MedClimate Health News Daily http://medclimate.com/feed en-us Copyright MedClimate, Inc2018 Colorado proposes requiring data breaches to be reported in 30 days http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/colorado-proposes-requiring-data-breaches-be-reported-30-days http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/colorado-proposes-requiring-data-breaches-be-reported-30-days Mon, 19 Feb 2018 10:45:05 CST walmeida at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy The Colorado legislature is considering a bill to drastically improve the state’s privacy and data security law, including giving organizations just 30 days to report a breach. Introduced in January, the amended bill passed unanimously in the House Committee on State, Veterans and Military Affairs on Feb. 14. The proposed bill overlaps between HIPAA and state privacy laws, as legislators added medical information and health insurance identification numbers to the types of personal information covered by the bill. This includes the timeframe. [Also: North Carolina proposes law requiring data breaches to be reported in 15 days] Current Colorado privacy laws state organizations must report without “reasonable delay,” while HIPAA regulation requires healthcare organizations report breaches within 60 days after a breach is discovered. The proposed rule creates a 30-day breach notification rule, from the time the organization determines “there is sufficient evidence to conclude that a security breach has taken place." And “in the case of a conflict between the time period for notice to individuals [under Colorado law or federal regulation or law], the law or regulation with the shortest time frame for notice to the individual controls," according to the amended bill. [Also: Iowa legislature proposes requiring orgs to report breaches within 45 days] Also noteworthy, the bill’s language regarding personal information extends further than HIPAA language to include passwords, passcodes and the like, so providers will need to make sure they are compliant with the state’s statute. The legislation has been referred to the Committee on Appropriations for consideration. If the bill passes, Colorado would join Florida as the toughest states on breach notification timelines. [Also: Proposed Senate bill would fine, jail execs who conceal data breaches] Florida also has a 30-day notification rule, but allows an additional 15 days if there’s a “good cause for the delay.” States have been steadily proposing modifications to privacy laws, given the increase in cyberattacks. For example, North Carolina is currently considering legislation to give organizations just 15 days from time of discovery to report a breach. Twitter: @JessieFDavis Email the writer: jessica.davis@himssmedia.com Primary Topic: PolicyAdditional Topics: PolicyTechnologySecurityTechnologySecuritySpecific Terms: Privacy & SecurityPrivacy & SecurityCustom Tags: Privacy & SecurityPrivacy & SecurityDisable Auto Tagging: Short Headline: Colorado proposes requiring data breaches to be reported in 30 daysNewsletter hed: Colorado proposes requiring data breaches to be reported in 30 daysNewsletter teaser: The amended bill that would cut breach reporting time in half for healthcare providers, unanimously passed a State House committee meeting last week.HOT @HIMSS: 

The Colorado legislature is considering a bill to drastically improve the state’s privacy and data security law, including giving organizations just 30 days to report a breach.

Introduced in January, the amended bill passed unanimously in the House Committee on State, Veterans and Military Affairs on Feb. 14.

The proposed bill overlaps between HIPAA and state privacy laws, as legislators added medical information and health insurance identification numbers to the types of personal information covered by the bill. This includes the timeframe.

[Also: North Carolina proposes law requiring data breaches to be reported in 15 days]

Current Colorado privacy laws state organizations must report without “reasonable delay,” while HIPAA regulation requires healthcare organizations report breaches within 60 days after a breach is discovered.

The proposed rule creates a 30-day breach notification rule, from the time the organization determines “there is sufficient evidence to conclude that a security breach has taken place."

And “in the case of a conflict between the time period for notice to individuals [under Colorado law or federal regulation or law], the law or regulation with the shortest time frame for notice to the individual controls," according to the amended bill.

[Also: Iowa legislature proposes requiring orgs to report breaches within 45 days]

Also noteworthy, the bill’s language regarding personal information extends further than HIPAA language to include passwords, passcodes and the like, so providers will need to make sure they are compliant with the state’s statute.

The legislation has been referred to the Committee on Appropriations for consideration. If the bill passes, Colorado would join Florida as the toughest states on breach notification timelines.

[Also: Proposed Senate bill would fine, jail execs who conceal data breaches]

Florida also has a 30-day notification rule, but allows an additional 15 days if there’s a “good cause for the delay.”

States have been steadily proposing modifications to privacy laws, given the increase in cyberattacks. For example, North Carolina is currently considering legislation to give organizations just 15 days from time of discovery to report a breach.

