MedClimate Health News Daily http://medclimate.com/feed en-us Copyright MedClimate, Inc2017 4 healthcare execs weigh in on a supply chain conundrum http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/4-healthcare-execs-weigh-a-supply-chain-conundrum http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/4-healthcare-execs-weigh-a-supply-chain-conundrum Fri, 26 May 2017 11:40:22 CDT Ron Shinkman at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare The supply chain puts items into the hands of hospital staff. The problem is, sometimes they don’t want to let go—even when a change could save money. The Mayo Clinic, for instance, is trying to move away from a culture of buying what physicians want personally and instead shifting to buying what makes clinical sense, according to Dan Schmitz, Mayo’s senior director of procure to pay and supply chain informatics, at a recent executive breakfast and discussion on innovations and trends in healthcare supply chain practices. Unreliable wearable data puts physicians in a bind http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/mobile/unreliable-wearable-data-puts-physicians-a-bind http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/mobile/unreliable-wearable-data-puts-physicians-a-bind Fri, 26 May 2017 11:02:55 CDT Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare A new study shows wearable fitness trackers provide inaccurate measurements, but that’s not stopping patients from asking physicians to integrate that data into their medical care. A recent study reviewed seven fitness wearables and discovered all of them produced inaccurate calorie count measurements. But some specialists say patients are more inclined to bring that data to their physician. Unreliable wearable data puts physicians in a bind http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/mobile/unreliable-wearable-data-puts-physicians-a-bind http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/mobile/unreliable-wearable-data-puts-physicians-a-bind Fri, 26 May 2017 11:02:55 CDT Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: It A new study shows wearable fitness trackers provide inaccurate measurements, but that’s not stopping patients from asking physicians to integrate that data into their medical care. A recent study reviewed seven fitness wearables and discovered all of them produced inaccurate calorie count measurements. But some specialists say patients are more inclined to bring that data to their physician. Unreliable wearable data puts physicians in a bind http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/mobile/unreliable-wearable-data-puts-physicians-a-bind http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/mobile/unreliable-wearable-data-puts-physicians-a-bind Fri, 26 May 2017 11:02:55 CDT Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: It A new study shows wearable fitness trackers provide inaccurate measurements, but that’s not stopping patients from asking physicians to integrate that data into their medical care. A recent study reviewed seven fitness wearables and discovered all of them produced inaccurate calorie count measurements. But some specialists say patients are more inclined to bring that data to their physician. Healthcare fraud enforcement a priority for Department of Justice, official says http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/antifraud/fraud-enforcement-a-priority-for-department-justice-official-says http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/antifraud/fraud-enforcement-a-priority-for-department-justice-official-says Fri, 26 May 2017 10:32:13 CDT Paige Minemyer at FierceHealthcare: Payer Fighting healthcare fraud is a priority for the Department of Justice, as combating fraud is an issue that Attorney General Jeff Sessions feels strongly about, a department official said at a conference. Healthcare fraud enforcement a priority for Department of Justice, official says http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/antifraud/fraud-enforcement-a-priority-for-department-justice-official-says http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/antifraud/fraud-enforcement-a-priority-for-department-justice-official-says Fri, 26 May 2017 10:32:13 CDT Paige Minemyer at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Fighting healthcare fraud is a priority for the Department of Justice, as combating fraud is an issue that Attorney General Jeff Sessions feels strongly about, a department official said at a conference. Automated appointments help physician practice fill its patient schedule, save staff time http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/automated-appointments-help-one-practice-to-fill-its-patient-schedule http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/automated-appointments-help-one-practice-to-fill-its-patient-schedule Fri, 26 May 2017 10:31:45 CDT Joanne Finnegan at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare A program that automates patient schedules has made a difference for one Massachusetts multispecialty practice. Last year, Valley Medical Group, an 86-physician practice in Amherst, adopted an automated program to help fill last-minute patient cancellations. AHCA uncertainty has some health IT startups drifting away from providers http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/ahca-has-health-it-startups-pivoting-away-from-providers http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/ahca-has-health-it-startups-pivoting-away-from-providers Fri, 26 May 2017 10:05:55 CDT Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: Payer Patients, providers and payers are expected to feel the brunt of the GOP's reform bill. But potential reforms are also generating uncertainty that is trickling down to the health IT industry. Smaller digital health startups are pivoting toward consumers because the uncertainty surrounding an ACA repeal has left providers hesitant to invest in new technology. AHCA uncertainty has some health IT startups drifting away from providers http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/ahca-has-health-it-startups-pivoting-away-from-providers http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/ahca-has-health-it-startups-pivoting-away-from-providers Fri, 26 May 2017 10:05:55 CDT Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: It Patients, providers and payers are expected to feel the brunt of the GOP's reform bill. But potential reforms are also generating uncertainty that is trickling down to the health IT industry. Smaller digital health startups are pivoting toward consumers because the uncertainty surrounding an ACA repeal has left providers hesitant to invest in new technology. AHCA uncertainty has some health IT startups drifting away from providers http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/ahca-has-health-it-startups-pivoting-away-from-providers http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/ahca-has-health-it-startups-pivoting-away-from-providers Fri, 26 May 2017 10:05:55 CDT Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Patients, providers and payers are expected to feel the brunt of the GOP's reform bill. But potential reforms are also generating uncertainty that is trickling down to the health IT industry. Smaller digital health startups are pivoting toward consumers because the uncertainty surrounding an ACA repeal has left providers hesitant to invest in new technology. AHCA uncertainty has some health IT startups drifting away from providers http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/ahca-has-health-it-startups-pivoting-away-from-providers http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/ahca-has-health-it-startups-pivoting-away-from-providers Fri, 26 May 2017 10:05:55 CDT Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: It Patients, providers and payers are expected to feel the brunt of the GOP's reform bill. But potential reforms are also generating uncertainty that is trickling down to the health IT industry. Smaller digital health startups are pivoting toward consumers because the uncertainty surrounding an ACA repeal has left providers hesitant to invest in new technology. 