MedClimate Health News Daily http://medclimate.com/feed en-us Copyright MedClimate, Inc2018 Psychotherapeutic intervention shows promise for treating depression in preschool-aged children http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/psychotherapeutic-intervention-shows-promise-treating-depression-preschool-aged-children http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/psychotherapeutic-intervention-shows-promise-treating-depression-preschool-aged-children Wed, 20 Jun 2018 12:00:00 CDT NIH News Release PCIT-ED is one of the first psychotherapeutic treatments to target early childhood depression. ]]> Amazon, Berkshire Hathaway and JPMorgan Chase appoint CEO for healthcare venture http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/hospitals-health-systems/amazon-berkshire-hathaway-and-jpmorgan-chase-appoint-ceo-for-healthcare?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/hospitals-health-systems/amazon-berkshire-hathaway-and-jpmorgan-chase-appoint-ceo-for-healthcare?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Wed, 20 Jun 2018 09:13:11 CDT Tina Reed at FierceHealthcare: Payer Atul Gawande, M.D., was officially named chief executive officer of the three-way partnership's newly formed company to address U.S. employee healthcare. VA tackles interoperability, massive data stores with open FHIR API project http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/va-tackles-interoperability-massive-data-stores-open-fhir-api-project http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/va-tackles-interoperability-massive-data-stores-open-fhir-api-project Tue, 19 Jun 2018 15:15:04 CDT walmeida at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy BOSTON -- The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs over the last year has made a pointed shift to modernize the agency: First with the announcement to replace its legacy EHR with Cerner in June 2017 and next with several platforms to boost transparency and telemedicine efforts. But the launch of its open API project in March – once dubbed Lighthouse and now called the VA API Developer Sandbox – is zeroed in on interoperability and modernization. Led by University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Chief Innovation Officer Rasu Shrestha, the project has grown with dozens of other hospitals joining the effort. To Ken Rubin, director of standards and interoperability for the Veterans Health Affairs Office of Knowledge Based Systems, the VA has some pretty tremendous data challenges that it hopes the API project and FHIR can tackle. [Also: FHIR and Open APIs are here to stay - but are they ready for prime time?] For each patient, the VA can have up to 150 years of data, Rubin explained. But another issue is the increase of consumer-based and direct care and the expansion of care for veterans into the private sector. “About 50 percent of veterans’ care happens within the VA. Those numbers vary, but the bottom line is that there’s a huge amount of care happening outside the VA,” Rubin said at HL7’s DevDays on Tuesday. “So even if we solve interoperability within the VA, we’ve only solved half of the problem,” he added. The VA also is working to be self-organizing when it comes to data, as it automates and transitions its workflows. Especially as there’s “a huge spectrum of data that comes back to the VA” from the private sector, the agency needs to do a better job of orchestrating that data transfer and ensuring the next step of care “can pick up and carry that ball forward.” Rubin also expressed concern about the idea that FHIR is a cure-all for interoperability. While it’s great for getting data on an individual patient, it’s limited when it comes to aggregating data from the system to determine a set of behaviors. “FHIR is a great tool, but it’s not the only tool,” Rubin said. “Don’t use FHIR as a hammer to pound screws. Use FHIR in areas where it needs to grow.” “It’s not about picking a version: The VA will always have to support other systems until there’s ubiquity across the sector,” Rubin added. “Bear that in mind: We’re only addressing a piece of the puzzle.” IT is often seen as a drag to productivity, which is a problem the VA is trying to solve by leaning on private sector developers and providers to share data and develop apps to make that data usable, Rubin explained. “We can’t do it alone. We want to engage the ecosystem, that’s why we’re here. We believe in where FHIR is going and it’s an essential tool in the toolbox,” Rubin said. “Availability of data is critically important, but the body of medical data grows every month – you won’t be able to keep pace. Knowledge is critically important to data and processing interoperability.” Twitter: @JessieFDavis Email the writer: jessica.davis@himssmedia.com Primary Topic: AnalyticsAdditional Topics: AnalyticsDataPolicyInteroperabilityTechnologyTechnologyTelehealthTelehealthTechnologyPolicySpecific Terms: Mobile Health ITCustom Tags: AnalyticsInteroperabilityMobile Health ITTelehealthDisable Auto Tagging: Short Headline: VA tackles interoperability with open FHIR API projectNewsletter hed: VA tackles interoperability, massive data stores with open FHIR API projectNewsletter teaser: Veterans Health Affairs’ director of standards and interoperability warns that FHIR is not a cure all, just one valuable asset in a tech toolbox.HOT @HIMSS: Featured Decision Content: 

BOSTON -- The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs over the last year has made a pointed shift to modernize the agency: First with the announcement to replace its legacy EHR with Cerner in June 2017 and next with several platforms to boost transparency and telemedicine efforts.

But the launch of its open API project in March – once dubbed Lighthouse and now called the VA API Developer Sandbox – is zeroed in on interoperability and modernization. Led by University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Chief Innovation Officer Rasu Shrestha, the project has grown with dozens of other hospitals joining the effort.

To Ken Rubin, director of standards and interoperability for the Veterans Health Affairs Office of Knowledge Based Systems, the VA has some pretty tremendous data challenges that it hopes the API project and FHIR can tackle.

[Also: FHIR and Open APIs are here to stay - but are they ready for prime time?]

For each patient, the VA can have up to 150 years of data, Rubin explained. But another issue is the increase of consumer-based and direct care and the expansion of care for veterans into the private sector.

“About 50 percent of veterans’ care happens within the VA. Those numbers vary, but the bottom line is that there’s a huge amount of care happening outside the VA,” Rubin said at HL7’s DevDays on Tuesday.

“So even if we solve interoperability within the VA, we’ve only solved half of the problem,” he added.

The VA also is working to be self-organizing when it comes to data, as it automates and transitions its workflows. Especially as there’s “a huge spectrum of data that comes back to the VA” from the private sector, the agency needs to do a better job of orchestrating that data transfer and ensuring the next step of care “can pick up and carry that ball forward.”

Rubin also expressed concern about the idea that FHIR is a cure-all for interoperability. While it’s great for getting data on an individual patient, it’s limited when it comes to aggregating data from the system to determine a set of behaviors.