Twitter: @JessieFDavis
Email the writer: jessica.davis@himssmedia.com

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Disable Auto Tagging: 
Short Headline: 
Colorado proposes requiring data breaches to be reported in 30 days
Newsletter hed: 
Colorado proposes requiring data breaches to be reported in 30 days
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The amended bill that would cut breach reporting time in half for healthcare providers, unanimously passed a State House committee meeting last week.
HOT @HIMSS: 
]]>
NIST looks to demystify blockchain, assesses its potential for healthcare http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/nist-looks-demystify-blockchain-assesses-its-potential-healthcare http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/nist-looks-demystify-blockchain-assesses-its-potential-healthcare Mon, 19 Feb 2018 08:53:32 CST walmeida at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy According to Gartner's famous Hype Cycle, blockchain technology has already begun its precipitous slide into the trough of disillusionment, with five to 10 years still to go until it finds a steady perch on the plateau of productivity. But that's not to say there aren't plenty of useful applications and advances that can be innovated between now and then. Gartner itself is bullish on blockchain's prospects. Despite the fact that industries such as healthcare are still sizing up the distributed ledger technology – and a lack of proven use cases, coupled with bitcoin's recent volatility, have led to concerns about its viability – analysts think that longer term, blockchain "will lead to a reformation of whole industries." Plenty of potential use cases are being piloted for healthcare, from revenue cycle to pharmacy supply chain, precision medicine to patient engagement. At HIMSS18, there will be no shortage of sessions devoted to exploring the often misunderstood – if not outright mystifying – technology, and trying to bring its future into clearer focus. [Also: A guide to blockchain at HIMSS18] A recent draft report from the National Institute of Standards and Technology also attempts to do just that. NIST's "Blockchain Technology Overview" aims to help IT decision-makers in healthcare and other industries sift through the considerable hype to make "clear-eyed" choices about how they could (or should) deploy blockchain. "We want to help people understand how blockchains work so that they can appropriately and usefully apply them to technology problems," said one of its authors, NIST computer scientist Dylan Yaga. "It’s an introduction to the things you should understand and think about if you want to use blockchain." We've explained how it all works, and NIST's description is well worth a read, too: "Blockchains are immutable digital ledger systems implemented in a distributed fashion (i.e., without a central repository) and usually without a central authority. At their most basic level, they enable a community of users to record transactions in a ledger that is public to that community, such that no transaction can be changed once published," researchers write. "The wallets are used to sign transactions sent from one wallet to another, recording the transferred value publicly, allowing all participants of the network to independently verify the validity of the transactions. Each participant can keep a full record of all transactions, making the network resilient to attempts to alter that record (or forge transactions) later." [Also: Blockchain beyond EHRs: Transforming value-based payment, precision medicine, patient-centric care] As blockchain has grown past its origin story, NIST noted with some understatement, that there is a high level of hype around its use cases – even as the technology is not well understood. While it's innovative and intriguing, blockchain "is not magical," researchers write. "It will not solve all problems. As with all new technology, there is a tendency to want to apply it to every sector in every way imaginable." In healthcare specifically, there are plenty of places it could soon transform processes in real and tangible ways. "Whenever someone visits a care provider, a myriad of transactions take place behind the scenes," NIST scientists said. "Administrative transactions from nurses, doctors, staff, medical providers, insurance companies, and pharmacies could all be written to a blockchain. Transactions (such as checking benefits, eligibility, coverage, and the available medicine supply) could be read from the blockchain." It all sounds great, in theory. But NIST’s new draft report -- with which the agency is embarking on an initiative to effectively demystify blockchain -- is meant to offer "a high-level understanding of the technology so that it can be applied effectively." Specifically, NIST researchers want to help ensure organizations considering rolling out blockchain pilots have thought through the practical considerations of using the technology. "For example, what happens when an organization implements a blockchain system and then decides they need to make modifications to the data stored?" they write. "When using a database, this can be accomplished through a simple query (or major changes can be made by updating the database schema or software)." But with blockchain, "it is much more difficult to change data or update the 'database’ software," according to NIST. "Organizations need to understand the extreme difficulty in changing anything that is already on the blockchain." Ultimately, blockchain technologies "have the power to disrupt many industries," said researchers. "To avoid missed opportunities and undesirable surprises, organizations should start investigating whether or not a blockchain can help them." NIST is accepting comments on the draft report through February 23. They can be emailed to nistir8202-comments@nist.gov. Future-proofing security Why cybersecurity is top of mind for forward-looking healthcare orgs. Twitter: @MikeMiliardHITN Email the writer: mike.miliard@himssmedia.com Primary Topic: Revenue CycleAdditional Topics: Revenue CycleFinanceFinancial ManagementFinancePolicyInteroperabilityTechnologyTechnologySecurityTechnologySecuritySpecific Terms: Privacy & SecurityPrivacy & SecurityCustom Tags: Revenue CycleFinancial ManagementInteroperabilityPrivacy & SecurityPrivacy & SecurityDisable Auto Tagging: Short Headline: NIST looks to demystify blockchain, assesses its potential for healthcareNewsletter hed: NIST looks to demystify blockchain, assesses its potential for healthcareNewsletter teaser: The federal agency aims to help IT decision makers sift through the hype to make "clear-eyed" choices about how they could (or should) deploy blockchain.HOT @HIMSS: 

According to Gartner's famous Hype Cycle, blockchain technology has already begun its precipitous slide into the trough of disillusionment, with five to 10 years still to go until it finds a steady perch on the plateau of productivity.

But that's not to say there aren't plenty of useful applications and advances that can be innovated between now and then.

Gartner itself is bullish on blockchain's prospects. Despite the fact that industries such as healthcare are still sizing up the distributed ledger technology – and a lack of proven use cases, coupled with bitcoin's recent volatility, have led to concerns about its viability – analysts think that longer term, blockchain "will lead to a reformation of whole industries."

Plenty of potential use cases are being piloted for healthcare, from revenue cycle to pharmacy supply chain, precision medicine to patient engagement. At HIMSS18, there will be no shortage of sessions devoted to exploring the often misunderstood – if not outright mystifying – technology, and trying to bring its future into clearer focus.

[Also: A guide to blockchain at HIMSS18]

A recent draft report from the National Institute of Standards and Technology also attempts to do just that. NIST's "Blockchain Technology Overview" aims to help IT decision-makers in healthcare and other industries sift through the considerable hype to make "clear-eyed" choices about how they could (or should) deploy blockchain.

"We want to help people understand how blockchains work so that they can appropriately and usefully apply them to technology problems," said one of its authors, NIST computer scientist Dylan Yaga. "It’s an introduction to the things you should understand and think about if you want to use blockchain."

We've explained how it all works, and NIST's description is well worth a read, too:

"Blockchains are immutable digital ledger systems implemented in a distributed fashion (i.e., without a central repository) and usually without a central authority. At their most basic level, they enable a community of users to record transactions in a ledger that is public to that community, such that no transaction can be changed once published," researchers write. "The wallets are used to sign transactions sent from one wallet to another, recording the transferred value publicly, allowing all participants of the network to independently verify the validity of the transactions. Each participant can keep a full record of all transactions, making the network resilient to attempts to alter that record (or forge transactions) later."

[Also: Blockchain beyond EHRs: Transforming value-based payment, precision medicine, patient-centric care]

As blockchain has grown past its origin story, NIST noted with some understatement, that there is a high level of hype around its use cases – even as the technology is not well understood.

While it's innovative and intriguing, blockchain "is not magical," researchers write. "It will not solve all problems. As with all new technology, there is a tendency to want to apply it to every sector in every way imaginable."

In healthcare specifically, there are plenty of places it could soon transform processes in real and tangible ways.