4 tips for specialty practices on referrals and payer mix http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/4-tips-for-specialty-practices-referrals-and-payer-mix http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/4-tips-for-specialty-practices-referrals-and-payer-mix Fri, 26 May 2017 09:38:04 CDT Joanne Finnegan at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Most "ologist" practices—specialists such as urologists, dermatologists, and endocrinologists—depend on two sources for their patients: referrals from primary care providers and insurance networks. Therefore, it makes sense to pay close attention to both, tracking and nurturing those resources for referrals. Conservative governors taking up Trump challenge to rework Medicaid; Wisconsin drug testing plan passes hurdle http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/conservative-governors-taking-up-trump-s-challenge-to-rework-medicaid http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/conservative-governors-taking-up-trump-s-challenge-to-rework-medicaid Fri, 26 May 2017 09:30:41 CDT Gienna Shaw at FierceHealthcare: Payer At the federal level, the fate of Medicaid is uncertain—President Donald Trump's proposed budget cuts have drawn fire and the GOP’s plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act hasn’t received a warm welcome in the Senate, to say the least. But at the state level, conservative governors are starting to rework Medicaid programs on their own. The payer-provider divide over Republicans' AHCA plans http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/payers-insurance-industry-groups-quiet-cbo-score http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/payers-insurance-industry-groups-quiet-cbo-score Fri, 26 May 2017 09:06:53 CDT Paige Minemyer at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Insurers and insurance executives have been mostly mum on the American Health Care Act and its CBO score, a response that stands in stark contrast to reactions from providers and other industry groups. But healthcare leaders have plenty to say. House wellness bill would limit precision medicine initiatives, policy researchers say http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/privacy-security/house-wellness-bill-would-limit-precision-medicine-research-policy-researchers-say http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/privacy-security/house-wellness-bill-would-limit-precision-medicine-research-policy-researchers-say Fri, 26 May 2017 09:04:15 CDT Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: It A House bill that would allow wellness programs access to genetic data would create problems for a precision medicine initiative that aims to voluntarily collect health information from 1 million people. The bill has already been widely criticized for allowing employers to punish employees who don’t participate in wellness programs, but it also has implications for major precision medicine research efforts that rely on patients to share genetic data. House wellness bill would limit precision medicine initiatives, policy researchers say http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/privacy-security/house-wellness-bill-would-limit-precision-medicine-research-policy-researchers-say http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/privacy-security/house-wellness-bill-would-limit-precision-medicine-research-policy-researchers-say Fri, 26 May 2017 09:04:15 CDT Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: It A House bill that would allow wellness programs access to genetic data would create problems for a precision medicine initiative that aims to voluntarily collect health information from 1 million people. The bill has already been widely criticized for allowing employers to punish employees who don’t participate in wellness programs, but it also has implications for major precision medicine research efforts that rely on patients to share genetic data. House wellness bill would limit precision medicine initiatives, policy researchers say http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/privacy-security/house-wellness-bill-would-limit-precision-medicine-research-policy-researchers-say http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/privacy-security/house-wellness-bill-would-limit-precision-medicine-research-policy-researchers-say Fri, 26 May 2017 09:04:15 CDT Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare A House bill that would allow wellness programs access to genetic data would create problems for a precision medicine initiative that aims to voluntarily collect health information from 1 million people. The bill has already been widely criticized for allowing employers to punish employees who don’t participate in wellness programs, but it also has implications for major precision medicine research efforts that rely on patients to share genetic data. House wellness bill would limit precision medicine initiatives, policy researchers say http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/privacy-security/house-wellness-bill-would-limit-precision-medicine-research-policy-researchers-say http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/privacy-security/house-wellness-bill-would-limit-precision-medicine-research-policy-researchers-say Fri, 26 May 2017 09:04:15 CDT Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: Payer A House bill that would allow wellness programs access to genetic data would create problems for a precision medicine initiative that aims to voluntarily collect health information from 1 million people. The bill has already been widely criticized for allowing employers to punish employees who don’t participate in wellness programs, but it also has implications for major precision medicine research efforts that rely on patients to share genetic data. Patient-centric approach yields same-day discharge after knee, hip replacements http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/healthcare/patient-centric-approach-yields-same-day-discharge-after-knee-hip-replacements http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/healthcare/patient-centric-approach-yields-same-day-discharge-after-knee-hip-replacements Fri, 26 May 2017 05:27:21 CDT Matt Kuhrt at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Healthcare delivery that looks smooth and efficient from a provider’s perspective often winds up looking like a huge waste of time for patients. Buffalo doctors, insurers say CPC+ program will help boost finances, care access and ease physician shortage