“FHIR is a great tool, but it’s not the only tool,” Rubin said. “Don’t use FHIR as a hammer to pound screws. Use FHIR in areas where it needs to grow.”

“It’s not about picking a version: The VA will always have to support other systems until there’s ubiquity across the sector,” Rubin added. “Bear that in mind: We’re only addressing a piece of the puzzle.”

IT is often seen as a drag to productivity, which is a problem the VA is trying to solve by leaning on private sector developers and providers to share data and develop apps to make that data usable, Rubin explained.

“We can’t do it alone. We want to engage the ecosystem, that’s why we’re here. We believe in where FHIR is going and it’s an essential tool in the toolbox,” Rubin said. “Availability of data is critically important, but the body of medical data grows every month – you won’t be able to keep pace. Knowledge is critically important to data and processing interoperability.”

Twitter: @JessieFDavis
Email the writer: jessica.davis@himssmedia.com

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VA tackles interoperability with open FHIR API project
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Veterans Health Affairs’ director of standards and interoperability warns that FHIR is not a cure all, just one valuable asset in a tech toolbox.
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MD Anderson to pay $4.3 million settlement with OCR for HIPAA violations http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/md-anderson-pay-43-million-settlement-ocr-hipaa-violations http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/md-anderson-pay-43-million-settlement-ocr-hipaa-violations Tue, 19 Jun 2018 14:12:42 CDT walmeida at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center settled with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of Civil Rights for $4,348,000 for HIPAA violations, which was upheld by the HHS administrative law judge. The fine is the fourth largest monetary settlement with OCR. MD Anderson suffered three separate data breaches in 2012 and 2013 involving the theft of an unencrypted laptop and the loss of two USB thumb drives containing the unencrypted data of more than 33,500 patients. The OCR investigation that followed found the cancer center hadn’t updated its encryption policies since 2006. Further, a risk analysis by MD Anderson found that the lack of encryption posed a high-risk to the loss of patient data. Despite these observations, OCR officials said that MD Anderson failed to begin adopting encryption policies for patient data until 2011. Even then, it failed to encrypt its inventory of devices containing patient data between 2011 and 2013. MD Anderson officials argued that the data didn’t need to be encrypted as the patient data was for research purposes and not subject to HIPAA. Further, they said the OCR fine was “unreasonable.” But the HHS administrative law judge sided with OCR and found the penalty was reasonable, “given the gravity of [MD Anderson’s] noncompliance and the number of individuals potentially affected” and “are minuscule when compared to the respondent’s size and the volume of business that it does.” “[MD Anderson’s] dilatory conduct is shocking given the high risk to its patients resulting from the unauthorized disclosure of ePHI, a risk that respondent not only recognized but that it restated many times,” Steven Kessel, the administrative law judge, wrote in his decision. OCR Director Roger Severino said in a statement that the office is pleased the judge upheld its penalties. “It underscores the risks entities take if they fail to implement effective safeguards, such as data encryption, when required to protect sensitive patient information,” Severino added.  MD Anderson is not alone in failing to encrypt its data despite HIPAA requirements to do so.  Earlier this year, Fresenius Medical Care North America settled with OCR for $3.5 million following an OCR investigation of a string of breaches in 2013. The health system failed to encrypt health data on its devices. Twitter: @JessieFDavis Email the writer: jessica.davis@himssmedia.com Primary Topic: ComplianceAdditional Topics: PolicyMeaningful UsePolicyTechnologySecurityPolicyMeaningful UseSpecific Terms: CompliancePrivacy & SecurityComplianceCustom Tags: CompliancePrivacy & SecurityComplianceDisable Auto Tagging: Short Headline: MD Anderson to pay $4.3M for HIPAA violationsNewsletter hed: MD Anderson to pay $4.3 million settlement with OCR for HIPAA violationsNewsletter teaser: The cancer research center argued it didn’t need to encrypt its data as it was for research, but a federal judge upheld the OCR fine.HOT @HIMSS: Featured Decision Content: 

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center settled with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of Civil Rights for $4,348,000 for HIPAA violations, which was upheld by the HHS administrative law judge.

The fine is the fourth largest monetary settlement with OCR.

MD Anderson suffered three separate data breaches in 2012 and 2013 involving the theft of an unencrypted laptop and the loss of two USB thumb drives containing the unencrypted data of more than 33,500 patients.

The OCR investigation that followed found the cancer center hadn’t updated its encryption policies since 2006. Further, a risk analysis by MD Anderson found that the lack of encryption posed a high-risk to the loss of patient data.

Despite these observations, OCR officials said that MD Anderson failed to begin adopting encryption policies for patient data until 2011. Even then, it failed to encrypt its inventory of devices containing patient data between 2011 and 2013.

MD Anderson officials argued that the data didn’t need to be encrypted as the patient data was for research purposes and not subject to HIPAA. Further, they said the OCR fine was “unreasonable.”

But the HHS administrative law judge sided with OCR and found the penalty was reasonable, “given the gravity of [MD Anderson’s] noncompliance and the number of individuals potentially affected” and “are minuscule when compared to the respondent’s size and the volume of business that it does.”

“[MD Anderson’s] dilatory conduct is shocking given the high risk to its patients resulting from the unauthorized disclosure of ePHI, a risk that respondent not only recognized but that it restated many times,” Steven Kessel, the administrative law judge, wrote in his decision.

OCR Director Roger Severino said in a statement that the office is pleased the judge upheld its penalties. “It underscores the risks entities take if they fail to implement effective safeguards, such as data encryption, when required to protect sensitive patient information,” Severino added. 

MD Anderson is not alone in failing to encrypt its data despite HIPAA requirements to do so. 

Earlier this year, Fresenius Medical Care North America settled with OCR for $3.5 million following an OCR investigation of a string of breaches in 2013. The health system failed to encrypt health data on its devices.

