mon, 04/24/2017 - 09:58 ]]> Accessibility concerns undercut technology’s promise to improve chronic conditions http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/mobile/accessibility-concerns-battle-tech-s-promise-to-improve-chronic-conditions http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/mobile/accessibility-concerns-battle-tech-s-promise-to-improve-chronic-conditions Mon, 24 Apr 2017 08:58:56 CDT Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: It Accessibility concerns undercut technology’s promise to improve chronic conditions esweeney Mon, 04/24/2017 - 09:58 Accessibility concerns undercut technology’s promise to improve chronic conditions esweeney Mon, 04/24/2017 - 09:58 ]]> NIH Funds Seven International Centers of Excellence for Malaria Research http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-funds-seven-international-centers-excellence-malaria-research http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-funds-seven-international-centers-excellence-malaria-research Fri, 21 Apr 2017 17:00:00 CDT NIH News Release The awards fund three new and four existing centers that work in 14 countries in Africa, Asia and Latin America. ]]> AHIMA raises concerns about ONC funding http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/ahima-raises-concerns-about-onc-funding http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/ahima-raises-concerns-about-onc-funding Fri, 21 Apr 2017 15:27:02 CDT Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: It AHIMA raises concerns about ONC funding esweeney Fri, 04/21/2017 - 16:27 AHIMA raises concerns about ONC funding esweeney Fri, 04/21/2017 - 16:27 ]]> AHIMA raises concerns about ONC funding http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/ahima-raises-concerns-about-onc-funding http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/ahima-raises-concerns-about-onc-funding Fri, 21 Apr 2017 15:27:02 CDT Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: It AHIMA raises concerns about ONC funding esweeney Fri, 04/21/2017 - 16:27 AHIMA raises concerns about ONC funding esweeney Fri, 04/21/2017 - 16:27 ]]> AHIMA raises concerns about ONC funding http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/ahima-raises-concerns-about-onc-funding http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/ahima-raises-concerns-about-onc-funding Fri, 21 Apr 2017 15:27:02 CDT Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare AHIMA raises concerns about ONC funding esweeney Fri, 04/21/2017 - 16:27 AHIMA raises concerns about ONC funding esweeney Fri, 04/21/2017 - 16:27 ]]> 21 California doctors charged in $40M fraud scheme http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/21-california-doctors-charged-40-million-kickback-scheme http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/21-california-doctors-charged-40-million-kickback-scheme Fri, 21 Apr 2017 14:59:40 CDT Joanne Finnegan at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare 21 California doctors charged in $40M fraud scheme jfinnegan Fri, 04/21/2017 - 15:59 21 California doctors charged in $40M fraud scheme jfinnegan Fri, 04/21/2017 - 15:59 ]]> 21 California doctors charged in $40M fraud scheme http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/21-california-doctors-charged-40-million-kickback-scheme http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/21-california-doctors-charged-40-million-kickback-scheme Fri, 21 Apr 2017 14:59:40 CDT Joanne Finnegan at FierceHealthcare: Payer 21 California doctors charged in $40M fraud scheme jfinnegan Fri, 04/21/2017 - 15:59 21 California doctors charged in $40M fraud scheme jfinnegan Fri, 04/21/2017 - 15:59 ]]> Of course VA should replace VistA with Cerner, readers say http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/course-va-should-replace-vista-cerner-readers-say http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/course-va-should-replace-vista-cerner-readers-say Fri, 21 Apr 2017 14:46:45 CDT walmeida at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy When it comes to whether the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs should replace its VistA EHR with a commercial product, our readers we nearly unanimous in their support, with the bulk of them picking Cerner over other top-shelf vendors. In a recent Healthcare IT News poll, about 51 percent of readers said Cerner should be the VA’s choice, which aligns with a recent Black Book report that said the same thing. But while 27 percent of readers said Epic would be the best choice, there’s no clear forerunner behind Cerner. VA Secretary David Shulkin, MD, announced in March that the agency will determine the future of its outdated VistA system by July. [Also: VA picks two vendors to standardize agency’s clinical decision support] Shulkin is a vocal proponent for ditching the platform and moving to a commercial EHR. And former CIO LaVerne Council has echoed those sentiments about the failed iEHR project VA and the U.S. Department of Defense attempted. The failure led to DoD replacing its homegrown EHR AHLTA with an initial $4 billion contract to Cerner, Accenture and Leidos. “From my understanding, there is currently limited interoperability with DoD system. If an EHR designed by Cerner would allow seamlessness between the two -- why not?” one reader said. The overwhelming number of respondents point to the need for the VA to focus on delivering care -- instead of attempting to develop and maintain an EHR system. One reader said the VA needs to “stop reinventing the wheel.” [Also: VA finally gets transparent on veteran wait times, clinical care quality] But what are the alternatives and benefits to keeping Vista? Some readers lean toward hiring outside help to outsource development and support, while others think VistA needs optimization of its interface. These options would save the VA a substantial amount of money. The VA should “hire seasoned architects and engineers with EMR experience to update it from the ground up,” one reader said. “Technical documentation writers could document every aspect of the system for continued support and maintenance.” Other readers suggested VistA should remain in place, while the VA can install other programs to support the system. For example, a commercial health interoperability and HIE platform will create a longitudinal record that spans over all VistA sites, while connecting with DoD and other commercial partners. “Even if the decision is made to replace VistA,” one reader suggested, “this platform would still be very applicable for data sharing and for industrial strength plumbing to fulfill the VA's Digital Health Platform strategy.” No matter the result of the July decision, it’s clear all are in agreement that change is imminent and necessary to fix a flawed system that could better serve veterans. Twitter: @JessieFDavis Email the writer: jessica.davis@himssmedia.com Like Healthcare IT News on Facebook and LinkedIn Additional Topics: TechnologyEHRPolicyInteroperabilityTechnologyTechnologyEHRSpecific Terms: Electronic Health RecordsElectronic Health Records