http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/buffalo-doctors-insurers-welcome-expansion-cpc-program-into-their-area http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/buffalo-doctors-insurers-welcome-expansion-cpc-program-into-their-area Thu, 25 May 2017 16:16:29 CDT Joanne Finnegan at FierceHealthcare: Payer Doctors and nurses welcomed news that the government is expanding its Medicare pilot primary care program into the Greater Buffalo area of New York. The Comprehensive Primary Care Plus (CPC+) model is expected to give many Buffalo-area medical practices a financial boost and provide patients with greater access to healthcare. Buffalo doctors, insurers say CPC+ program will help boost finances, care access and ease physician shortage http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/buffalo-doctors-insurers-welcome-expansion-cpc-program-into-their-area http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/buffalo-doctors-insurers-welcome-expansion-cpc-program-into-their-area Thu, 25 May 2017 16:16:29 CDT Joanne Finnegan at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Doctors and nurses welcomed news that the government is expanding its Medicare pilot primary care program into the Greater Buffalo area of New York. The Comprehensive Primary Care Plus (CPC+) model is expected to give many Buffalo-area medical practices a financial boost and provide patients with greater access to healthcare. AHA, NRHA lead calls for more federal support to expand broadband to rural health providers http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/aha-payers-and-providers-want-more-federal-support-to-expand-broadband-to-rural-health http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/aha-payers-and-providers-want-more-federal-support-to-expand-broadband-to-rural-health Thu, 25 May 2017 15:31:58 CDT Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: Payer Healthcare providers, payers and two large healthcare associations want more federal funding to improve high-speed internet access that will support cost-saving telehealth and digital health initiatives. In letters to the Federal Communications Commission, both the American Hospital Association (AHA) and the National Rural Health Association (NRHA) urged the agency to increase the annual funding limits and make the grant process less burdensome. AHA, NRHA lead calls for more federal support to expand broadband to rural health providers http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/aha-payers-and-providers-want-more-federal-support-to-expand-broadband-to-rural-health http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/aha-payers-and-providers-want-more-federal-support-to-expand-broadband-to-rural-health Thu, 25 May 2017 15:31:58 CDT Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: It Healthcare providers, payers and two large healthcare associations want more federal funding to improve high-speed internet access that will support cost-saving telehealth and digital health initiatives. In letters to the Federal Communications Commission, both the American Hospital Association (AHA) and the National Rural Health Association (NRHA) urged the agency to increase the annual funding limits and make the grant process less burdensome. AHA, NRHA lead calls for more federal support to expand broadband to rural health providers http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/aha-payers-and-providers-want-more-federal-support-to-expand-broadband-to-rural-health http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/aha-payers-and-providers-want-more-federal-support-to-expand-broadband-to-rural-health Thu, 25 May 2017 15:31:58 CDT Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Healthcare providers, payers and two large healthcare associations want more federal funding to improve high-speed internet access that will support cost-saving telehealth and digital health initiatives. In letters to the Federal Communications Commission, both the American Hospital Association (AHA) and the National Rural Health Association (NRHA) urged the agency to increase the annual funding limits and make the grant process less burdensome. AHA, NRHA lead calls for more federal support to expand broadband to rural health providers http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/aha-payers-and-providers-want-more-federal-support-to-expand-broadband-to-rural-health http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/aha-payers-and-providers-want-more-federal-support-to-expand-broadband-to-rural-health Thu, 25 May 2017 15:31:58 CDT Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: It Healthcare providers, payers and two large healthcare associations want more federal funding to improve high-speed internet access that will support cost-saving telehealth and digital health initiatives. In letters to the Federal Communications Commission, both the American Hospital Association (AHA) and the National Rural Health Association (NRHA) urged the agency to increase the annual funding limits and make the grant process less burdensome. The submarine effect: Cerner pres says DoD modernization benefits all customers http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/submarine-effect-cerner-pres-says-dod-modernization-benefits-all-customers http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/submarine-effect-cerner-pres-says-dod-modernization-benefits-all-customers Thu, 25 May 2017 12:16:21 CDT walmeida at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy Calling Cerner’s project to modernize the U.S. Defense Department’s EHR a “resounding success,” Cerner President Zane Burke said that the work also helps the rest of its customers — and he pointed to submarines and cybersecurity in particular. “The things we’re doing around security, for instance, the cybersecurity pieces for the Department of Defense benefit our entire client base,” Burke said during Cerner’s annual shareholder meeting on Wednesday. Regarding submarines, Cerner has created new ways to handle what Burke called a ‘sometimes connected’ approach, which is distinct from hospitals that are always connected, specifically when it comes to resyncing those apps and data once the submarine connects again. That same approach and technology can benefit rural providers and home care specialists that are often in regions or houses with no cell phone connectivity, he said. “How do those applications resync? How do we make our applications simplified so people can do the support on a submarine?” Burke said. “That all helps our current client base but also our competitiveness overall.” Burke said that after having gone live with the first DoD pilot in February, there are three more pilot sites planned for the summer and early fall. “After that point in time there is the potential scope to attack all of the Department of Defense so with success it will let out the remainder of the contract, which includes 55 hospitals, 350 clinics and the theater of care across all of the defense department,” he said. Burke also mentioned other potential federal contracts, such as The Veterans Affairs Department and the Coast Guard both needing new EHRs. “My comment there is we just really need to keep doing good work for the Department of Defense and we will be well-served in those other cases,” Burke said.  Twitter: SullyHIT Email the writer: tom.sullivan@himssmedia.com Like Healthcare IT News on Facebook and LinkedIn Disable Auto Tagging: 