Twitter: @JessieFDavis
Email the writer: jessica.davis@himssmedia.com

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MD Anderson to pay $4.3M for HIPAA violations
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MD Anderson to pay $4.3 million settlement with OCR for HIPAA violations
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The cancer research center argued it didn’t need to encrypt its data as it was for research, but a federal judge upheld the OCR fine.
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MedPAC: Medicare's readmission program not causing increase in observation stays  http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/medpac-medicare-s-readmission-program-not-causing-increase-observation-stays?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/medpac-medicare-s-readmission-program-not-causing-increase-observation-stays?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Tue, 19 Jun 2018 13:07:42 CDT Paige Minemyer at FierceHealthcare: Payer CMS' readmissions reduction program isn't responsible for an uptick in observation stays, according to MedPAC. The group also reiterated its support for cutting payments to free-standing emergency departments. Methadone and buprenorphine reduce risk of death after opioid overdose http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/methadone-buprenorphine-reduce-risk-death-after-opioid-overdose http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/methadone-buprenorphine-reduce-risk-death-after-opioid-overdose Tue, 19 Jun 2018 12:15:00 CDT NIH News Release NIH research confirms effective treatments for opioid use disorder are underutilized. ]]> National Business Group on Health issues new recommendations for pushing PBMs on opioids http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/hospitals-health-systems/national-business-group-health-issues-guidelines-for-pushing-pbm-s-opioids?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/hospitals-health-systems/national-business-group-health-issues-guidelines-for-pushing-pbm-s-opioids?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Tue, 19 Jun 2018 10:30:00 CDT Tina Reed at FierceHealthcare: Payer The National Business Group on Health recommended that employers discuss opioid use for pain management with their health plans and pharmacy benefit managers. Conservatives unveil ACA repeal plan as bipartisan governors rally around pre-existing condition protections http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/conversative-groups-to-release-aca-repeal-plan-as-bipartisan-governors-rally-around-pre?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/conversative-groups-to-release-aca-repeal-plan-as-bipartisan-governors-rally-around-pre?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Tue, 19 Jun 2018 09:54:17 CDT Mike Stankiewicz at FierceHealthcare: Payer Only months before the critical 2018 midterm elections, conservatives are pushing for yet another attempt at repealing the Affordable Care Act, and the new proposal looks very similar to last year's Graham-Cassidy bill. As Medicaid costs soar, states try a new approach http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/as-medicaid-costs-soar-states-try-a-new-approach?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/as-medicaid-costs-soar-states-try-a-new-approach?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Mon, 18 Jun 2018 21:17:29 CDT Phil Galewitz at FierceHealthcare: Payer In order to control ever-increasing Medicaid spending, some states are taking a unique step: addressing underlying social issues related to health, such as homelessness, lack of transportation and poor nutrition. Federal judge dismisses UnitedHealth fraud suit over in-home visits, Walmart gift cards http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/federal-judge-dismisses-unitedhealth-lawsuit-over-home-visits-walmart-gifts-cards?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/federal-judge-dismisses-unitedhealth-lawsuit-over-home-visits-walmart-gifts-cards?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Mon, 18 Jun 2018 20:51:32 CDT Mike Stankiewicz at FierceHealthcare: Payer A federal judge has dismissed a lawsuit against UnitedHealthcare that accused the Minnesota-based insurer of false claims and violations of the Anti-Kickback Statute, which stemmed from a HouseCalls visit and a $25 Walmart gift card. Anthem completes acquisition of Aspire Health months ahead of schedule http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/anthem-completes-acquisition-aspire-health-months-ahead-schedule?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/anthem-completes-acquisition-aspire-health-months-ahead-schedule?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Mon, 18 Jun 2018 10:06:23 CDT Mike Stankiewicz at FierceHealthcare: Payer Anthem's purchase of Aspire Health is a done deal, the Indianapolis-based insurer announced Monday. Completion is months ahead of schedule and the acquisition is part of an industry trend of insurers buying up providers. Patents hold clues about Apple, Amazon, Google and Microsoft plans for healthcare http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/patents-hold-clues-about-apple-amazon-google-and-microsoft-plans-healthcare http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/patents-hold-clues-about-apple-amazon-google-and-microsoft-plans-healthcare Mon, 18 Jun 2018 08:01:38 CDT walmeida at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy Many eyes are watching the likes of Amazon, Apple, Google, Microsoft and other tech stalwarts for some kind of signal about their healthcare intentions. While some moves are already out in the open, such as Apple Health Records and Amazon Web Services expressing interest in longitudinal health records and analytics, the companies also have patents that potentially foretell the future.  As of Jan. 23, Amazon-owned 7,096 U.S. patents, according to the United States Patent and Trademark Office. In addition, Amazon Technologies, Inc., had filed and published 870 patent applications in the U.S. as of Jan. 23, and Amazon.com, Inc., had filed and published 16 patent applications. Amazon has been granted patents for thousands of inventions spanning one-click buying, drones, virtual-reality mirrors and Alexa, the company’s AI–powered voice assistant. Google, for instance, – with 186 patents – focused mostly on investments for DeepMind, its artificial intelligence technology, and also on Verily, its healthcare and disease research entity among its 186 patents, according to the new Kalorama report. Apple filed 54 patents to turn its iPhone into a medical device that can monitor biometric data such as blood pressure and body fat levels and to develop algorithms to predict abnormal heart rates. Microsoft filed 73 patents based on expanding its AI capabilities and developing monitoring devices for chronic diseases. Such innovations have encouraged biopharma, medtech and providers to partner with these tech giants to boost digital healthcare, Kalorama noted.  Although Amazon has not officially announced details, industry rumblings indicate that e-commerce and cloud giant has been working with a secret project team known as 1492 that is exploring platforms for EHR data, health apps and telemedicine. The 1492 team is also reportedly working on extracting data from EMRs to make it more useful to healthcare providers and adding to its existing Amazon products such as Amazon Echo and the Dash Wand to fold into the healthcare setting.  Microsoft, meanwhile, has a number of projects that are impacting – or will impact – the digital health arena including: Microsoft Genomics, Microsoft Azure Security and Compliance Blueprint. The tech giant is also expanding Microsoft's Intelligent Network and plans to create an AI-focused network in cardiology. Twitter: @Bernie_HITN Email the writer: bernie.monegain@himssmedia.com Primary Topic: Electronic Health RecordsAdditional Topics: TechnologyEHRPolicyPolicySpecific Terms: Electronic Health RecordsCustom Tags: Electronic Health RecordsDisable Auto Tagging: Short Headline: Patents hold clues about plans for healthcareNewsletter hed: Patents hold clues about Apple, Amazon, Google and Microsoft plans for healthcareNewsletter teaser: A brief look at what hospitals should know about hundreds of patents tech giants have filed relative to health IT.HOT @HIMSS: Featured Decision Content: 

Many eyes are watching the likes of Amazon, Apple, Google, Microsoft and other tech stalwarts for some kind of signal about their healthcare intentions. While some moves are already out in the open, such as Apple Health Records and Amazon Web Services expressing interest in longitudinal health records and analytics, the companies also have patents that potentially foretell the future. 

