MedClimate Health News Daily http://medclimate.com/feed en-us Copyright MedClimate, Inc2020 Benefits of fetal surgery to repair spina bifida persist through school age http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/benefits-fetal-surgery-repair-spina-bifida-persist-through-school-age http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/benefits-fetal-surgery-repair-spina-bifida-persist-through-school-age Fri, 24 Jan 2020 13:45:00 CST NIH News Release The procedure corrects myelomeningocele, the most serious form of spina bifida. ]]> FDA issues cybersecurity alert on GE Healthcare medical devices http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/fda-issues-cybersecurity-alert-ge-healthcare-medical-devices http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/fda-issues-cybersecurity-alert-ge-healthcare-medical-devices Fri, 24 Jan 2020 13:31:06 CST at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com The communication says vulnerabilities in Clinical Information Central Stations and Telemetry Servers "might allow an attack to happen undetected and without user interaction." FDA issues cybersecurity alert on GE Healthcare medical devices http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/fda-issues-cybersecurity-alert-ge-healthcare-medical-devices http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/fda-issues-cybersecurity-alert-ge-healthcare-medical-devices Fri, 24 Jan 2020 13:31:06 CST mmiliard at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has put out a safety alert concerning GE Healthcare Clinical Information Central Stations and Telemetry Servers, which it says could pose risks to the patients they're monitoring. FDA issued the safety communication, which concerns cybersecurity vulnerabilities in the devices, following GE Healthcare's own issuance in November 2019 of a letter informing consumers of the security vulnerabilities in the listed devices, as well as directions to software updates and patches. The specific security risk concerns a vulnerability within the Clinical Information Central Stations and Telemetry Servers that could allow a hacker to change settings and configurations inside the device, including the ability to silence alarms or otherwise interfere with the patient monitoring capabilities. "These vulnerabilities might allow an attack to happen undetected and without user interaction," FDA noted in its communication. "Because an attack may be interpreted by the affected device as normal network communications, it may remain invisible to existing security measures." Telemetry servers and clinical information central stations are used mostly in health care facilities for displaying temperature, heartbeat, blood pressure, and other physiologic parameters of a patient. The listed devices include the ApexPro Telemetry Server and CARESCAPE Telemetry Server running software version 4.2 or earlier, CARESCAPE Central Station (CSCS) version 1 running software 1.x, and CIC Pro Clinical Information Center Central Station version 1, running software versions 4.x and 5.x. FDA recommends providers work with staff to determine which devices and patients may be affected and take appropriate steps to reduce risk, the agency said, noting that it was thus far unaware of any "adverse events" related to the software vulnerabilities. GE Healthcare will be issuing a software patch to address the vulnerabilities and will notify affected customers to deploy them when the patches are ready. In the meantime, the risk posed by the vulnerabilities can be reduced by segregating the network connecting the patient monitors with the GE Healthcare Clinical Information Central Stations and Telemetry Servers from the rest of the hospital network, as described in the GE Healthcare documentation for these devices. FDA said to use firewalls, segregated networks, virtual private networks, network monitors, or other technologies that minimize the risk of remote or local network attacks. The safety communication also noted the security risk could be reduced by segregating the devices in question from the rest of the hospital network, as well as through the use of firewalls, virtual private networks and network monitors. According to research CyberMDX, the common element across these vulnerabilities--beyond the devices they affect and their shared point of discovery--is that they all present a direct path to the device's compromise, whether by way of illicit control, read, write, or upload capabilities. Meanwhile, the CEO of third-party risk management specialist Censine, Ed Gaudet, released a statement calling for a fundamental rethink in the way health providers approach risk assessment and third-party medical devices. "Malicious actors have gotten very good at identifying and exposing weak links in healthcare security," Gaudet,'s statement noted. "Unfortunately, it's becoming increasingly common that the weakest link is a third-party medical device." Nathan Eddy is a healthcare and technology freelancer based in Berlin. Email the writer: nathaneddy@gmail.com Twitter: @dropdeaded209

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has put out a safety alert concerning GE Healthcare Clinical Information Central Stations and Telemetry Servers, which it says could pose risks to the patients they're monitoring.