Calling Cerner’s project to modernize the U.S. Defense Department’s EHR a “resounding success,” Cerner President Zane Burke said that the work also helps the rest of its customers — and he pointed to submarines and cybersecurity in particular.

“The things we’re doing around security, for instance, the cybersecurity pieces for the Department of Defense benefit our entire client base,” Burke said during Cerner’s annual shareholder meeting on Wednesday.

Regarding submarines, Cerner has created new ways to handle what Burke called a ‘sometimes connected’ approach, which is distinct from hospitals that are always connected, specifically when it comes to resyncing those apps and data once the submarine connects again.

That same approach and technology can benefit rural providers and home care specialists that are often in regions or houses with no cell phone connectivity, he said.

“How do those applications resync? How do we make our applications simplified so people can do the support on a submarine?” Burke said. “That all helps our current client base but also our competitiveness overall.”

Burke said that after having gone live with the first DoD pilot in February, there are three more pilot sites planned for the summer and early fall.

“After that point in time there is the potential scope to attack all of the Department of Defense so with success it will let out the remainder of the contract, which includes 55 hospitals, 350 clinics and the theater of care across all of the defense department,” he said.

Burke also mentioned other potential federal contracts, such as The Veterans Affairs Department and the Coast Guard both needing new EHRs.

“My comment there is we just really need to keep doing good work for the Department of Defense and we will be well-served in those other cases,” Burke said. 