As of Jan. 23, Amazon-owned 7,096 U.S. patents, according to the United States Patent and Trademark Office.

In addition, Amazon Technologies, Inc., had filed and published 870 patent applications in the U.S. as of Jan. 23, and Amazon.com, Inc., had filed and published 16 patent applications.

Amazon has been granted patents for thousands of inventions spanning one-click buying, drones, virtual-reality mirrors and Alexa, the company’s AI–powered voice assistant.

Google, for instance, – with 186 patents – focused mostly on investments for DeepMind, its artificial intelligence technology, and also on Verily, its healthcare and disease research entity among its 186 patents, according to the new Kalorama report.

Apple filed 54 patents to turn its iPhone into a medical device that can monitor biometric data such as blood pressure and body fat levels and to develop algorithms to predict abnormal heart rates. Microsoft filed 73 patents based on expanding its AI capabilities and developing monitoring devices for chronic diseases.

Such innovations have encouraged biopharma, medtech and providers to partner with these tech giants to boost digital healthcare, Kalorama noted. 

Although Amazon has not officially announced details, industry rumblings indicate that e-commerce and cloud giant has been working with a secret project team known as 1492 that is exploring platforms for EHR data, health apps and telemedicine. The 1492 team is also reportedly working on extracting data from EMRs to make it more useful to healthcare providers and adding to its existing Amazon products such as Amazon Echo and the Dash Wand to fold into the healthcare setting. 

Microsoft, meanwhile, has a number of projects that are impacting – or will impact – the digital health arena including: Microsoft Genomics, Microsoft Azure Security and Compliance Blueprint. The tech giant is also expanding Microsoft's Intelligent Network and plans to create an AI-focused network in cardiology.

Twitter: @Bernie_HITN
Email the writer: bernie.monegain@himssmedia.com

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Patents hold clues about plans for healthcare
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Patents hold clues about Apple, Amazon, Google and Microsoft plans for healthcare
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A brief look at what hospitals should know about hundreds of patents tech giants have filed relative to health IT.
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Payer Roundup—Centene's acquisition of Fidelis clears major hurdle; D.C. insurers eye 15% ACA premium hikes http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/payer-roundup-centene-s-acquisition-fidelis-clears-major-hurdle-d-c-proposes-double-digit-aca?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/payer-roundup-centene-s-acquisition-fidelis-clears-major-hurdle-d-c-proposes-double-digit-aca?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Sun, 17 Jun 2018 20:01:50 CDT Mike Stankiewicz at FierceHealthcare: Payer Centene's $3.75 billion deal with Fidelis is one step closer to completion following approval by the New York attorney general; ACA insurers in D.C. are eyeing double-digit premiums hikes for 2019; plus more industry news. NIH to end funding for Moderate Alcohol and Cardiovascular Health trial http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-end-funding-moderate-alcohol-cardiovascular-health-trial http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-end-funding-moderate-alcohol-cardiovascular-health-trial Fri, 15 Jun 2018 16:45:00 CDT NIH News Release Trial will end within the next few months following an orderly closeout. ]]> Blues hit the jackpot under Republicans' tax law http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/bluess-rake-billions-from-gop-tax-law?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/bluess-rake-billions-from-gop-tax-law?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 15 Jun 2018 14:13:48 CDT Mike Stankiewicz at FierceHealthcare: Payer Thirteen Blue Cross and Blue Shield health insurers saved billions in taxes last year due to the Republican tax overhaul, but whether that will lead to lower premiums is unclear. New AMA policies takes aim at drug shortages and poor EHR training for medical students http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/new-ama-policies-takes-aim-drug-shortages-and-poor-ehr-training-medical-students http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/new-ama-policies-takes-aim-drug-shortages-and-poor-ehr-training-medical-students Fri, 15 Jun 2018 14:11:15 CDT walmeida at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy The American Medical Association is taking aim at dangerous drug shortages and the need for better EHR education for physicians with two new policies that could change manufacturer infrastructure and medical education. First, a newly adopted policy has declared drug shortages an urgent public health crisis, as many of the drugs currently in dangerously short supply are everyday commodities needed for patient care in all medical settings such as sterile intravenous products containing saline or other fluids.  Shortages of these basic products and their containers significantly ramped up following the devastation wrought by Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico, where most of the bags used in the U.S. are made. The AMA said it would push the Department of Health and Human Services and the Department of Homeland Security to treat drug shortages as a national security initiative resulting in the designation of drug manufacturing sites as”critical infrastructure with vital importance to the nation’s public health. However, that effort must be a shared one with both government and industry. One hurdle the AMA effort faces is manufacturer reluctance to share production locations for drugs and other medical products, despite the fact that any information shared with Health and Human Services and Homeland Security would be protected by law from public disclosure and used only in the context of preparedness planning and response. “To facilitate industry and government collaboration in preparing for disasters and determining contingency plans to mitigate drug shortages, the AMA calls for greater manufacturer transparency regarding production location and problems that may lead to a drug shortage. Given the uncertainty regarding these sites as alternative sources for drugs in short supply, the AMA also calls for more information on the quality of outsourcing compounding facilities,” the organization said in a statement. Second, it’s no secret that electronic health records systems have become an integral part of physician functions in most provider settings, and that under MACRA and value-based reimbursement, they are becoming even more crucial in documenting the quality of care delivered as well as other reportable measures that will influence physician reimbursement. However, the AMA said it is becoming clear that medical students and residents are suffering from a lack of training in medical school and residency programs when it comes to the often-lamented systems. The AMA adopted a new policy at its annual meeting that it hopes will ensure medical students get quality clinical documentation experience using EHRs.  [Also: First IT-savvy med students graduate under pioneering AMA program] “There is a clear need for medical students to have access to - and learn how to properly use -  EHRs well before they enter practice. That’s why, even as we continue to work to improve EHR usability for all physicians and physicians-in-training, we’ve been working over the last five years with medical schools across the country to ensure our future physicians are better equipped to provide care in a practice environment of rapid progress, new technology, and changing expectations both from government and society—directly impacting the way healthcare is delivered nationwide,”  said AMA Board Member and medical student Karthik V. Sarma. According to the AMA’s new policy report, there are concerns about the effects of the EHR on relationships with patients, as students and residents might be more engaged with the chart and computer than with the patient. There is also concern about students and potentially poor role modeling from faculty and care teams on proper use and best practices for EHRs. “The AMA’s new policy encourages medical schools and residency programs to design clinical documentation and EHR training that provides evaluative feedback regarding the value and effectiveness of the training, and that can be evaluated and demonstrated as useful in clinical practice,” the AMA said. The policy also pushes medical schools and residency programs to provide faculty with additional EHR professional development resources to make sure they are setting the appropriate example of EHR use during physician/patient interactions. Twitter: @BethJSanborn Email the writer: beth.sanborn@himssmedia.com Primary Topic: Electronic Health RecordsAdditional Topics: TechnologyEHRPolicyWorkforceLeadershipTechnologyEHRSpecific Terms: Electronic Health RecordsElectronic Health RecordsCustom Tags: Electronic Health RecordsWorkforceElectronic Health RecordsDisable Auto Tagging: Short Headline: AMA’s new policies take aim at drug shortages, poor EHR educationNewsletter hed: New AMA policies takes aim at drug shortages and poor EHR training for medical studentsNewsletter teaser: One new policy deems drug shortages an urgent public health crisis and seeks to have manufacturing sites deemed critical infrastructure.HOT @HIMSS: Featured Decision Content: 