"Whenever someone visits a care provider, a myriad of transactions take place behind the scenes," NIST scientists said. "Administrative transactions from nurses, doctors, staff, medical providers, insurance companies, and pharmacies could all be written to a blockchain. Transactions (such as checking benefits, eligibility, coverage, and the available medicine supply) could be read from the blockchain."

It all sounds great, in theory.

But NIST’s new draft report -- with which the agency is embarking on an initiative to effectively demystify blockchain -- is meant to offer "a high-level understanding of the technology so that it can be applied effectively." Specifically, NIST researchers want to help ensure organizations considering rolling out blockchain pilots have thought through the practical considerations of using the technology.

"For example, what happens when an organization implements a blockchain system and then decides they need to make modifications to the data stored?" they write. "When using a database, this can be accomplished through a simple query (or major changes can be made by updating the database schema or software)."

But with blockchain, "it is much more difficult to change data or update the 'database’ software," according to NIST. "Organizations need to understand the extreme difficulty in changing anything that is already on the blockchain."

Ultimately, blockchain technologies "have the power to disrupt many industries," said researchers. "To avoid missed opportunities and undesirable surprises, organizations should start investigating whether or not a blockchain can help them."

NIST is accepting comments on the draft report through February 23. They can be emailed to nistir8202-comments@nist.gov.

Future-proofing security

Why cybersecurity is top of mind for forward-looking healthcare orgs.

Twitter: @MikeMiliardHITN
Email the writer: mike.miliard@himssmedia.com

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Short Headline: 
NIST looks to demystify blockchain, assesses its potential for healthcare
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NIST looks to demystify blockchain, assesses its potential for healthcare
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The federal agency aims to help IT decision makers sift through the hype to make "clear-eyed" choices about how they could (or should) deploy blockchain.
HOT @HIMSS: 
]]>
PHAT Life: Effective HIV intervention for youth in the criminal justice system http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/phat-life-effective-hiv-intervention-youth-criminal-justice-system http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/phat-life-effective-hiv-intervention-youth-criminal-justice-system Fri, 16 Feb 2018 17:30:00 CST NIH News Release Program showed great potential for reducing sexual risk-taking. ]]> HHS plan for the opioid crisis: Track prescribing patterns with Medicaid data http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/hhs-plan-opioid-crisis-track-prescribing-patterns-medicaid-data http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/hhs-plan-opioid-crisis-track-prescribing-patterns-medicaid-data Fri, 16 Feb 2018 15:14:10 CST walmeida at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy President Trump’s proposed FY19 budget for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services stresses the need for the agency to make the opioid crisis a top priority. While HHS’ budget would be slashed by 21 percent, Trump would give the agency $10 billion in new discretionary funding for both the opioid epidemic and mental illness. To accomplish this, HHS wants to track high prescribers and utilizers of prescription drugs within Medicaid. HHS Secretary Alex Azar told the House Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Health that the agency would “require states to monitor high-risk billing activity to identify and remediate abnormal prescribing and utilization patterns that may indicate abuse in the Medicaid system.” [Also: Alliance to press lawmakers to fight opioid abuse with interoperability] HHS could leverage data from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to help “identify a practitioner who is writing an inordinate number of prescriptions,” Rep. Michael Burgess, MD, R-Texas, told Azar. And those trends could be easy to spot within those databases. In addition to leveraging Medicaid data, HHS could potentially look to state PDMP data to identify bad actors, Azar testified. The agency could also use its “authority to make sure that whenever we exclude a provider, it will automatically lead to transmission of that information [to the Drug Enforcement Administration].” The DEA would have the authority to yank a provider’s ability to prescribe controlled substances, Azar said. [Also: OCR revamps HIPAA guidance in wake of opioid crisis, 21st Century Cures rules] Further, PDMPs are already helping states track opioid prescriptions, as they flag patients with suspicious prescribing history, said Azar. But as part of the HHS budget proposal, the agency asks Congress to “require states have effective programs for this type of risk identification.” At the moment, all states except Missouri currently have PDMPs in place, with varying degrees of use. After Trump declared the opioid crisis a public health emergency, many states have sought changes to laws to increase PDMP efforts and data sharing among states. While Azar supports the continued interoperability efforts between state PDMPs, “there is a resource and burden question about forcing that interoperability to be nationwide.” Azar told the committee data sharing between bordering states might be more realistic. The committee also noted that past PDMP efforts by federal agencies to integrate data within EHRs had slowed five years ago. The effort, Burgess told Azar, is “one of the opportunities to reduce the burden on practicing physicians is a way to seamlessly integrate” EHR and PDMP databases. However, there are states currently sharing data between PDMPs. Just last week, North Carolina became the 46th state to sign onto the PDMP data sharing collective, which is designed to give providers the full prescribing history of patients across state lines. Twitter: @JessieFDavis Email the writer: jessica.davis@himssmedia.com Primary Topic: PolicyAdditional Topics: PolicyPolicyDisable Auto Tagging: Short Headline: HHS plan for the opioid crisis: Track prescribing patterns with Medicaid dataNewsletter hed: HHS plan for the opioid crisis: Track prescribing patterns with Medicaid dataNewsletter teaser: As part of its FY19 budget request, the agency is looking into how to leverage PDMPs to track prescribing histories, as well as reporting suspected abuse to the DEA.HOT @HIMSS: 

President Trump’s proposed FY19 budget for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services stresses the need for the agency to make the opioid crisis a top priority.

While HHS’ budget would be slashed by 21 percent, Trump would give the agency $10 billion in new discretionary funding for both the opioid epidemic and mental illness. To accomplish this, HHS wants to track high prescribers and utilizers of prescription drugs within Medicaid.

HHS Secretary Alex Azar told the House Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Health that the agency would “require states to monitor high-risk billing activity to identify and remediate abnormal prescribing and utilization patterns that may indicate abuse in the Medicaid system.”

[Also: Alliance to press lawmakers to fight opioid abuse with interoperability]

HHS could leverage data from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to help “identify a practitioner who is writing an inordinate number of prescriptions,” Rep. Michael Burgess, MD, R-Texas, told Azar. And those trends could be easy to spot within those databases.