Twitter: SullyHIT
Email the writer: tom.sullivan@himssmedia.com


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Congressional Budget Office review of American Health Care Act draws concern from industry insiders http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/congressional-budget-office-review-american-health-care-act-draws-concern-industry-insiders http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/congressional-budget-office-review-american-health-care-act-draws-concern-industry-insiders Thu, 25 May 2017 12:00:08 CDT walmeida at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy The Congressional Budget Office's evaluation of the American Health Care Act, the GOP-sponsored healthcare overhaul recently passed by the House, has drawn concern from industry insiders worried that both patients and the healthcare industry would suffer if the bill passes the Senate in its current form. The CBO said Wednesday that the AHCA would reduce federal deficits by $119 billion over the coming decade, but at the expense of 23 million more uninsured Americans by 2026. Shawn Yates, director of product management for Ontario Systems, which publishes software to help hospitals manage the receivables process, is particularly concerned about the cut in Medicare funding. The plan would cut Medicaid funding by about $834 billion. [Also: Numbers of uninsured would increase by 23M under AHCA, CBO says] Yates said those Medicare cuts would effectively push the program to a per capita basis, which he said would drive people into the ranks of the uninsured, as evidenced by states who have already taken a similar approach. "The administration is reinvesting that money on the military, tax cuts for corporations and other groups," said Yates. "It's the classic trickle-down economics theory that we've seen in the past. We'll see if it works this time." Of course, the CBO estimates are based on the effects of the bill if is passes through the Senate relatively unaltered, which Yates said is unlikely, given the higher chamber has historically been more responsive to public opinion. "The house kind of acted in this vacuum, with the Freedom Caucus, the conservative Republicans and the Democrats," said Yates. "The Senate to me seems to be more cognizant of their constituents, and I think what you're going to see is some of the more popular provisions of the Affordable Care Act will be kept." One of the provisions of the ACA likely to survive, said Yates, is coverage for pre-existing conditions, although there may be some caveats to that. A person would hypothetically be required to maintain continuous coverage, or face being charged with higher rates. The health exchanges, said Yates, will likely disappear. What they'll be replaced with is anybody's guess. "So the way the exchanges work is that you have the healthy insured people in with the sicker people, and it creates a balance to where insurers can at least break even or make a little money, and the exchanges can survive," said Yates. "You take away their revenue source and then you just have the sicker population, and the insurance companies just can't survive." On Wednesday, Nancy LeaMond, executive vice president of the AARP, released a statement highly critical of the AHCA, saying provisions such as an age tax and weakened protections for those with pre-existing conditions would disproportionately target older and sicker Americans. She said the bill would hurt older Americans by decreasing the solvency of Medicare, hiking costs, and giving tax breaks to large drug companies and health insurance companies. According to the CBO, premiums for a 64-year-old earning $25,500 a year would increase by $14,400 by 2026. "After facing a massive premium increase as we age, the bill weakens Medicare funding, opening the door to turning Medicare into a voucher program that shifts costs for prescriptions and insurance to seniors, at the same time as it gives big drug and insurance companies and other special interests a sweetheart deal," said LeaMond. Yates said the bill could very well become deadlocked in the Senate, although that would create its own fallout: Congress can still defund cost sharing and make cuts to Medicaid. Either way, he said, the ACA is unlikely to survive more than couple of years. Hospitals, he said, "will have to evaluate what's the revenue reduction they can expect over the next five years. You have to beef up your financial system processes, and a lot of that is already happening. They're going to have to find a way to do more with less. This is absolutely critical to what they do. There won't be investments in tons of new technology -- more of a focus on population health initiatives." "The bet from the administration that I can see is, 'We're going to cut all this and reinvest it on the economy, and more people will have insurance,'" said Yates. "But we've been down that path before. We'll have to see." Twitter: @JELagasse Disable Auto Tagging: 

The Congressional Budget Office's evaluation of the American Health Care Act, the GOP-sponsored healthcare overhaul recently passed by the House, has drawn concern from industry insiders worried that both patients and the healthcare industry would suffer if the bill passes the Senate in its current form.

The CBO said Wednesday that the AHCA would reduce federal deficits by $119 billion over the coming decade, but at the expense of 23 million more uninsured Americans by 2026.

Shawn Yates, director of product management for Ontario Systems, which publishes software to help hospitals manage the receivables process, is particularly concerned about the cut in Medicare funding. The plan would cut Medicaid funding by about $834 billion.

[Also: Numbers of uninsured would increase by 23M under AHCA, CBO says]

Yates said those Medicare cuts would effectively push the program to a per capita basis, which he said would drive people into the ranks of the uninsured, as evidenced by states who have already taken a similar approach.

"The administration is reinvesting that money on the military, tax cuts for corporations and other groups," said Yates. "It's the classic trickle-down economics theory that we've seen in the past. We'll see if it works this time."

Of course, the CBO estimates are based on the effects of the bill if is passes through the Senate relatively unaltered, which Yates said is unlikely, given the higher chamber has historically been more responsive to public opinion.

"The house kind of acted in this vacuum, with the Freedom Caucus, the conservative Republicans and the Democrats," said Yates. "The Senate to me seems to be more cognizant of their constituents, and I think what you're going to see is some of the more popular provisions of the Affordable Care Act will be kept."