The American Medical Association is taking aim at dangerous drug shortages and the need for better EHR education for physicians with two new policies that could change manufacturer infrastructure and medical education.

First, a newly adopted policy has declared drug shortages an urgent public health crisis, as many of the drugs currently in dangerously short supply are everyday commodities needed for patient care in all medical settings such as sterile intravenous products containing saline or other fluids. 

Shortages of these basic products and their containers significantly ramped up following the devastation wrought by Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico, where most of the bags used in the U.S. are made.

The AMA said it would push the Department of Health and Human Services and the Department of Homeland Security to treat drug shortages as a national security initiative resulting in the designation of drug manufacturing sites as”critical infrastructure with vital importance to the nation’s public health.

However, that effort must be a shared one with both government and industry. One hurdle the AMA effort faces is manufacturer reluctance to share production locations for drugs and other medical products, despite the fact that any information shared with Health and Human Services and Homeland Security would be protected by law from public disclosure and used only in the context of preparedness planning and response.

“To facilitate industry and government collaboration in preparing for disasters and determining contingency plans to mitigate drug shortages, the AMA calls for greater manufacturer transparency regarding production location and problems that may lead to a drug shortage. Given the uncertainty regarding these sites as alternative sources for drugs in short supply, the AMA also calls for more information on the quality of outsourcing compounding facilities,” the organization said in a statement.

Second, it’s no secret that electronic health records systems have become an integral part of physician functions in most provider settings, and that under MACRA and value-based reimbursement, they are becoming even more crucial in documenting the quality of care delivered as well as other reportable measures that will influence physician reimbursement. However, the AMA said it is becoming clear that medical students and residents are suffering from a lack of training in medical school and residency programs when it comes to the often-lamented systems. The AMA adopted a new policy at its annual meeting that it hopes will ensure medical students get quality clinical documentation experience using EHRs. 

[Also: First IT-savvy med students graduate under pioneering AMA program]

“There is a clear need for medical students to have access to - and learn how to properly use -  EHRs well before they enter practice. That’s why, even as we continue to work to improve EHR usability for all physicians and physicians-in-training, we’ve been working over the last five years with medical schools across the country to ensure our future physicians are better equipped to provide care in a practice environment of rapid progress, new technology, and changing expectations both from government and society—directly impacting the way healthcare is delivered nationwide,”  said AMA Board Member and medical student Karthik V. Sarma.

According to the AMA’s new policy report, there are concerns about the effects of the EHR on relationships with patients, as students and residents might be more engaged with the chart and computer than with the patient. There is also concern about students and potentially poor role modeling from faculty and care teams on proper use and best practices for EHRs.

“The AMA’s new policy encourages medical schools and residency programs to design clinical documentation and EHR training that provides evaluative feedback regarding the value and effectiveness of the training, and that can be evaluated and demonstrated as useful in clinical practice,” the AMA said.

The policy also pushes medical schools and residency programs to provide faculty with additional EHR professional development resources to make sure they are setting the appropriate example of EHR use during physician/patient interactions.

Twitter: @BethJSanborn
Email the writer: beth.sanborn@himssmedia.com

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House Committee increases NIH funds, cuts ONC by 29% http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/house-committee-increases-nih-funds-cuts-onc-29 http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/house-committee-increases-nih-funds-cuts-onc-29 Fri, 15 Jun 2018 11:43:30 CDT walmeida at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy The House Appropriations Committee released Thursday its draft funding bill for fiscal year 2019. It includes investments in National Institutes of Health and cuts the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT funding.  Again, this year – for the fourth consecutive year, funds for the NIH got a boost to the tune of $1.25 billion, for a total of $38.3 billion. The committee, meanwhile, reduced funding for the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT by $17.7 million, a 29 percent cut that would put ONC’s annual operating budget at $42.7 million for fiscal year 2019.  NIH funds will go to medical research programs, efforts to stem opioid abuse and support the search for cures for many cancers and diseases, as well as job training and protections against health threats such as pandemics and bio-threats. Specifically, the bill provides increases for several critical research initiatives: $2.25 billion for Alzheimer’s, $528 million for combating antibiotic-resistant bacteria, $437 million for the All of Us research initiative, $400 million, for the Cancer Moonshot research initiative, $366 million for Institutional Development Awards, $130 million to develop a universal influenza vaccine.  Having been approved by the subcommittee, the bill is forwarded to the full committee, usually without further explanation. Twitter: @Bernie_HITN Email the writer: bernie.monegain@himssmedia.com Primary Topic: PolicyAdditional Topics: PolicyPopulation HealthCarePrecision MedicineCarePolicyCustom Tags: Population HealthPrecision MedicineDisable Auto Tagging: Short Headline: House Committee increases NIH funds, cuts ONC by 29%Newsletter hed: House Committee increases NIH funds, cuts ONC by 29%Newsletter teaser: Congress funding for medical research programs to fight the opioid epidemic, and a boost for healthcare IT.HOT @HIMSS: Featured Decision Content: 