In addition to leveraging Medicaid data, HHS could potentially look to state PDMP data to identify bad actors, Azar testified. The agency could also use its “authority to make sure that whenever we exclude a provider, it will automatically lead to transmission of that information [to the Drug Enforcement Administration].”

The DEA would have the authority to yank a provider’s ability to prescribe controlled substances, Azar said.

[Also: OCR revamps HIPAA guidance in wake of opioid crisis, 21st Century Cures rules]

Further, PDMPs are already helping states track opioid prescriptions, as they flag patients with suspicious prescribing history, said Azar. But as part of the HHS budget proposal, the agency asks Congress to “require states have effective programs for this type of risk identification.”

At the moment, all states except Missouri currently have PDMPs in place, with varying degrees of use. After Trump declared the opioid crisis a public health emergency, many states have sought changes to laws to increase PDMP efforts and data sharing among states.

While Azar supports the continued interoperability efforts between state PDMPs, “there is a resource and burden question about forcing that interoperability to be nationwide.” Azar told the committee data sharing between bordering states might be more realistic.

The committee also noted that past PDMP efforts by federal agencies to integrate data within EHRs had slowed five years ago. The effort, Burgess told Azar, is “one of the opportunities to reduce the burden on practicing physicians is a way to seamlessly integrate” EHR and PDMP databases.

However, there are states currently sharing data between PDMPs. Just last week, North Carolina became the 46th state to sign onto the PDMP data sharing collective, which is designed to give providers the full prescribing history of patients across state lines.

Twitter: @JessieFDavis
Email the writer: jessica.davis@himssmedia.com

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Short Headline: 
HHS plan for the opioid crisis: Track prescribing patterns with Medicaid data
Newsletter hed: 
HHS plan for the opioid crisis: Track prescribing patterns with Medicaid data
Newsletter teaser: 
As part of its FY19 budget request, the agency is looking into how to leverage PDMPs to track prescribing histories, as well as reporting suspected abuse to the DEA.
HOT @HIMSS: 
]]>
House balks at $10 billion price tag for VA-Cerner EHR project http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/house-balks-10-billion-price-tag-va-cerner-ehr-project http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/house-balks-10-billion-price-tag-va-cerner-ehr-project Fri, 16 Feb 2018 12:04:56 CST walmeida at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy As the time draws near for the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs to sign its EHR contract with Cerner, Congressional members are growing increasingly concerned over not only the $10 billion price tag, but that the agency will need to keep the legacy system in place, perhaps indefinitely. “While the EHR modernization effort is necessary, it is very expensive,” House VA Committee Chairman Phil Roe, MD, R-Tennessee, said during the Thursday hearing on the VA’s 2019 budget requests. [Also: Trump earmarks $1.2 billion for VA-Cerner EHR project in proposed budget] “The contract with Cerner alone has a price tag of about $10 billion and that doesn’t even include the costs of updating infrastructure to accommodate the new EHR, implementation support or sustaining VistA up until the day it can be turned off,” he continued. In fact, Roe is concerned that the VA’s legacy EHR may never be completely gone. “After visiting Fairchild Air Force Base in Spokane, Washington, recently, I’m not even sure you can ever turn VistA off,” Roe said. President Donald Trump released his proposed FY19 budget this week, which earmarked $1.2 billion to get the project with Cerner off the ground. VA Secretary David Shulkin, MD put the potential Cerner contract on hold in January, pending an independent review of Cerner’s interoperability capabilities. While Roe applauded Shulkin’s move to ensure interoperability, he’s still not certain the project can be successful. “It’s unthinkable that VA could potentially spend billions of dollars on a project that doesn’t substantially increase the department’s ability to share information with the Department of Defense or community providers,” Roe said. “But that’s exactly what could happen if VA fails to proceed in a careful deliberate manner.” In response, Shulkin stressed that the agency is taking the modernization very seriously.  “We have to make sure that we can be interoperable with dozens of different health systems out there,” said Shulkin. “And that’s a challenge that frankly the American healthcare system hasn’t figured out yet... We think VA can help lead this for the whole country by making this interoperable.” Shulkin recognized the agency’s track record of failed IT projects – the Government Accountability Office recently reported that the VA likely wasted at least $1.1 billion on multiple EHR modernization attempts – and understands that this EHR replacement must work. Given the size and scope of the project – there are more than 130 versions of VistA operating right now – Shulkin said the legacy system will need to be maintained over a 10-year implementation period. To account for that, Shulkin is requesting Congress provide the VA a separate account to fund the project. The account would provide the VA with the necessary funds for maintaining VistA and implementing the Cerner EHR, and would provide transparency to where those funds are going. The VA is expected to sign the Cerner contract in the next few weeks, after the vendor reportedly passed its independent assessment. Twitter: @JessieFDavis Email the writer: jessica.davis@himssmedia.com Primary Topic: Electronic Health RecordsAdditional Topics: TechnologyEHRPolicyTechnologyEHRSpecific Terms: Electronic Health RecordsElectronic Health RecordsCustom Tags: Electronic Health RecordsElectronic Health RecordsDisable Auto Tagging: Short Headline: House balks at $10 billion price tag for VA-Cerner EHR projectNewsletter hed: House balks at $10 billion price tag for VA-Cerner EHR projectNewsletter teaser: VA Committee Chair Phil Roe was also concerned that the amount doesn’t cover maintenance or the cost to update the infrastructure necessary to accommodate the new platform.HOT @HIMSS: 

As the time draws near for the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs to sign its EHR contract with Cerner, Congressional members are growing increasingly concerned over not only the $10 billion price tag, but that the agency will need to keep the legacy system in place, perhaps indefinitely.

“While the EHR modernization effort is necessary, it is very expensive,” House VA Committee Chairman Phil Roe, MD, R-Tennessee, said during the Thursday hearing on the VA’s 2019 budget requests.

[Also: Trump earmarks $1.2 billion for VA-Cerner EHR project in proposed budget]

“The contract with Cerner alone has a price tag of about $10 billion and that doesn’t even include the costs of updating infrastructure to accommodate the new EHR, implementation support or sustaining VistA up until the day it can be turned off,” he continued.