When it comes to whether the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs should replace its VistA EHR with a commercial product, our readers we nearly unanimous in their support, with the bulk of them picking Cerner over other top-shelf vendors.

In a recent Healthcare IT News poll, about 51 percent of readers said Cerner should be the VA’s choice, which aligns with a recent Black Book report that said the same thing. But while 27 percent of readers said Epic would be the best choice, there’s no clear forerunner behind Cerner.

VA Secretary David Shulkin, MD, announced in March that the agency will determine the future of its outdated VistA system by July.

[Also: VA picks two vendors to standardize agency’s clinical decision support]

Shulkin is a vocal proponent for ditching the platform and moving to a commercial EHR. And former CIO LaVerne Council has echoed those sentiments about the failed iEHR project VA and the U.S. Department of Defense attempted. The failure led to DoD replacing its homegrown EHR AHLTA with an initial $4 billion contract to Cerner, Accenture and Leidos.

“From my understanding, there is currently limited interoperability with DoD system. If an EHR designed by Cerner would allow seamlessness between the two -- why not?” one reader said.

The overwhelming number of respondents point to the need for the VA to focus on delivering care -- instead of attempting to develop and maintain an EHR system. One reader said the VA needs to “stop reinventing the wheel.”

[Also: VA finally gets transparent on veteran wait times, clinical care quality]

But what are the alternatives and benefits to keeping Vista?

Some readers lean toward hiring outside help to outsource development and support, while others think VistA needs optimization of its interface. These options would save the VA a substantial amount of money.

The VA should “hire seasoned architects and engineers with EMR experience to update it from the ground up,” one reader said. “Technical documentation writers could document every aspect of the system for continued support and maintenance.”

Other readers suggested VistA should remain in place, while the VA can install other programs to support the system. For example, a commercial health interoperability and HIE platform will create a longitudinal record that spans over all VistA sites, while connecting with DoD and other commercial partners.

“Even if the decision is made to replace VistA,” one reader suggested, “this platform would still be very applicable for data sharing and for industrial strength plumbing to fulfill the VA's Digital Health Platform strategy.”

No matter the result of the July decision, it’s clear all are in agreement that change is imminent and necessary to fix a flawed system that could better serve veterans.