The House Appropriations Committee released Thursday its draft funding bill for fiscal year 2019. It includes investments in National Institutes of Health and cuts the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT funding. 

Again, this year – for the fourth consecutive year, funds for the NIH got a boost to the tune of $1.25 billion, for a total of $38.3 billion. The committee, meanwhile, reduced funding for the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT by $17.7 million, a 29 percent cut that would put ONC’s annual operating budget at $42.7 million for fiscal year 2019. 

NIH funds will go to medical research programs, efforts to stem opioid abuse and support the search for cures for many cancers and diseases, as well as job training and protections against health threats such as pandemics and bio-threats.

Specifically, the bill provides increases for several critical research initiatives: $2.25 billion for Alzheimer’s, $528 million for combating antibiotic-resistant bacteria, $437 million for the All of Us research initiative, $400 million, for the Cancer Moonshot research initiative, $366 million for Institutional Development Awards, $130 million to develop a universal influenza vaccine. 

Having been approved by the subcommittee, the bill is forwarded to the full committee, usually without further explanation.

Twitter: @Bernie_HITN
Email the writer: bernie.monegain@himssmedia.com

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Early-stage Respiratory Syncytial Virus vaccine trial begins http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/early-stage-respiratory-syncytial-virus-vaccine-trial-begins http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/early-stage-respiratory-syncytial-virus-vaccine-trial-begins Thu, 14 Jun 2018 19:15:00 CDT NIH News Release Phase 1 study will enroll a small group of healthy adult volunteers. ]]> AI, innovation, value-based care: AHIP18 attendees look to the future http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/ahip18-attendees-look-to-next-big-leap-forward-ai-digital-health-value-based-care?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/ahip18-attendees-look-to-next-big-leap-forward-ai-digital-health-value-based-care?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Thu, 14 Jun 2018 16:37:36 CDT Mike Stankiewicz at FierceHealthcare: Payer Attendees at this year's AHIP conference will have one eye on value and technology, and another looking back on how the industry has changed. Executives from Oscar Health and Aetna said they are particularly focused on innovation and how other companies are leveraging technology. Kaspersky yanks Europol participation after EU calls software 'malicious' http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/kaspersky-yanks-europol-participation-after-eu-calls-software-malicious http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/kaspersky-yanks-europol-participation-after-eu-calls-software-malicious Thu, 14 Jun 2018 11:58:34 CDT walmeida at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy Kaspersky Lab is temporarily suspending its work with Europol and the No More Ransom project following a majority vote from the European Parliament that the Russian-based cybersecurity firm’s software is ‘malicious.’ The motion is an advisory-level document that gives EU nations a general guideline for its cyberdefense plan. Among the clauses, the motion mandates EU states review software and equipment of its IT infrastructure and advises EU states to exclude programs or equipment deemed malicious. The reaction from Kaspersky stems from the clause specifically naming the vendor as an example of a malicious product. Clause 76 states that all products used by EU institutions “exclude potential programs and devices and to ban the ones that have been confirmed as malicious, such as Kaspersky Lab.” Company CEO Eugene Kaspersky took to Twitter to announce his frustration: “European Parliament decision welcomes cybercrime in Europe.” “We have protected the EU for 20 years, working with law enforcement leading to multiple arrests of cybercriminals,” Kaspersky wrote. “The way we conducted public-private partnership[s] is unfortunately ceased until the withdrawal of the European Parliament decision.” Kaspersky worked closely with EU law enforcement on its No More Ransom campaign, which provides ransomware decryptors and assistance. Kaspersky research also helped during the global WannaCry attack of May 2017, providing information on the attack vector and hackers. But the company has been embroiled in controversy with claims that Kaspersky has ties to the Russian government. Its CEO has repeatedly denied those claims. As a result, Kaspersky opened its source code for review, but the U.S. government still officially banned use of its software on federal systems in September 2017. The Netherlands banned Kaspersky software in May. Twitter: @JessieFDavis Email the writer: jessica.davis@himssmedia.com Primary Topic: PolicyAdditional Topics: PolicyTechnologySecurityTechnologySecuritySpecific Terms: Privacy & SecurityPrivacy & SecurityCustom Tags: Privacy & SecurityPrivacy & SecurityDisable Auto Tagging: Short Headline: EU calls Kaspersky software 'malicious'Newsletter hed: Kaspersky yanks Europol participation after EU calls software 'malicious'Newsletter teaser: While fighting conspiracy allegations for more than a year, Kaspersky had continued to work with law enforcement to fight ransomware and other threats, including the global WannaCry attack.HOT @HIMSS: Featured Decision Content: 

Kaspersky Lab is temporarily suspending its work with Europol and the No More Ransom project following a majority vote from the European Parliament that the Russian-based cybersecurity firm’s software is ‘malicious.’

The motion is an advisory-level document that gives EU nations a general guideline for its cyberdefense plan. Among the clauses, the motion mandates EU states review software and equipment of its IT infrastructure and advises EU states to exclude programs or equipment deemed malicious.

The reaction from Kaspersky stems from the clause specifically naming the vendor as an example of a malicious product.

Clause 76 states that all products used by EU institutions “exclude potential programs and devices and to ban the ones that have been confirmed as malicious, such as Kaspersky Lab.”