FDA issued the safety communication, which concerns cybersecurity vulnerabilities in the devices, following GE Healthcare's own issuance in November 2019 of a letter informing consumers of the security vulnerabilities in the listed devices, as well as directions to software updates and patches.

The specific security risk concerns a vulnerability within the Clinical Information Central Stations and Telemetry Servers that could allow a hacker to change settings and configurations inside the device, including the ability to silence alarms or otherwise interfere with the patient monitoring capabilities.

"These vulnerabilities might allow an attack to happen undetected and without user interaction," FDA noted in its communication. "Because an attack may be interpreted by the affected device as normal network communications, it may remain invisible to existing security measures."

Telemetry servers and clinical information central stations are used mostly in health care facilities for displaying temperature, heartbeat, blood pressure, and other physiologic parameters of a patient.

The listed devices include the ApexPro Telemetry Server and CARESCAPE Telemetry Server running software version 4.2 or earlier, CARESCAPE Central Station (CSCS) version 1 running software 1.x, and CIC Pro Clinical Information Center Central Station version 1, running software versions 4.x and 5.x.

FDA recommends providers work with staff to determine which devices and patients may be affected and take appropriate steps to reduce risk, the agency said, noting that it was thus far unaware of any "adverse events" related to the software vulnerabilities.

GE Healthcare will be issuing a software patch to address the vulnerabilities and will notify affected customers to deploy them when the patches are ready.

In the meantime, the risk posed by the vulnerabilities can be reduced by segregating the network connecting the patient monitors with the GE Healthcare Clinical Information Central Stations and Telemetry Servers from the rest of the hospital network, as described in the GE Healthcare documentation for these devices.

FDA said to use firewalls, segregated networks, virtual private networks, network monitors, or other technologies that minimize the risk of remote or local network attacks.

The safety communication also noted the security risk could be reduced by segregating the devices in question from the rest of the hospital network, as well as through the use of firewalls, virtual private networks and network monitors.

According to research CyberMDX, the common element across these vulnerabilities--beyond the devices they affect and their shared point of discovery--is that they all present a direct path to the device's compromise, whether by way of illicit control, read, write, or upload capabilities.

Meanwhile, the CEO of third-party risk management specialist Censine, Ed Gaudet, released a statement calling for a fundamental rethink in the way health providers approach risk assessment and third-party medical devices.

"Malicious actors have gotten very good at identifying and exposing weak links in healthcare security," Gaudet,'s statement noted. "Unfortunately, it's becoming increasingly common that the weakest link is a third-party medical device."

Nathan Eddy is a healthcare and technology freelancer based in Berlin.
Email the writer: nathaneddy@gmail.com
Twitter: @dropdeaded209