In fact, Roe is concerned that the VA’s legacy EHR may never be completely gone.

“After visiting Fairchild Air Force Base in Spokane, Washington, recently, I’m not even sure you can ever turn VistA off,” Roe said.

President Donald Trump released his proposed FY19 budget this week, which earmarked $1.2 billion to get the project with Cerner off the ground. VA Secretary David Shulkin, MD put the potential Cerner contract on hold in January, pending an independent review of Cerner’s interoperability capabilities.

While Roe applauded Shulkin’s move to ensure interoperability, he’s still not certain the project can be successful.

“It’s unthinkable that VA could potentially spend billions of dollars on a project that doesn’t substantially increase the department’s ability to share information with the Department of Defense or community providers,” Roe said. “But that’s exactly what could happen if VA fails to proceed in a careful deliberate manner.”

In response, Shulkin stressed that the agency is taking the modernization very seriously. 

“We have to make sure that we can be interoperable with dozens of different health systems out there,” said Shulkin. “And that’s a challenge that frankly the American healthcare system hasn’t figured out yet... We think VA can help lead this for the whole country by making this interoperable.”

Shulkin recognized the agency’s track record of failed IT projects – the Government Accountability Office recently reported that the VA likely wasted at least $1.1 billion on multiple EHR modernization attempts – and understands that this EHR replacement must work.

Given the size and scope of the project – there are more than 130 versions of VistA operating right now – Shulkin said the legacy system will need to be maintained over a 10-year implementation period.

To account for that, Shulkin is requesting Congress provide the VA a separate account to fund the project. The account would provide the VA with the necessary funds for maintaining VistA and implementing the Cerner EHR, and would provide transparency to where those funds are going.

The VA is expected to sign the Cerner contract in the next few weeks, after the vendor reportedly passed its independent assessment.