Company CEO Eugene Kaspersky took to Twitter to announce his frustration: “European Parliament decision welcomes cybercrime in Europe.”

“We have protected the EU for 20 years, working with law enforcement leading to multiple arrests of cybercriminals,” Kaspersky wrote. “The way we conducted public-private partnership[s] is unfortunately ceased until the withdrawal of the European Parliament decision.”

Kaspersky worked closely with EU law enforcement on its No More Ransom campaign, which provides ransomware decryptors and assistance. Kaspersky research also helped during the global WannaCry attack of May 2017, providing information on the attack vector and hackers.

But the company has been embroiled in controversy with claims that Kaspersky has ties to the Russian government. Its CEO has repeatedly denied those claims.

As a result, Kaspersky opened its source code for review, but the U.S. government still officially banned use of its software on federal systems in September 2017. The Netherlands banned Kaspersky software in May.

Twitter: @JessieFDavis
Email the writer: jessica.davis@himssmedia.com

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The Dutch Ministry of Health is taking a hard stance on interoperability http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/video/dutch-ministry-health-taking-hard-stance-interoperability http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/video/dutch-ministry-health-taking-hard-stance-interoperability Thu, 14 Jun 2018 11:39:48 CDT walmeida at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy Primary topic: InteroperabilityPrimary Topic: PolicyAdditional Topics: PolicyInteroperabilityTechnologyInteroperabilityTechnologyCustom Tags: InteroperabilityInteroperabilityDisable Auto Tagging: Short Headline: The Dutch Ministry of Health is taking a hard stance on interoperabilityNewsletter hed: The Dutch Ministry of Health is taking a hard stance on interoperabilityNewsletter teaser: Erik Gerritsen, secretary at the Dutch Ministry of Health talks about new plans to ensure healthcare providers are sharing their data.Featured Decision Content: 
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It's not about technology, it's about culture http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/video/its-not-about-technology-its-about-culture http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/video/its-not-about-technology-its-about-culture Thu, 14 Jun 2018 11:30:35 CDT walmeida at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy Primary topic: Government & PolicyPrimary Topic: PolicyAdditional Topics: PolicyPolicyDisable Auto Tagging: Short Headline: It's not about technology, it's about cultureNewsletter hed: It's not about technology, it's about cultureNewsletter teaser: Lucien Engelen, director of the Radboud Innovation Center in the Netherlands, says effective adoption of new technology in healthcare often depends on understanding that it is only part of what drives better patient care.Featured Decision Content: 
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Lucien Engelen, director of the Radboud Innovation Center in the Netherlands, says effective adoption of new technology in healthcare often depends on understanding that it is only part of what drives better patient care.
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Transforming Turkey: How a race for high standards helped a country unify around digital healthcare http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/video/transforming-turkey-how-race-high-standards-helped-country-unify-around-digital-healthcare http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/video/transforming-turkey-how-race-high-standards-helped-country-unify-around-digital-healthcare Thu, 14 Jun 2018 11:12:47 CDT walmeida at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy Primary topic: Government & PolicyPrimary Topic: Electronic Health RecordsAdditional Topics: TechnologyEHRPolicyPolicySpecific Terms: Electronic Health RecordsCustom Tags: Electronic Health RecordsDisable Auto Tagging: Short Headline: Transforming Turkey: How a race for high standards helped a country unify around digital healthcareNewsletter hed: Transforming Turkey: How a race for high standards helped a country unify around digital healthcareNewsletter teaser: Ilker Köse, technology transfer office director at Istanbul Medipol University, says the motivation to adopt EMRAM standards created the momentum needed to transform hospital systems.Featured Decision Content: 
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Insurer and provider groups wade into latest ACA legal battle http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/physician-groups-wade-into-latest-aca-lawsuit?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/physician-groups-wade-into-latest-aca-lawsuit?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Thu, 14 Jun 2018 10:39:07 CDT Mike Stankiewicz at FierceHealthcare: Payer Several insurer and hospital groups, including the American Medical Association and American Hospital Association, are coming to the defense of the Affordable Care Act in its latest legal battle. The groups said GOP attorneys general lack legal standing and argued invalidating the ACA would have "a devastating impact." Understanding Sweden's eHealth 2025 strategy http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/video/understanding-swedens-ehealth-2025-strategy http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/video/understanding-swedens-ehealth-2025-strategy Thu, 14 Jun 2018 10:01:05 CDT walmeida at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy Primary topic: Government & PolicyPrimary Topic: Electronic Health RecordsAdditional Topics: TechnologyEHRPolicyPolicySpecific Terms: Electronic Health RecordsCustom Tags: Electronic Health RecordsDisable Auto Tagging: Short Headline: Understanding Sweden's eHealth 2025 strategyNewsletter hed: Understanding Sweden's eHealth 2025 strategyNewsletter teaser: Karina Tellinger McNeil, strategist for the Swedish Association of Local Authorities and Regions, breaks down her country's ambitious plan to lead the world in the digitization of healthcare.Featured Decision Content: 
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NIH-supported researchers find link between allergen in red meat and heart disease http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-supported-researchers-find-link-between-allergen-red-meat-heart-disease http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-supported-researchers-find-link-between-allergen-red-meat-heart-disease Thu, 14 Jun 2018 09:00:00 CDT NIH News Release A subgroup of the population may be at heightened risk for this food allergen. ]]> NIH study finds no significant link between brain injury and IV fluid treatment of pediatric diabetic ketoacidosis http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-study-finds-no-significant-link-between-brain-injury-iv-fluid-treatment-pediatric-diabetic-ketoacidosis http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-study-finds-no-significant-link-between-brain-injury-iv-fluid-treatment-pediatric-diabetic-ketoacidosis Wed, 13 Jun 2018 21:00:00 CDT NIH News Release Diabetic ketoacidosis is often the first sign of type 1 diabetes in children who have not yet been diagnosed. ]]> New trans-NIH consortium aims to advance pediatric research on a global level http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/new-trans-nih-consortium-aims-advance-pediatric-research-global-level http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/new-trans-nih-consortium-aims-advance-pediatric-research-global-level Wed, 13 Jun 2018 13:15:00 CDT NIH News Release Nearly all of the 27 NIH institutes and centers fund some aspects of child health research. ]]> CVS-Aetna prospects increase after AT&T-Time Warner approval, but challenges remain http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/cvs-aetna-prospects-increase-after-at-t-time-warner-approval?