Twitter: @JessieFDavis
Email the writer: jessica.davis@himssmedia.com


Like Healthcare IT News on Facebook and LinkedIn

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Disparate global health spending on the horizon, study says http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/disparate-global-health-spending-horizon-study-says http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/disparate-global-health-spending-horizon-study-says Fri, 21 Apr 2017 14:08:49 CDT Paige Minemyer at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Disparate global health spending on the horizon, study says pminemyer Fri, 04/21/2017 - 15:08 Disparate global health spending on the horizon, study says pminemyer Fri, 04/21/2017 - 15:08 ]]> Provider hit with $31,000 HIPAA settlement over lack of business associate's agreement http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/provider-hit-31000-hipaa-settlement-over-lack-business-associates-agreement http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/provider-hit-31000-hipaa-settlement-over-lack-business-associates-agreement Fri, 21 Apr 2017 13:09:32 CDT walmeida at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy The failure of one Illinois specialist to procure a business associate's agreement has cost it more than $30,000 in a settlement with The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services The Center for Children’s Digestive Health, a small, for-profit pediatric subspecialty practice that operates seven clinic locations in the Chicago area, had contracted in 2003 with FileFax, a Northbrook, Illinois-based firm that stores medical records. Despite the fact that the files contain protected health information, an investigation from HHS' Office for Civil Rights discovered that neither party could show a signed business associate agreement prior to Oct. 12, 2015. In May of 2015, the Illinois Attorney General brought suit against FileFax for improper handling of PHI, charging that its employees had tossed the paper medical records of thousands of patients into an unlocked dumpster. That summer, during a compliance review of Center for Children’s Digestive Health, OCR found that CCDH had "failed to obtain satisfactory assurances from Filefax, in the form of a written business associate agreement, that Filefax would appropriately safeguard the PHI" that was in the company's possession. [Also: CIO: Managing business associates, 3rd-party privacy risk isn't so easy] Despite not having a BAA in place, the provider shared the records of at least 10,728 people, according to OCR. To settle the charge, the provider will pay HHS $31,000 and enter into a corrective action plan to develop policies and procedures in compliance with federal privacy and security standards, educate its staff about proper handling of PHI and provide HHS a list of all of its business associates, with a signed BAA for each. Twitter: @MikeMiliardHITN Email the writer: mike.miliard@himssmedia.com Like Healthcare IT News on Facebook and LinkedIn Additional Topics: PolicyMeaningful UseDataData ManagementPolicyTechnologySecurityWorkforceLeadershipTechnologySecuritySpecific Terms: ComplianceData WarehousingPrivacy & SecurityPrivacy & Security

The failure of one Illinois specialist to procure a business associate's agreement has cost it more than $30,000 in a settlement with The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

The Center for Children’s Digestive Health, a small, for-profit pediatric subspecialty practice that operates seven clinic locations in the Chicago area, had contracted in 2003 with FileFax, a Northbrook, Illinois-based firm that stores medical records.

Despite the fact that the files contain protected health information, an investigation from HHS' Office for Civil Rights discovered that neither party could show a signed business associate agreement prior to Oct. 12, 2015.

In May of 2015, the Illinois Attorney General brought suit against FileFax for improper handling of PHI, charging that its employees had tossed the paper medical records of thousands of patients into an unlocked dumpster.

That summer, during a compliance review of Center for Children’s Digestive Health, OCR found that CCDH had "failed to obtain satisfactory assurances from Filefax, in the form of a written business associate agreement, that Filefax would appropriately safeguard the PHI" that was in the company's possession.

[Also: CIO: Managing business associates, 3rd-party privacy risk isn't so easy]

Despite not having a BAA in place, the provider shared the records of at least 10,728 people, according to OCR.

To settle the charge, the provider will pay HHS $31,000 and enter into a corrective action plan to develop policies and procedures in compliance with federal privacy and security standards, educate its staff about proper handling of PHI and provide HHS a list of all of its business associates, with a signed BAA for each.