]]>
Low-dose aspirin may reduce preterm birth risk among first-time mothers http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/low-dose-aspirin-may-reduce-preterm-birth-risk-among-first-time-mothers http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/low-dose-aspirin-may-reduce-preterm-birth-risk-among-first-time-mothers Fri, 24 Jan 2020 13:30:00 CST NIH News Release The clinical trial involved more than 11,000 women in several low- and middle-income countries. ]]> Epic pushes out software update to help spot coronavirus http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/epic-pushes-out-software-update-help-spot-coronavirus http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/epic-pushes-out-software-update-help-spot-coronavirus Fri, 24 Jan 2020 11:12:39 CST at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com Epic this week sent out an update to its healthcare customers, meant to help providers nationwide detect potential cases of the Wuhan novel coronavirus, or 2019-nCoV. WHY IT MATTERS Epic has standardized the new travel screening questionnaire in an effort to ensure clinicians and other front-line medical staff ask patients about recent international travel. Athenahealth’s take on HIMSS20 trends: primary care disruption, AI and competitive data access http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/athenahealth-s-take-himss20-trends-primary-care-disruption-ai-and-competitive-data-access http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/athenahealth-s-take-himss20-trends-primary-care-disruption-ai-and-competitive-data-access Fri, 24 Jan 2020 10:48:13 CST at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com The executive director of research at the cloud IT giant describes what CIOs and other healthcare leaders should be looking for at the global conference in March. NIH officials discuss novel coronavirus that recently emerged in China http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-officials-discuss-novel-coronavirus-recently-emerged-china http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-officials-discuss-novel-coronavirus-recently-emerged-china Thu, 23 Jan 2020 20:30:00 CST NIH News Release Research underway to address latest viral threat. ]]> Yale experts offer strategies for successful clinical AI rollouts http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/yale-experts-offer-strategies-successful-clinical-ai-rollouts http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/yale-experts-offer-strategies-successful-clinical-ai-rollouts Thu, 23 Jan 2020 13:07:24 CST at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com As regulatory oversight for predictive decision support evolves, certain best practices can help health systems get the most from machine learning-powered CDS models. Health IT 2020: Patient engagement, human-centered tech, interoperability http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/health-it-2020-patient-engagement-human-centered-tech-interoperability http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/health-it-2020-patient-engagement-human-centered-tech-interoperability Thu, 23 Jan 2020 10:47:26 CST at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com The chief medical officer and co-founder at patient engagement tech vendor Luma Health provides a view of what provider organizations can expect in the year ahead. Healthcare venture investment in 2020: Quantum computing gets a closer look http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/healthcare-venture-investment-2020-quantum-computing-gets-closer-look http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/healthcare-venture-investment-2020-quantum-computing-gets-closer-look Thu, 23 Jan 2020 09:57:35 CST at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com Artificial intelligence will also continue to be a big focus, as it becomes more clear which startups are succeeding in their initial target sectors. VCs are also eyeing genomics analytics tools, as well as other more practical technologies. NHS trust predicts £2.5m savings from investment in IT solution http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/europe/nhs-trust-predicts-25m-savings-investment-it-solution http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/europe/nhs-trust-predicts-25m-savings-investment-it-solution Thu, 23 Jan 2020 09:37:43 CST at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com Norfolk and Norwich University Hospitals Foundation Trust has contracted IMMJ Systems and SPS to digitise patient healthcare records. NIH-supported scientists reverse HIV and SIV latency in two animal models http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-supported-scientists-reverse-hiv-siv-latency-two-animal-models http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-supported-scientists-reverse-hiv-siv-latency-two-animal-models Wed, 22 Jan 2020 18:00:00 CST NIH News Release Findings represent progress toward an HIV cure. ]]> Pregnancy, breastfeeding may lower risk of early menopause, NIH-funded study suggests http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/pregnancy-breastfeeding-may-lower-risk-early-menopause-nih-study-suggests http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/pregnancy-breastfeeding-may-lower-risk-early-menopause-nih-study-suggests Wed, 22 Jan 2020 17:45:00 CST NIH News Release Menopause before age 45 increases the risk of early death, cognitive decline, osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease. ]]> VA seeing substantial growth in telehealth, key patient engagement tools http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/va-seeing-substantial-growth-telehealth-key-patient-engagement-tools http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/va-seeing-substantial-growth-telehealth-key-patient-engagement-tools Wed, 22 Jan 2020 12:45:23 CST mmiliard at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy The U.S. Department of veterans affairs has been making major investments in innovating its technology and infrastructure in recent years. There's the massive electronic health record modernization, of course, but also everything from a new National Artificial Intelligence Institute to an Apple Health Records rollout to a project focused on tablet-based telehealth. Indeed, telehealth continues to be a major priority for the VA. It's already responsible for the biggest telemedicine infrastructure in the nation, and use of its telehealth services is surging. The sprawling provider network continues to seek new ways to deliver better care to its members where they live, in their communities and their homes. At HIMSS20, Dr. Neil C. Evans, chief officer in the VA's Office Of Connected Care, will speak about some lessons learned as the department, a longtime health IT leader, works to make more progress with its connected care initiatives. With more than 325,000 employees at 150 VA Medical Centers and 1,400 community-based clinical settings, and caring more than 