Twitter: @JessieFDavis
Email the writer: jessica.davis@himssmedia.com

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House balks at $10 billion price tag for VA-Cerner EHR project
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House balks at $10 billion price tag for VA-Cerner EHR project
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VA Committee Chair Phil Roe was also concerned that the amount doesn’t cover maintenance or the cost to update the infrastructure necessary to accommodate the new platform.
HOT @HIMSS: 
]]>
Anthem alters controversial ER coverage policies http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/anthem-er-coverage-policy-changes?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/anthem-er-coverage-policy-changes?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 16 Feb 2018 11:50:13 CST Leslie Small at FierceHealthcare: Payer Seeking to address mounting concerns from providers and other stakeholders, Anthem has made changes to policies it previously rolled out that restrict coverage for emergency room visits. The insurer has implemented a series of “always pay” exceptions for certain circumstances, like when the patient received any kind of surgery or an MRI or CT scan. Anthem alters controversial ER coverage policies http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/anthem-er-coverage-policy-changes?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/anthem-er-coverage-policy-changes?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 16 Feb 2018 11:50:13 CST Leslie Small at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Seeking to address mounting concerns from providers and other stakeholders, Anthem has made changes to policies it previously rolled out that restrict coverage for emergency room visits. The insurer has implemented a series of “always pay” exceptions for certain circumstances, like when the patient received any kind of surgery or an MRI or CT scan. Roche to buy Flatiron Health for $1.9B http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/ehr/roche-flatiron-health-1-9b?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/ehr/roche-flatiron-health-1-9b?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 16 Feb 2018 11:09:17 CST Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: It One of the world’s largest pharmaceutical companies has agreed to buy Flatiron Health, a health IT company that built an EHR specifically for oncology providers that collects data for cancer research. The $1.9 billion deal is expected to close in the first half of 2018. Roche to buy Flatiron Health for $1.9B http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/ehr/roche-flatiron-health-1-9b?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/ehr/roche-flatiron-health-1-9b?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 16 Feb 2018 11:09:17 CST Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: It One of the world’s largest pharmaceutical companies has agreed to buy Flatiron Health, a health IT company that built an EHR specifically for oncology providers that collects data for cancer research. The $1.9 billion deal is expected to close in the first half of 2018. Azar plays coy about HHS stance on new Idaho plans, Medicaid lifetime caps http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/alex-azar-idaho-plans-medicaid-lifetime-caps?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/alex-azar-idaho-plans-medicaid-lifetime-caps?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 16 Feb 2018 10:40:28 CST Leslie Small at FierceHealthcare: Payer Under questioning from Democratic lawmakers Thursday, Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar declined to say how his department will respond to two types of state-driven policy changes that have stirred up controversy. VA head Shulkin to reimburse disputed European travel expenses, but Dems call for hearing over controversy http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/healthcare/va-head-s-european-trip-drama-continues-shulkin-will-reimburse-disputed-expenses-but-won?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/healthcare/va-head-s-european-trip-drama-continues-shulkin-will-reimburse-disputed-expenses-but-won?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 16 Feb 2018 10:30:06 CST Ilene MacDonald at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Veterans Affairs Secretary David Shulkin, M.D., says he will reimburse travel expenses that were the subject of an internal investigation into a trip he took to Europe this summer, but that may not put an end to the controversy. One lawmaker has called for Shulkin’s resignation, and four Democrats have requested a hearing about the trip. OIG emphasizes the impact of sophisticated data analytics in 2019 budget request http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/aca/oig-budget-data-analytics?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/aca/oig-budget-data-analytics?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 16 Feb 2018 10:23:38 CST Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: Payer The HHS Office of Inspector General is asking Congress for an additional $23.7 million to support the Health Care Fraud and Abuse Control program that has paid notable dividends for the government by leveraging sophisticated data analytics. OIG emphasizes the impact of sophisticated data analytics in 2019 budget request http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/aca/oig-budget-data-analytics?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/aca/oig-budget-data-analytics?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 16 Feb 2018 10:23:38 CST Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: It The HHS Office of Inspector General is asking Congress for an additional $23.7 million to support the Health Care Fraud and Abuse Control program that has paid notable dividends for the government by leveraging sophisticated data analytics. OIG emphasizes the impact of sophisticated data analytics in 2019 budget request http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/aca/oig-budget-data-analytics?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/aca/oig-budget-data-analytics?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 16 Feb 2018 10:23:38 CST Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: It The HHS Office of Inspector General is asking Congress for an additional $23.7 million to support the Health Care Fraud and Abuse Control program that has paid notable dividends for the government by leveraging sophisticated data analytics. Why the courts may overturn Medicaid work requirements http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/cms-chip/medicaid-work-requirements-courts-eliot-fishman?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/cms-chip/medicaid-work-requirements-courts-eliot-fishman?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 16 Feb 2018 09:15:28 CST Leslie Small at FierceHealthcare: Payer With one lawsuit already challenging Medicaid work requirements in Kentucky and more possible in other states, health policy watchers have one burning question: What will the courts decide? According to Eliot Fishman—who was the director of the State Demonstrations Group at the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services from 2013 until early 2017—there’s a good chance that judges will overturn those waiver approvals. Allscripts managed to buy Practice Fusion and McKesson for just $50M http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/ehr/allscripts-practice-fusion-onecontent-50m?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/ehr/allscripts-practice-fusion-onecontent-50m?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 16 Feb 2018 09:10:53 CST Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare In less than six months, Allscripts acquired two EHR platforms by Practice Fusion and McKesson for a grand total of $50 million by divesting a portion of McKesson's business for 27% more than it paid for the entire health IT portfolio. Allscripts President Rick Poulton said the new acquisitions will generate more than $300 million in recurring annual revenue. Allscripts managed to buy Practice Fusion and McKesson for just $50M http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/ehr/allscripts-practice-fusion-onecontent-50m?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/ehr/allscripts-practice-fusion-onecontent-50m?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 16 Feb 2018 09:10:53 CST Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: It In less than six months, Allscripts acquired two EHR platforms by Practice Fusion and McKesson for a grand total of $50 million by divesting a portion of McKesson's business for 27% more than it paid for the entire health IT portfolio. Allscripts President Rick Poulton said the new acquisitions will generate more than $300 million in recurring annual revenue. Allscripts managed to buy Practice Fusion and McKesson for just $50M http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/ehr/allscripts-practice-fusion-onecontent-50m?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/ehr/allscripts-practice-fusion-onecontent-50m?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 16 Feb 2018 09:10:53 CST Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: It In less than six months, Allscripts acquired two EHR platforms by Practice Fusion and McKesson for a grand total of $50 million by divesting a portion of McKesson's business for 27% more than it paid for the entire health IT portfolio. Allscripts President Rick Poulton said the new acquisitions will generate more than $300 million in recurring annual revenue. Healthcare consolidation doesn't pay off for patients, experts tell lawmakers at hearing http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/healthcare-consolidation-mergers-premiums-healthcare-costs-congress?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/healthcare-consolidation-mergers-premiums-healthcare-costs-congress?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 16 Feb 2018 08:33:14 CST Paige Minemyer at FierceHealthcare: Payer There is little evidence that healthcare consolidation improves patient care or lowers healthcare costs, experts told lawmakers at a hearing this week. The speakers, economic and health policy experts from Harvard, Duke University and Carnegie Mellon, don't expect healthcare's drive for mergers to slow down, however. Healthcare consolidation doesn't pay off for patients, experts tell lawmakers at hearing http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/healthcare-consolidation-mergers-premiums-healthcare-costs-congress?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/healthcare-consolidation-mergers-premiums-healthcare-costs-congress?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 16 Feb 2018 08:33:14 CST Paige Minemyer at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare There is little evidence that healthcare consolidation improves patient care or lowers healthcare costs, experts told lawmakers at a hearing this week. The speakers, economic and health policy experts from Harvard, Duke University and Carnegie Mellon, don't expect healthcare's drive for mergers to slow down, however. Epilepsy study links mossy brain cells to seizures and memory loss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/epilepsy-study-links-mossy-brain-cells-seizures-memory-loss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/epilepsy-study-links-mossy-brain-cells-seizures-memory-loss Thu, 15 Feb 2018 19:45:00 CST NIH News Release NIH-funded study in mice suggests loss of mossy cells plays a critical role in both. ]]> FDA budget requests include clinical software, natural language processing and real-time device data http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/fda-budget-requests-include-clinical-software-natural-language-processing-and-real-time-device http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/fda-budget-requests-include-clinical-software-natural-language-processing-and-real-time-device Thu, 15 Feb 2018 13:09:40 CST walmeida at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, MD, released the agency’s budget requests for fiscal 2018 Tuesday, outlining digital health plans for the year. The budget proposed by the Trump Administration would give the FDA $5.8 billion, an increase of $673 million, and would include an additional $190 million for new user fee funding. The requested budget would support the FDA’s continued focus on software. In its list of budget requests, Gottlieb said he wants to create a medical data enterprise, which will use “near-real-time evidence evaluation, down to the level of individual electronic health records for at least 10 million individuals.” [Also: Trump signs spending bill into law: Here are health IT's biggest wins] The idea, Gottlieb wrote, is to provide a more efficient way to develop clinical data to better inform product review and promote innovation. To accomplish this, the FDA would use natural language processing to assess data submitted to the FDA, which would “speed recognition and remediation of emerging safety concerns.” The program would cover the full range of medical products from medical devices to biologics and cover gaps in healthcare settings not currently part of FDA surveillance. [Also: Trump earmarks $1.2 billion for VA-Cerner EHR project in proposed budget] To Gottlieb, the added real-time evidence “would generate processes that could improve the efficiency of the regulatory process, better inform patients and providers about pre- and post-market safety, [and] reduce some of the burdens that drive up the time and cost required to bring beneficial innovations to the market.” It would also combat current data challenges “around the real-world use of products hard to collect and evaluate,” he continued. Gottlieb also announced the FDA is launching a Center of Excellence on Digital Health, which he explained would create a new way to evaluate and recognize third-party certifiers. The center would also include a cybersecurity unit to support software-based devices. Under Gottlieb, the FDA has been working toward speeding up the approval process for medical devices. In December, the agency announced a new voluntary approval pathway, using more modern criteria to compare devices to standards more in line with the tech being evaluated. Twitter: @JessieFDavis Email the writer: jessica.davis@himssmedia.com Primary Topic: PolicyAdditional Topics: PolicyPolicyDisable Auto Tagging: Short Headline: FDA budget requests include clinical software, natural language processing and real-time device dataNewsletter hed: FDA budget requests include clinical software, natural language processing and real-time device dataNewsletter teaser: Agency Chief Scott Gottlieb also will establish a Center of Excellence on Digital Health designed to create a new way to evaluate third-party certifiers and supported by a cybersecurity unit.HOT @HIMSS: 

Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, MD, released the agency’s budget requests for fiscal 2018 Tuesday, outlining digital health plans for the year.