Twitter: @MikeMiliardHITN
Email the writer: mike.miliard@himssmedia.com


Like Healthcare IT News on Facebook and LinkedIn

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AHRQ floats $1.5 million in health IT research funding http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/ahrq-floats-15-million-health-it-research-funding http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/ahrq-floats-15-million-health-it-research-funding Fri, 21 Apr 2017 13:05:42 CDT mmiliard at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality is soliciting grant applications for two new health IT research initiatives, totaling potentially $1.5 million in funding. One aims to find successful strategies for the collection and use of patient-reported outcome measures. The other is focused on new ways information technology can improve healthcare quality. For the first, which could last as long three years, funded at $400,000 each for a total of $1.2 million, will explore patient-reported outcomes in primary care and other outpatient settings. [Also: Analytics, big data draw largest shares of $2 billion digital health funding, Rock Health says] PROs offer "a complementary perspective to that of clinician assessments, and may provide greater insights into health status, function, symptom burden, adherence, health behaviors, and quality of life," according to AHRQ. But most EHR systems today don't collect PRO data in structured or standardized ways that could enable broad and comprehensive clinical or health outcomes measurement, and that information isn't routinely available for clinical care, research or quality improvement initiatives. [Also: HRSA awards $16 million to expand telehealth, other rural healthcare services] Especially with the rise of consumer-oriented and wearable technologies, AHRQ is interested in studies that develop new health IT strategies for implementing existing PRO measures in ambulatory care environments, especially those supporting the care of people with multiple chronic conditions. In the second project, which could be funded for a total of $300,000, AHRQ is looking for grant applications to conduct exploratory projects to further contribute to the evidence base of how health IT can improve care quality and patient outcomes by enabling more effective population health management and patient-centered care coordination. "The United States has invested heavily in the widespread adoption and use of health-related products and data systems that capture information to serve personal, clinical, research, and financial purposes," according to the agency. "The next critical step is maximizing this investment by gathering evidence on how best to utilize health IT to generate, integrate, and synthesize disparate electronic data and evidence to support systems and processes that continuously improve patient outcomes." The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality is soliciting grant applications for two new health IT research initiatives, totaling potentially $1.5 million in funding. One aims to find successful strategies for the collection and use of patient-reported outcome measures. The other is focused on new ways information technology can improve healthcare quality. Twitter: @MikeMiliardHITN Email the writer: mike.miliard@himssmedia.com Like Healthcare IT News on Facebook and LinkedIn Additional Topics: PolicyTechnologyEngagementQuality & SafetyTechnologyPolicySpecific Terms: Patient Engagement

The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality is soliciting grant applications for two new health IT research initiatives, totaling potentially $1.5 million in funding.

One aims to find successful strategies for the collection and use of patient-reported outcome measures. The other is focused on new ways information technology can improve healthcare quality.

For the first, which could last as long three years, funded at $400,000 each for a total of $1.2 million, will explore patient-reported outcomes in primary care and other outpatient settings.

[Also: Analytics, big data draw largest shares of $2 billion digital health funding, Rock Health says]

PROs offer "a complementary perspective to that of clinician assessments, and may provide greater insights into health status, function, symptom burden, adherence, health behaviors, and quality of life," according to AHRQ.

But most EHR systems today don't collect PRO data in structured or standardized ways that could enable broad and comprehensive clinical or health outcomes measurement, and that information isn't routinely available for clinical care, research or quality improvement initiatives.

[Also: HRSA awards $16 million to expand telehealth, other rural healthcare services]

Especially with the rise of consumer-oriented and wearable technologies, AHRQ is interested in studies that develop new health IT strategies for implementing existing PRO measures in ambulatory care environments, especially those supporting the care of people with multiple chronic conditions.

In the second project, which could be funded for a total of $300,000, AHRQ is looking for grant applications to conduct exploratory projects to further contribute to the evidence base of how health IT can improve care quality and patient outcomes by enabling more effective population health management and patient-centered care coordination.

"The United States has invested heavily in the widespread adoption and use of health-related products and data systems that capture information to serve personal, clinical, research, and financial purposes," according to the agency. "The next critical step is maximizing this investment by gathering evidence on how best to utilize health IT to generate, integrate, and synthesize disparate electronic data and evidence to support systems and processes that continuously improve patient outcomes."

The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality is soliciting grant applications for two new health IT research initiatives, totaling potentially $1.5 million in funding.

One aims to find successful strategies for the collection and use of patient-reported outcome measures. The other is focused on new ways information technology can improve healthcare quality.