9 million veterans each year, the challenges and opportunities for technology-enabled care delivery at VA are clear. In Orlando on March 10, Evans will describe how the agency is embracing its mandate to broaden access to telehealth and make community care available to more veterans. He'll show how VA is reconfiguring its systems to increase patient engagement across its network, and will offer some perspective on what's worked – and what hasn't – in its care innovations. Evans recently answered some questions from Healthcare IT News about how technology is helping VA make big improvements in patient access, engagement and experience. Q. What has VA’s recent prioritization of telehealth enabled for the care veterans can receive? A. Telehealth allows VA to bring health care to veterans where they live when that’s their desire, making care more accessible and more convenient. In addition, telehealth allows the VA to more efficiently provide clinical expertise across the entire health care system. Finally, a veteran’s geographic location should not limit their access to quality care. VA is committed to increasing access to care for all enrolled veterans and has placed special emphasis on those in rural and remote locations. Q. Similarly, how has technology-enabled patient engagement improved across the VA in recent years? A. VA was an early adopter of digital health tools and remains a leader within US health care in leveraging technology to enhance patient engagement. My HealtheVet, VA’s online patient portal now has more than 5 million registered users and typically sees 1.1 million veterans interacting with the site, including their personal health data, every month. VA helped launch the Blue Button initiative and we’ve now seen 38 million Blue Button downloads by veterans since August 2010. The most recent feature launched on VA’s portal allows veterans to download their full imaging files, including the opportunity to burn a disc with their DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine) files and a DICOM viewer. "These digital tools are allowing veterans to more actively understand their health data, to better communicate with VA clinical teams and to engage more productively as they navigate their individual health journeys." Neil C. Evans, VA Office Of Connected Care Beyond the portal, over the last several years, VA has dramatically expanded the digital tools it offers veterans. For example, the Annie App – an automated protocol-based two-way text messaging system allows for personalized texts that help veterans with self-care. VA is piloting a health chat feature as well. And VA’s mobile app store now has 45 apps available to help veterans monitor and manage numerous health issues, to include smoking cessation, patient management, mental health care, and more. These digital tools are allowing veterans to more actively understand their health data, to better communicate with VA clinical teams and to engage more productively as they navigate their individual health journeys. Q. Do you have any numbers indicating how many more veterans are using tech to connect with their providers? A. In FY19, VA provided more than 2.6 million telehealth episodes of care, such as a video appointment or a store and forward telehealth exchange, to more than 900,000 veterans. For example, more than 490,000 veterans utilized VA’s video telehealth capabilities last year, and 50 percent of those veterans lived in rural communities. Our patient portal, My HealtheVet, continues to grow, now with more than 5 million registered users. In FY19, there were more than 20.6 million Rx refill requests. Since its inception in June of 2008, more than 86 million VA Secure Messages have been initiated by VA patients or their care teams. Q. How does the VA’s ongoing electronic health record modernization play into these new advancements? A. Connected care technologies enhance the ability for veterans to connect with their health care providers, synchronously or asynchronously. The most effective interventions enhance or extend a traditional health care relationship. For health care providers, the electronic health record is their go-to application for getting work done. It’s where the data is and where most workflows and health care transactions play out. Accordingly, provider adoption of telehealth and connected care is enhanced when better integrated with the electronic health record. As part of VA’s EHR modernization efforts, efforts are underway to deeply integrate and build VA’s connected care technologies directly into the new record, in support of a better veteran and provider experience and further expansion of virtual care delivery. Q. Your presentation description mentions strategies that “worked and didn’t work” along the way. What have been some lessons learned? A. Without giving too much of my presentation away, I’ll say that there are a few key takeaways. First, for health systems to be successful, Connected Care / Telehealth needs to be someone’s job. To make the technology successful, VA has focused on ensuring that implementation experts and technology managers are available to train providers and patients alike and to help integrate these technologies as a natural part of a provider’s and patient’s workflow. Second, the digital divide is a real concern and must be addressed. Equitable access to virtual care services is critical. And third, well … come to my HIMSS20 presentation and let’s discuss! Q. VA seems to be pioneering a model of care that many say will soon become much more common across the US: where hospitals are only for the most acute cases, and the majority of care is delivered remotely in the home. Do you agree? A. Regardless of technology, healthcare will always be about the relationship between patients and their care teams. Where and how these relationships, focused on helping patients improve their health, develop and play out is in flux. More and more is happening virtually (secure messaging, telephone, chat, video, mHealth apps, and more) and I think this trend will only continue. But not to the exclusion of in-person care, which will always be necessary. Q. Any closing thoughts or hoped-for takeaways for those who attend this session? A. Connected Care is part of VA’s DNA, a mission-critical capability of the overall health care system; it’s increasing the accessibility of care, the efficiency of care delivery in our national health care system, the quality of care, and the veteran experience of care. I certainly hope that some of what VA has learned will prove helpful for other health care systems who are also advancing these capabilities Dr. Neil C. Evans will describe VA's telehealth and patient engagement initiatives in his HIMSS20 session, "Connected Care As an Access and Patient Engagement Strategy." It's scheduled for Tuesday, March 10, from 1:30-2:30 p.m. in room W311E. Twitter: @MikeMiliardHITN Email the writer: mike.miliard@himssmedia.com Healthcare IT News is a publication of HIMSS Media.