One of the provisions of the ACA likely to survive, said Yates, is coverage for pre-existing conditions, although there may be some caveats to that. A person would hypothetically be required to maintain continuous coverage, or face being charged with higher rates.

The health exchanges, said Yates, will likely disappear. What they'll be replaced with is anybody's guess.

"So the way the exchanges work is that you have the healthy insured people in with the sicker people, and it creates a balance to where insurers can at least break even or make a little money, and the exchanges can survive," said Yates. "You take away their revenue source and then you just have the sicker population, and the insurance companies just can't survive."

On Wednesday, Nancy LeaMond, executive vice president of the AARP, released a statement highly critical of the AHCA, saying provisions such as an age tax and weakened protections for those with pre-existing conditions would disproportionately target older and sicker Americans.

She said the bill would hurt older Americans by decreasing the solvency of Medicare, hiking costs, and giving tax breaks to large drug companies and health insurance companies.

According to the CBO, premiums for a 64-year-old earning $25,500 a year would increase by $14,400 by 2026.

"After facing a massive premium increase as we age, the bill weakens Medicare funding, opening the door to turning Medicare into a voucher program that shifts costs for prescriptions and insurance to seniors, at the same time as it gives big drug and insurance companies and other special interests a sweetheart deal," said LeaMond.

Yates said the bill could very well become deadlocked in the Senate, although that would create its own fallout: Congress can still defund cost sharing and make cuts to Medicaid. Either way, he said, the ACA is unlikely to survive more than couple of years.

Hospitals, he said, "will have to evaluate what's the revenue reduction they can expect over the next five years. You have to beef up your financial system processes, and a lot of that is already happening. They're going to have to find a way to do more with less. This is absolutely critical to what they do. There won't be investments in tons of new technology -- more of a focus on population health initiatives."

"The bet from the administration that I can see is, 'We're going to cut all this and reinvest it on the economy, and more people will have insurance,'" said Yates. "But we've been down that path before. We'll have to see."

Twitter: @JELagasse

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OIG blasts VA over IT security controls, calls standards weak, unsafe http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/oig-blasts-va-over-it-security-controls-calls-standards-weak-unsafe http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/oig-blasts-va-over-it-security-controls-calls-standards-weak-unsafe Thu, 25 May 2017 11:10:46 CDT walmeida at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy The Office of the Inspector General this week scolded the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs over its IT security controls during a House Committee on Veterans Affairs’ Financial Management hearing on Wednesday. OIG found weaknesses in configuration management, access controls, security management and contingency planning. Specifically, officials found VA had untimely patching of security vulnerability mitigation and inconsistent enforcement of password standards. [Also: VA taps DSS for mobile patient scheduling tool] “This is a repeat finding that our contract auditors have reported since Fiscal Year 2000,” OIG Deputy Assistant Inspector General for Audits and Evaluations Nicholas Dahl said in his opening statement. “Without good information technology security controls, VA’s financial information may not be safe in terms of confidentiality, integrity and availability.” This isn’t the first time the VA was scorned for its IT oversight. In March, the VA landed on the U.S. Government Accountability Office high-risk list again, for the third year in a row. It was added to the list in 2015 for the first time due to GAO’s concerns with the “VA’s ability to ensure the timeliness, cost-effectiveness, quality and safety of the care provided to veterans,” GAO Director of Health Care Team Debra Draper said during a U.S. Senate Committee on Veterans’ Affairs meeting in March. [Also: OIG stings Virginia for failing to secure Medicaid data] “As I noted at the time of their high-risk designation in 2015, VA had more than 100 open GAO recommendations related to healthcare,” Draper said. “Seventy-four new recommendations have been added since then; currently, there are still more than 100 open recommendations. And about a quarter of these have been open for three to four years.” During the same meeting, VA Inspector General Michael Missal condemned the VA’s “exceedingly slow pace of progress.” VA Secretary Shulkin told the House Committee on Veterans Affairs during a Wednesday morning meeting that modernization is a top priority of the agency, which he believes will create a “highly integrated, high-performance system.”   Twitter: @JessieFDavis Email the writer: jessica.davis@himssmedia.com Like Healthcare IT News on Facebook and LinkedIn Disable Auto Tagging: 

The Office of the Inspector General this week scolded the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs over its IT security controls during a House Committee on Veterans Affairs’ Financial Management hearing on Wednesday.

OIG found weaknesses in configuration management, access controls, security management and contingency planning. Specifically, officials found VA had untimely patching of security vulnerability mitigation and inconsistent enforcement of password standards.