Twitter: @MikeMiliardHITN
Email the writer: mike.miliard@himssmedia.com


Like Healthcare IT News on Facebook and LinkedIn

Specific Terms: 
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Displaying Medicare price data in EHRs won’t reduce unnecessary tests http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/ehr/displaying-price-data-ehrs-won-t-reduce-unnecessary-tests http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/ehr/displaying-price-data-ehrs-won-t-reduce-unnecessary-tests Fri, 21 Apr 2017 10:43:11 CDT Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: It Displaying Medicare price data in EHRs won’t reduce unnecessary tests esweeney Fri, 04/21/2017 - 11:43 Displaying Medicare price data in EHRs won’t reduce unnecessary tests esweeney Fri, 04/21/2017 - 11:43 ]]> Displaying Medicare price data in EHRs won’t reduce unnecessary tests http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/ehr/displaying-price-data-ehrs-won-t-reduce-unnecessary-tests http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/ehr/displaying-price-data-ehrs-won-t-reduce-unnecessary-tests Fri, 21 Apr 2017 10:43:11 CDT Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: Payer Displaying Medicare price data in EHRs won’t reduce unnecessary tests esweeney Fri, 04/21/2017 - 11:43 Displaying Medicare price data in EHRs won’t reduce unnecessary tests esweeney Fri, 04/21/2017 - 11:43 ]]> Displaying Medicare price data in EHRs won’t reduce unnecessary tests http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/ehr/displaying-price-data-ehrs-won-t-reduce-unnecessary-tests http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/ehr/displaying-price-data-ehrs-won-t-reduce-unnecessary-tests Fri, 21 Apr 2017 10:43:11 CDT Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Displaying Medicare price data in EHRs won’t reduce unnecessary tests esweeney Fri, 04/21/2017 - 11:43 Displaying Medicare price data in EHRs won’t reduce unnecessary tests esweeney Fri, 04/21/2017 - 11:43 ]]> Displaying Medicare price data in EHRs won’t reduce unnecessary tests http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/ehr/displaying-price-data-ehrs-won-t-reduce-unnecessary-tests http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/ehr/displaying-price-data-ehrs-won-t-reduce-unnecessary-tests Fri, 21 Apr 2017 10:43:11 CDT Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: It Displaying Medicare price data in EHRs won’t reduce unnecessary tests esweeney Fri, 04/21/2017 - 11:43 Displaying Medicare price data in EHRs won’t reduce unnecessary tests esweeney Fri, 04/21/2017 - 11:43 ]]> With first 100 days almost up, Trump prods GOP to pass revised healthcare bill http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/aca/trump-puts-pressure-gop-to-pass-healthcare-bill http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/aca/trump-puts-pressure-gop-to-pass-healthcare-bill Fri, 21 Apr 2017 10:26:09 CDT Paige Minemyer at FierceHealthcare: Payer With first 100 days almost up, Trump prods GOP to pass revised healthcare bill pminemyer Fri, 04/21/2017 - 11:26 With first 100 days almost up, Trump prods GOP to pass revised healthcare bill pminemyer Fri, 04/21/2017 - 11:26 ]]> Telemedicine: How to handle seamy virtual visitors http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/it-s-internet-patients-flash-doctors-inappropriate-pictures-via-telemedicine http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/it-s-internet-patients-flash-doctors-inappropriate-pictures-via-telemedicine Fri, 21 Apr 2017 10:03:00 CDT Joanne Finnegan at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Telemedicine: How to handle seamy virtual visitors jfinnegan Fri, 04/21/2017 - 11:03 Telemedicine: How to handle seamy virtual visitors jfinnegan Fri, 04/21/2017 - 11:03 ]]> Telemedicine: How to handle seamy virtual visitors http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/it-s-internet-patients-flash-doctors-inappropriate-pictures-via-telemedicine http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/it-s-internet-patients-flash-doctors-inappropriate-pictures-via-telemedicine Fri, 21 Apr 2017 10:03:00 CDT Joanne Finnegan at FierceHealthcare: It Telemedicine: How to handle seamy virtual visitors jfinnegan Fri, 04/21/2017 - 11:03 Telemedicine: How to handle seamy virtual visitors jfinnegan Fri, 04/21/2017 - 11:03 ]]> Telemedicine: How to handle seamy virtual visitors http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/it-s-internet-patients-flash-doctors-inappropriate-pictures-via-telemedicine http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/it-s-internet-patients-flash-doctors-inappropriate-pictures-via-telemedicine Fri, 21 Apr 2017 10:03:00 CDT Joanne Finnegan at FierceHealthcare: It Telemedicine: How to handle seamy virtual visitors jfinnegan Fri, 04/21/2017 - 11:03 Telemedicine: How to handle seamy virtual visitors jfinnegan Fri, 04/21/2017 - 11:03 ]]>