The U.S. Department of veterans affairs has been making major investments in innovating its technology and infrastructure in recent years.

There's the massive electronic health record modernization, of course, but also everything from a new National Artificial Intelligence Institute to an Apple Health Records rollout to a project focused on tablet-based telehealth.

Indeed, telehealth continues to be a major priority for the VA. It's already responsible for the biggest telemedicine infrastructure in the nation, and use of its telehealth services is surging. The sprawling provider network continues to seek new ways to deliver better care to its members where they live, in their communities and their homes.

At HIMSS20, Dr. Neil C. Evans, chief officer in the VA's Office Of Connected Care, will speak about some lessons learned as the department, a longtime health IT leader, works to make more progress with its connected care initiatives.

With more than 325,000 employees at 150 VA Medical Centers and 1,400 community-based clinical settings, and caring more than 9 million veterans each year, the challenges and opportunities for technology-enabled care delivery at VA are clear.

In Orlando on March 10, Evans will describe how the agency is embracing its mandate to broaden access to telehealth and make community care available to more veterans. He'll show how VA is reconfiguring its systems to increase patient engagement across its network, and will offer some perspective on what's worked – and what hasn't – in its care innovations.

Evans recently answered some questions from Healthcare IT News about how technology is helping VA make big improvements in patient access, engagement and experience.

Q. What has VA’s recent prioritization of telehealth enabled for the care veterans can receive?

A. Telehealth allows VA to bring health care to veterans where they live when that’s their desire, making care more accessible and more convenient. In addition, telehealth allows the VA to more efficiently provide clinical expertise across the entire health care system. Finally, a veteran’s geographic location should not limit their access to quality care. VA is committed to increasing access to care for all enrolled veterans and has placed special emphasis on those in rural and remote locations.

Q. Similarly, how has technology-enabled patient engagement improved across the VA in recent years?

A. VA was an early adopter of digital health tools and remains a leader within US health care in leveraging technology to enhance patient engagement. My HealtheVet, VA’s online patient portal now has more than 5 million registered users and typically sees 1.1 million veterans interacting with the site, including their personal health data, every month.

VA helped launch the Blue Button initiative and we’ve now seen 38 million Blue Button downloads by veterans since August 2010. The most recent feature launched on VA’s portal allows veterans to download their full imaging files, including the opportunity to burn a disc with their DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine) files and a DICOM viewer.

"These digital tools are allowing veterans to more actively understand their health data, to better communicate with VA clinical teams and to engage more productively as they navigate their individual health journeys."

Neil C. Evans, VA Office Of Connected Care

Beyond the portal, over the last several years, VA has dramatically expanded the digital tools it offers veterans. For example, the Annie App – an automated protocol-based two-way text messaging system allows for personalized texts that help veterans with self-care. VA is piloting a health chat feature as well. And VA’s mobile app store now has 45 apps available to help veterans monitor and manage numerous health issues, to include smoking cessation, patient management, mental health care, and more.