[Also: VA taps DSS for mobile patient scheduling tool]

“This is a repeat finding that our contract auditors have reported since Fiscal Year 2000,” OIG Deputy Assistant Inspector General for Audits and Evaluations Nicholas Dahl said in his opening statement. “Without good information technology security controls, VA’s financial information may not be safe in terms of confidentiality, integrity and availability.”

This isn’t the first time the VA was scorned for its IT oversight. In March, the VA landed on the U.S. Government Accountability Office high-risk list again, for the third year in a row.

It was added to the list in 2015 for the first time due to GAO’s concerns with the “VA’s ability to ensure the timeliness, cost-effectiveness, quality and safety of the care provided to veterans,” GAO Director of Health Care Team Debra Draper said during a U.S. Senate Committee on Veterans’ Affairs meeting in March.

[Also: OIG stings Virginia for failing to secure Medicaid data]

“As I noted at the time of their high-risk designation in 2015, VA had more than 100 open GAO recommendations related to healthcare,” Draper said. “Seventy-four new recommendations have been added since then; currently, there are still more than 100 open recommendations. And about a quarter of these have been open for three to four years.”

During the same meeting, VA Inspector General Michael Missal condemned the VA’s “exceedingly slow pace of progress.”

VA Secretary Shulkin told the House Committee on Veterans Affairs during a Wednesday morning meeting that modernization is a top priority of the agency, which he believes will create a “highly integrated, high-performance system.”
 