The budget proposed by the Trump Administration would give the FDA $5.8 billion, an increase of $673 million, and would include an additional $190 million for new user fee funding.

The requested budget would support the FDA’s continued focus on software. In its list of budget requests, Gottlieb said he wants to create a medical data enterprise, which will use “near-real-time evidence evaluation, down to the level of individual electronic health records for at least 10 million individuals.”

[Also: Trump signs spending bill into law: Here are health IT's biggest wins]

The idea, Gottlieb wrote, is to provide a more efficient way to develop clinical data to better inform product review and promote innovation. To accomplish this, the FDA would use natural language processing to assess data submitted to the FDA, which would “speed recognition and remediation of emerging safety concerns.”

The program would cover the full range of medical products from medical devices to biologics and cover gaps in healthcare settings not currently part of FDA surveillance.

[Also: Trump earmarks $1.2 billion for VA-Cerner EHR project in proposed budget]

To Gottlieb, the added real-time evidence “would generate processes that could improve the efficiency of the regulatory process, better inform patients and providers about pre- and post-market safety, [and] reduce some of the burdens that drive up the time and cost required to bring beneficial innovations to the market.”

It would also combat current data challenges “around the real-world use of products hard to collect and evaluate,” he continued.

Gottlieb also announced the FDA is launching a Center of Excellence on Digital Health, which he explained would create a new way to evaluate and recognize third-party certifiers. The center would also include a cybersecurity unit to support software-based devices.

Under Gottlieb, the FDA has been working toward speeding up the approval process for medical devices. In December, the agency announced a new voluntary approval pathway, using more modern criteria to compare devices to standards more in line with the tech being evaluated.