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/cvs-aetna-prospects-increase-after-at-t-time-warner-approval?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Wed, 13 Jun 2018 12:10:22 CDT Mike Stankiewicz at FierceHealthcare: Payer If stock prices are anything to consider, federal approval of a merger between AT&T and Time Warner certainly doesn't hurt CVS and Aetna's chances, industry experts tell FierceHealthcare. Consumers skeptical of Berkshire-Amazon-JPMorgan, single-payer http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/consumers-very-skeptical-berkshire-amazon-jp-morgan-single-payer-survey?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/consumers-very-skeptical-berkshire-amazon-jp-morgan-single-payer-survey?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Wed, 13 Jun 2018 11:05:41 CDT Mike Stankiewicz at FierceHealthcare: Payer While everyone from Congress to Amazon is trying to overhaul the health insurance industry, most consumers are happy with the status quo, according to a newly released survey. We got our hands on the results, some of which were a bit surprising. How CVS Health boosted specialty medication adherence with secure messaging, digital engagement http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/tech/cvs-health-specialty-medications-secure-messaging-digital-engagement?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/tech/cvs-health-specialty-medications-secure-messaging-digital-engagement?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Wed, 13 Jun 2018 09:46:26 CDT Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: Payer After an initial pilot showed a 30% jump in optimal medication adherence for cancer patients, CVS Health rolled out a secure messaging platform across its specialty division, with customized alerts on side effects and lab draws. “The current digital interaction wasn’t enough,” Surya Singh, CMO of Specialty for CVS Health, told FierceHealthcare. Senate Finance Committee advances massive opioid package targeting Medicare, Medicaid http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/senate-finance-advances-massive-opioid-package-targeted-at-medicare-medicaid?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/senate-finance-advances-massive-opioid-package-targeted-at-medicare-medicaid?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Tue, 12 Jun 2018 20:47:09 CDT Mike Stankiewicz at FierceHealthcare: Payer Legislation aimed at combating the opioid crisis is slowly but surely making its way through the Senate with a major focus on Medicare and Medicaid. Despite widespread agreement on the bills, the hearing still featured a few political jabs. NIH leadership outlines interdisciplinary FY2018 research plan for HEAL Initiative http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-leadership-outlines-interdisciplinary-fy2018-research-plan-heal-initiative http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-leadership-outlines-interdisciplinary-fy2018-research-plan-heal-initiative Tue, 12 Jun 2018 14:00:00 CDT NIH News Release The plan focuses on improving treatments for opioid misuse and addiction, and enhancing strategies for pain management. ]]> Payer Roundup—Nursing homes sue to stop state Medicaid cuts; LePage appeals expansion ruling http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/payer-roundup-lepage-keeps-fighting-medicaid-expansion?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/payer-roundup-lepage-keeps-fighting-medicaid-expansion?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Tue, 12 Jun 2018 13:37:40 CDT Mike Stankiewicz at FierceHealthcare: Payer Montana nursing homes are trying to stop a looming Medicaid payment cut, while Ohio has canceled its own planned cuts to hospitals. Meanwhile, Maine's governor is still resisting Medicaid expansion. NIH launches HerbList, a mobile app on herbal products http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-launches-herblist-mobile-app-herbal-products http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-launches-herblist-mobile-app-herbal-products Tue, 12 Jun 2018 12:30:00 CDT NIH News Release App offers easy access to scientifically backed information on herbs and herbal products. ]]> Murphy, Herring say voters will remember GOP's 'reckless' ACA lawsuit http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/murphy-herring-voters-will-remember-doj-s-assault-pre-existing-condition-protections?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/murphy-herring-voters-will-remember-doj-s-assault-pre-existing-condition-protections?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Tue, 12 Jun 2018 12:21:06 CDT Mike Stankiewicz at FierceHealthcare: Payer One by one, Democrats are calling out the Trump administration's decision not to defend the Affordable Care Act in a federal lawsuit, and warn that voters will remember that decision come November. Azar defends PBMs in Trump administration's plan to bring down drug costs http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/hospitals-health-systems/azar-defends-trump-administration-s-outlook-negotiating-or-not-drug-prices?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/hospitals-health-systems/azar-defends-trump-administration-s-outlook-negotiating-or-not-drug-prices?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Tue, 12 Jun 2018 10:31:04 CDT Tina Reed at FierceHealthcare: Payer Democrats, in particular, questioned HHS Secretary Alex Azar on why Trump backed away from a campaign promise to allow Medicare to directly negotiate prices with drug companies. Here's why Azar said they've got it wrong. NIH announces 2018-2019 Medical Research Scholars Program class http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-announces-2018-2019-medical-research-scholars-program-class http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-announces-2018-2019-medical-research-scholars-program-class Mon, 11 Jun 2018 16:30:00 CDT NIH News Release Accepted scholars begin their fellowship in July/August 2018. ]]> Payer Roundup—UnitedHealth buys 63K-member Medicare Advantage plan provider http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/payer-roundup-unitedhealth-buys-63k-member-medicare-advantage-plan-provider?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/payer-roundup-unitedhealth-buys-63k-member-medicare-advantage-plan-provider?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Mon, 11 Jun 2018 16:08:07 CDT Mike Stankiewicz at FierceHealthcare: Payer UnitedHealthcare is planning a big move in the Medicare Advantage space; backlash from Democrats over the DOJ's refusal to defend the ACA continues; plus more news across the payer industry. Analysis: Mandatory bundled payments have few advantages over voluntary bundles http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/analysis-mandatory-bundles-have-few-advantages-over-voluntary-bundles?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/analysis-mandatory-bundles-have-few-advantages-over-voluntary-bundles?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Mon, 11 Jun 2018 15:26:35 CDT Mike Stankiewicz at FierceHealthcare: Payer A yearslong debate has raged over whether mandatory bundled payment programs are better at curbing spending and improving quality than voluntary programs. A new study has the answer.