These digital tools are allowing veterans to more actively understand their health data, to better communicate with VA clinical teams and to engage more productively as they navigate their individual health journeys.

Q. Do you have any numbers indicating how many more veterans are using tech to connect with their providers?

A. In FY19, VA provided more than 2.6 million telehealth episodes of care, such as a video appointment or a store and forward telehealth exchange, to more than 900,000 veterans. For example, more than 490,000 veterans utilized VA’s video telehealth capabilities last year, and 50 percent of those veterans lived in rural communities.

Our patient portal, My HealtheVet, continues to grow, now with more than 5 million registered users. In FY19, there were more than 20.6 million Rx refill requests. Since its inception in June of 2008, more than 86 million VA Secure Messages have been initiated by VA patients or their care teams.

Q. How does the VA’s ongoing electronic health record modernization play into these new advancements?

A. Connected care technologies enhance the ability for veterans to connect with their health care providers, synchronously or asynchronously. The most effective interventions enhance or extend a traditional health care relationship. For health care providers, the electronic health record is their go-to application for getting work done. It’s where the data is and where most workflows and health care transactions play out.

Accordingly, provider adoption of telehealth and connected care is enhanced when better integrated with the electronic health record. As part of VA’s EHR modernization efforts, efforts are underway to deeply integrate and build VA’s connected care technologies directly into the new record, in support of a better veteran and provider experience and further expansion of virtual care delivery.

Q. Your presentation description mentions strategies that “worked and didn’t work” along the way. What have been some lessons learned?

A. Without giving too much of my presentation away, I’ll say that there are a few key takeaways.

First, for health systems to be successful, Connected Care / Telehealth needs to be someone’s job. To make the technology successful, VA has focused on ensuring that implementation experts and technology managers are available to train providers and patients alike and to help integrate these technologies as a natural part of a provider’s and patient’s workflow.

Second, the digital divide is a real concern and must be addressed. Equitable access to virtual care services is critical.

And third, well … come to my HIMSS20 presentation and let’s discuss!

Q. VA seems to be pioneering a model of care that many say will soon become much more common across the US: where hospitals are only for the most acute cases, and the majority of care is delivered remotely in the home. Do you agree?

A. Regardless of technology, healthcare will always be about the relationship between patients and their care teams. Where and how these relationships, focused on helping patients improve their health, develop and play out is in flux. More and more is happening virtually (secure messaging, telephone, chat, video, mHealth apps, and more) and I think this trend will only continue. But not to the exclusion of in-person care, which will always be necessary.

Q. Any closing thoughts or hoped-for takeaways for those who attend this session?

A. Connected Care is part of VA’s DNA, a mission-critical capability of the overall health care system; it’s increasing the accessibility of care, the efficiency of care delivery in our national health care system, the quality of care, and the veteran experience of care. I certainly hope that some of what VA has learned will prove helpful for other health care systems who are also advancing these capabilities

Dr. Neil C. Evans will describe VA's telehealth and patient engagement initiatives in his HIMSS20 session, "Connected Care As an Access and Patient Engagement Strategy." It's scheduled for Tuesday, March 10, from 1:30-2:30 p.m. in room W311E.

Twitter: @MikeMiliardHITN
Email the writer: mike.miliard@himssmedia.com

Healthcare IT News is a publication of HIMSS Media.