Twitter: @JessieFDavis
Email the writer: jessica.davis@himssmedia.com

Primary Topic: 
Additional Topics: 
Disable Auto Tagging: 
Short Headline: 
FDA budget requests include clinical software, natural language processing and real-time device data
Newsletter hed: 
FDA budget requests include clinical software, natural language processing and real-time device data
Newsletter teaser: 
Agency Chief Scott Gottlieb also will establish a Center of Excellence on Digital Health designed to create a new way to evaluate third-party certifiers and supported by a cybersecurity unit.
HOT @HIMSS: 
]]>
As Idaho insurer offers plans that skirt the ACA, some in GOP warm to healthcare law fixes http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/aca/as-idaho-insurer-offers-plans-skirt-aca-some-gop-warm-to-healthcare-law-fixes?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/aca/as-idaho-insurer-offers-plans-skirt-aca-some-gop-warm-to-healthcare-law-fixes?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Thu, 15 Feb 2018 11:30:01 CST Leslie Small at FierceHealthcare: Payer Blue Cross of Idaho has become the first insurer to respond to the state’s controversial executive order that encourages the sale of health plans that don’t comply with the Affordable Care Act. Meanwhile, some Republicans are increasingly embracing measures to shore up the individual marketplaces, such as reinsurance. Study suggests gender bias by women physicians can influence care decisions http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/study-gender-bias-by-women-physicians-influence-decisions-icu?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/study-gender-bias-by-women-physicians-influence-decisions-icu?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Thu, 15 Feb 2018 11:02:09 CST Joanne Finnegan at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare A female patient treated by a female doctor is less likely to be admitted to a restricted intensive care unit, where beds and other resources are limited, according to a new study. The research is touted as first-of-its kind proof that gender bias affects treatment decisions—but stopped short of delving into the consequences. Penn Medicine launches new telehealth hub as interest in virtual services mounts nationwide http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/mobile/penn-medicine-telehealth-ann-mond-johnson?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/mobile/penn-medicine-telehealth-ann-mond-johnson?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Thu, 15 Feb 2018 10:53:08 CST Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Penn Medicine has launched a Center for Connected Health, which features 50 full-time employees and pulls together several telehealth programs geared toward urgent care, ICU patients and those with chronic illnesses. The new center comes at a time when healthcare executives across the country see telehealth as a high priority. Penn Medicine launches new telehealth hub as interest in virtual services mounts nationwide http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/mobile/penn-medicine-telehealth-ann-mond-johnson?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/mobile/penn-medicine-telehealth-ann-mond-johnson?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Thu, 15 Feb 2018 10:53:08 CST Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: It Penn Medicine has launched a Center for Connected Health, which features 50 full-time employees and pulls together several telehealth programs geared toward urgent care, ICU patients and those with chronic illnesses. The new center comes at a time when healthcare executives across the country see telehealth as a high priority. Penn Medicine launches new telehealth hub as interest in virtual services mounts nationwide http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/mobile/penn-medicine-telehealth-ann-mond-johnson?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/mobile/penn-medicine-telehealth-ann-mond-johnson?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Thu, 15 Feb 2018 10:53:08 CST Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: It Penn Medicine has launched a Center for Connected Health, which features 50 full-time employees and pulls together several telehealth programs geared toward urgent care, ICU patients and those with chronic illnesses. The new center comes at a time when healthcare executives across the country see telehealth as a high priority. Aetna slams 'gross misrepresentation' of clinical review process http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/aetna-hits-back-clinical-review-testimony?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/aetna-hits-back-clinical-review-testimony?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Thu, 15 Feb 2018 10:23:52 CST Leslie Small at FierceHealthcare: Payer Aetna is hitting back against recent news coverage that cast doubt on its clinical review process and led state officials to launch investigations. The insurer said that a deposition from one of its former medical directors was “taken out of context to create media and courtroom leverage, and is a gross misrepresentation of how the process actually works.” Aetna slams 'gross misrepresentation' of clinical review process http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/aetna-hits-back-clinical-review-testimony?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/aetna-hits-back-clinical-review-testimony?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Thu, 15 Feb 2018 10:23:52 CST Leslie Small at FierceHealthcare: It Aetna is hitting back against recent news coverage that cast doubt on its clinical review process and led state officials to launch investigations. The insurer said that a deposition from one of its former medical directors was “taken out of context to create media and courtroom leverage, and is a gross misrepresentation of how the process actually works.” Aetna slams 'gross misrepresentation' of clinical review process http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/aetna-hits-back-clinical-review-testimony?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/aetna-hits-back-clinical-review-testimony?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Thu, 15 Feb 2018 10:23:52 CST Leslie Small at FierceHealthcare: It Aetna is hitting back against recent news coverage that cast doubt on its clinical review process and led state officials to launch investigations. The insurer said that a deposition from one of its former medical directors was “taken out of context to create media and courtroom leverage, and is a gross misrepresentation of how the process actually works.” In New York, pay difference not only persists, it widens, between new male and female doctors http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/pay-difference-widens-salaries-male-and-female-doctors?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/pay-difference-widens-salaries-male-and-female-doctors?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Thu, 15 Feb 2018 10:01:08 CST Joanne Finnegan at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare A study that looked at new physicians in New York state had discouraging news for female doctors. Researchers found that not only have differences in pay persisted between newly trained male and female doctors, the gap has grown over time. The biggest difference in starting pay was among dermatologists, as male doctors earned $79,815 more than women. FDA’s Scott Gottlieb wants to use funding boost to create a Center of Excellence on Digital Health http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/fda-budget-center-excellence-digital-health?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/fda-budget-center-excellence-digital-health?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Thu, 15 Feb 2018 09:28:53 CST Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare The FDA plans to use approximately $400 million to create a Center of Excellence on Digital Health, which would house the agency's new precertification program, and develop analytic and natural language processing tools to integrate real-world data from at least 10 million EHRs. FDA’s Scott Gottlieb wants to use funding boost to create a Center of Excellence on Digital Health http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/fda-budget-center-excellence-digital-health?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/fda-budget-center-excellence-digital-health?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Thu, 15 Feb 2018 09:28:53 CST Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: It The FDA plans to use approximately $400 million to create a Center of Excellence on Digital Health, which would house the agency's new precertification program, and develop analytic and natural language processing tools to integrate real-world data from at least 10 million EHRs. FDA’s Scott Gottlieb wants to use funding boost to create a Center of Excellence on Digital Health http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/fda-budget-center-excellence-digital-health?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/fda-budget-center-excellence-digital-health?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Thu, 15 Feb 2018 09:28:53 CST Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: It The FDA plans to use approximately $400 million to create a Center of Excellence on Digital Health, which would house the agency's new precertification program, and develop analytic and natural language processing tools to integrate real-world data from at least 10 million EHRs. Physician Practice Roundup—Doctor sentenced to prison for fraud; Patients with depression go untreated http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/physician-practice-roundup-doctor-prison-fraud-depression?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/physician-practice-roundup-doctor-prison-fraud-depression?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Thu, 15 Feb 2018 08:00:33 CST Joanne Finnegan at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare A New York surgeon was sentenced to 13 years in prison for the submission of millions of dollars in false and fraudulent Medicare claims; Despite efforts to detect and treat depression during primary care visits, a study found that only one-third of patients who are diagnosed start treatment for the condition and more physician practice news from around the web. Physician Practice Roundup—Doctor sentenced to prison for fraud; Patients with depression go untreated http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/physician-practice-roundup-doctor-prison-fraud-depression?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/physician-practice-roundup-doctor-prison-fraud-depression?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Thu, 15 Feb 2018 08:00:33 CST Joanne Finnegan at FierceHealthcare: It A New York surgeon was sentenced to 13 years in prison for the submission of millions of dollars in false and fraudulent Medicare claims; Despite efforts to detect and treat depression during primary care visits, a study found that only one-third of patients who are diagnosed start treatment for the condition and more physician practice news from around the web. Physician Practice Roundup—Doctor sentenced to prison for fraud; Patients with depression go untreated http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/physician-practice-roundup-doctor-prison-fraud-depression?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/physician-practice-roundup-doctor-prison-fraud-depression?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Thu, 15 Feb 2018 08:00:33 CST Joanne Finnegan at FierceHealthcare: It A New York surgeon was sentenced to 13 years in prison for the submission of millions of dollars in false and fraudulent Medicare claims; Despite efforts to detect and treat depression during primary care visits, a study found that only one-third of patients who are diagnosed start treatment for the condition and more physician practice news from around the web. Physician Practice Roundup—Doctor sentenced to prison for fraud; Patients with depression go untreated http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/physician-practice-roundup-doctor-prison-fraud-depression?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/physician-practice-roundup-doctor-prison-fraud-depression?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Thu, 15 Feb 2018 08:00:33 CST Joanne Finnegan at FierceHealthcare: Payer A New York surgeon was sentenced to 13 years in prison for the submission of millions of dollars in false and fraudulent Medicare claims; Despite efforts to detect and treat depression during primary care visits, a study found that only one-third of patients who are diagnosed start treatment for the condition and more physician practice news from around the web. NIH solicits next-generation retina organoids in prize competition http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-solicits-next-generation-retina-organoids-prize-competition http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-solicits-next-generation-retina-organoids-prize-competition Wed, 14 Feb 2018 17:00:00 CST NIH News Release $1 million in prizes will be awarded for functional prototypes of human retinas for disease modeling, drug testing, and treatments. ]]> Industry Voices—What the Super Bowl taught me about balancing in-person care with digital tools http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/mobile/industry-voices-super-bowl-digital-health?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/mobile/industry-voices-super-bowl-digital-health?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Wed, 14 Feb 2018 15:59:58 CST Corbin Petro at FierceHealthcare: It At first glance, the Super Bowl appears to have little to do with healthcare. But healthcare, much like the sports world, is evolving to meet the needs of its consumers with new and different experiences, which requires a balance of in-person care and digital tools to care for patients virtually.