Twitter: @JessieFDavis
Email the writer: jessica.davis@himssmedia.com


Like Healthcare IT News on Facebook and LinkedIn

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Trump’s budget would add $313M to medical device user fees, but Congress is unlikely to follow through http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/trump-s-budget-would-increase-user-fees-for-digital-health-companies-seeking-fda http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/trump-s-budget-would-increase-user-fees-for-digital-health-companies-seeking-fda Thu, 25 May 2017 10:50:48 CDT Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: It President Donald Trump wants to increase FDA medical device user fees by more than $300 million in 2018, a move that has raised muted concern—and some bewilderment—from the digital health and medical technology industries as lawmakers prepare to vote on a new user fee reauthorization bill. Under Trump’s proposed budget, medical device user fees would jump to $439 billion in 2018, more than three times the current levels. Trump’s budget would add $313M to medical device user fees, but Congress is unlikely to follow through http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/trump-s-budget-would-increase-user-fees-for-digital-health-companies-seeking-fda http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/trump-s-budget-would-increase-user-fees-for-digital-health-companies-seeking-fda Thu, 25 May 2017 10:50:48 CDT Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: It President Donald Trump wants to increase FDA medical device user fees by more than $300 million in 2018, a move that has raised muted concern—and some bewilderment—from the digital health and medical technology industries as lawmakers prepare to vote on a new user fee reauthorization bill. Under Trump’s proposed budget, medical device user fees would jump to $439 billion in 2018, more than three times the current levels. Trump’s budget would add $313M to medical device user fees, but Congress is unlikely to follow through http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/trump-s-budget-would-increase-user-fees-for-digital-health-companies-seeking-fda http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/trump-s-budget-would-increase-user-fees-for-digital-health-companies-seeking-fda Thu, 25 May 2017 10:50:48 CDT Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare President Donald Trump wants to increase FDA medical device user fees by more than $300 million in 2018, a move that has raised muted concern—and some bewilderment—from the digital health and medical technology industries as lawmakers prepare to vote on a new user fee reauthorization bill. Under Trump’s proposed budget, medical device user fees would jump to $439 billion in 2018, more than three times the current levels. Physician leaders: 4 keys to MACRA success http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/4-keys-healthcare-leaders-agree-are-essential-for-macra-success http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/4-keys-healthcare-leaders-agree-are-essential-for-macra-success Thu, 25 May 2017 10:43:52 CDT Joanne Finnegan at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare MACRA is changing healthcare with a new payment system that rewards participating Medicare doctors for the quality of outcomes they demonstrate. The program will present challenges for physician practices, Anne Phelps, principal and U.S. healthcare regulatory leader at Deloitte, told FierceHealthcare. Hospital study shows how bacteria spreads among patients, staff, surfaces http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/healthcare/study-shows-dynamics-bacterial-colonization-a-hospital-setting http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/healthcare/study-shows-dynamics-bacterial-colonization-a-hospital-setting Thu, 25 May 2017 10:19:11 CDT Matt Kuhrt at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare A new study that mapped the spread of bacteria in a hospital’s first year of existence will help healthcare leaders better understand the dynamics of a hospital’s microbiome and actions they can take to decrease harmful contact. CBO details AHCA impact on marketplace premiums; industry calls on Senate to preserve ACA coverage gains http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/aca/cbo-details-how-ahca-could-affect-individual-marketplace-premiums-industry-groups-call-senate http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/aca/cbo-details-how-ahca-could-affect-individual-marketplace-premiums-industry-groups-call-senate Thu, 25 May 2017 10:08:06 CDT Paige Minemyer at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Though the Congressional Budget Office projects that millions could lose their insurance coverage under the American Health Care Act, Republican leaders are focusing on the good news in the report: deficit reductions and lower premiums. Meanwhile, industry groups say those potential positives don't change their concerns about the costs of so many Americans losing their insurance. CBO details AHCA impact on marketplace premiums; industry calls on Senate to preserve ACA coverage gains http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/aca/cbo-details-how-ahca-could-affect-individual-marketplace-premiums-industry-groups-call-senate http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/aca/cbo-details-how-ahca-could-affect-individual-marketplace-premiums-industry-groups-call-senate Thu, 25 May 2017 10:08:06 CDT Paige Minemyer at FierceHealthcare: Payer Though the Congressional Budget Office projects that millions could lose their insurance coverage under the American Health Care Act, Republican leaders are focusing on the good news in the report: deficit reductions and lower premiums. Meanwhile, industry groups say those potential positives don't change their concerns about the costs of so many Americans losing their insurance. Texas psychiatrist latest person convicted in $158M Riverside Medicare fraud scheme http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/texas-psychiatrist-latest-person-convicted-158-million-medicare-fraud-scheme http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/texas-psychiatrist-latest-person-convicted-158-million-medicare-fraud-scheme Thu, 25 May 2017 09:52:13 CDT Joanne Finnegan at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare A Houston-area psychiatrist is the latest person convicted for his role in a $158 million Medicare fraud scheme in which patients were admitted into intensive psychiatric programs. After a five-day trial, Riaz Mazcuri, 65, of Harris County, Texas, was convicted by a federal jury of one count of conspiracy to commit healthcare fraud and five counts of healthcare fraud, according to an announcement from the U.S. Department of Justice. Texas psychiatrist latest person convicted in $158M Riverside Medicare fraud scheme http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/texas-psychiatrist-latest-person-convicted-158-million-medicare-fraud-scheme http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/texas-psychiatrist-latest-person-convicted-158-million-medicare-fraud-scheme Thu, 25 May 2017 09:52:13 CDT Joanne Finnegan at FierceHealthcare: Payer A Houston-area psychiatrist is the latest person convicted for his role in a $158 million Medicare fraud scheme in which patients were admitted into intensive psychiatric programs. After a five-day trial, Riaz Mazcuri, 65, of Harris County, Texas, was convicted by a federal jury of one count of conspiracy to commit healthcare fraud and five counts of healthcare fraud, according to an announcement from the U.S. Department of Justice. Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Kansas City exits exchanges, leaving some with no health plan options http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/aca/blue-cross-and-blue-shield-kansas-city-exits-exchanges-leaving-some-no-health-plan-options http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/aca/blue-cross-and-blue-shield-kansas-city-exits-exchanges-leaving-some-no-health-plan-options Thu, 25 May 2017 09:33:19 CDT Gienna Shaw at FierceHealthcare: Payer Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Kansas City announced it will not offer individual Affordable Care Act exchange plans in its 32-county service area in Kansas and Missouri in 2018. That leaves about 19,000 people with no exchange plan choices unless another insurer steps in. MGH doctor: To make EHRs less burdensome, focus on value-based payments http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/ehr/mgh-doc-to-make-ehrs-less-burdensome-focus-value-based-payments http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/ehr/mgh-doc-to-make-ehrs-less-burdensome-focus-value-based-payments Thu, 25 May 2017 09:27:25 CDT Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: It Widespread implementation of EHRs has left the majority of physicians spending more time at a keyboard than with patients. A massive shift toward paying for value over volume could relieve that burden. Although physician practices and hospitals have turned to several short-term solutions, a significant shift toward value-based payments will force EHRs to evolve to a more patient-centered tool. MGH doctor: To make EHRs less burdensome, focus on value-based payments http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/ehr/mgh-doc-to-make-ehrs-less-burdensome-focus-value-based-payments http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/ehr/mgh-doc-to-make-ehrs-less-burdensome-focus-value-based-payments Thu, 25 May 2017 09:27:25 CDT Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: It Widespread implementation of EHRs has left the majority of physicians spending more time at a keyboard than with patients. A massive shift toward paying for value over volume could relieve that burden. Although physician practices and hospitals have turned to several short-term solutions, a significant shift toward value-based payments will force EHRs to evolve to a more patient-centered tool.