]]>
VA seeing substantial growth in telehealth, key patient engagement tools http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/va-seeing-substantial-growth-telehealth-key-patient-engagement-tools http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/va-seeing-substantial-growth-telehealth-key-patient-engagement-tools Wed, 22 Jan 2020 12:45:23 CST at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com In 2019, it offered more than 2.6 million telehealth episodes of care to more than 900,000 veterans. At HIMSS20, a VA leader will show how this, plus innovations such as My HealtheVet and Blue Button, is boosting veterans' patient experience. Epic to debut ambient voice technology assistant at HIMSS20 http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/epic-debut-ambient-voice-technology-assistant-himss20 http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/epic-debut-ambient-voice-technology-assistant-himss20 Wed, 22 Jan 2020 11:02:09 CST at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com “Just like you use your smart speaker at home, clinicians soon will be able to say ‘Hey Epic’ to quickly get the information they need and take action,” an Epic exec reveals. Philips CTO outlines ethical guidelines for AI in healthcare http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/philips-cto-outlines-ethical-guidelines-ai-healthcare http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/philips-cto-outlines-ethical-guidelines-ai-healthcare Wed, 22 Jan 2020 10:15:07 CST at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com The five principles all stem from the basic viewpoint that AI-enabled solutions should complement and benefit customers, patients, and society as a whole. Drug increases brown fat activity in healthy women http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/drug-increases-brown-fat-activity-healthy-women http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/drug-increases-brown-fat-activity-healthy-women Tue, 21 Jan 2020 19:30:00 CST NIH News Release Brown fat, or brown adipose tissue, is a form of fat that burns calories to generate heat. ]]> Combined prenatal smoking and drinking greatly increases SIDS risk http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/combined-prenatal-smoking-drinking-greatly-increases-sids-risk http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/combined-prenatal-smoking-drinking-greatly-increases-sids-risk Tue, 21 Jan 2020 14:30:00 CST NIH News Release SIDS is the sudden, unexplained, death of an infant under 1 year of age. ]]> Researchers discover unmet needs in Thai diabetes care http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/asia-pacific/researchers-discover-unmet-needs-thai-diabetes-care http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/asia-pacific/researchers-discover-unmet-needs-thai-diabetes-care Sun, 19 Jan 2020 20:48:14 CST deankoh at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy A new study by researchers from Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) and Chulalongkorn and Mahidol Universities in Bangkok, which was published in the journal PLOS ONE, found that the majority of Thai adults with diabetes were never diagnosed, but that most of those who were diagnosed did receive treatment and got the condition under control. The study focused on the strengths and weaknesses of diabetes care in Thailand's universal health system, using the 2014 Thai National Health Examination survey (NHES V), the largest cross-sectional, noninstitutionalized population representative survey in Thailand, completed every five years. TOPLINE DATA Of the 15,663 Thai adults included in the study, 8.8% appeared to have diabetes based on their blood samples and/or reporting being treated for diabetes. Of those who appeared to have diabetes, the researchers found that 67.0% reported ever being screened for diabetes, 34.0% reported being diagnosed, 33.3% had been treated, and 26.0% had their diabetes under control. KEY FINDINGS There were several key findings from the report. The researchers identified significant unmet need for diabetes care in the Thai adult population, with 74% of those with diabetes having an unmet need for care across levels of screening, diagnosis, treatment, or control. Additionally, the high unmet need for diabetes care was found to be largely attributable to loss at the stages of screening and diagnosis, which each contributed 33% to total unmet need. INISIGHTS & RECOMMENDATIONS The study highlighted the need for stronger investment to strengthen primary health care in Thailand. An independent assessment after a decade of the Thai Universal Coverage Scheme (UCS) indicated that the focus on curative care may have contributed to lower resources for public health functions. While several national policies to improve diabetes screening and care have been passed, and a dedicated “chronic care fund” was established under UCS to strengthen screening and primary care for diabetes and hypertension in 2011, large gaps remain in disease detection. Future steps might include expanding primary health care clinics and staff, in addition to auxiliary health providers like community pharmacists, who in prior studies have successfully managed diabetes and hypertension in conjunction with primary care providers.  Better health information systems that allow every Thai to access their personal health information, including diabetes risk and screening records, could also contribute to reducing unmet need. ON THE RECORD "Thai healthcare systems may have put emphasis on expanding coverage both in terms of population coverage and medical care benefit packages, which they did quite well with relatively low cost (and limited resources). Nevertheless, this paper highlights the importance of improving the quality of care, especially primary care and public health promotion and disease prevention," said study co-author Dr. Piya Hanvoravongchai, lecturer in the Department of Preventive and Social Medicine in the Faculty of Medicine at Chulalongkorn University in a statement. 

A new study by researchers from Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) and Chulalongkorn and Mahidol Universities in Bangkok, which was published in the journal PLOS ONE, found that the majority of Thai adults with diabetes were never diagnosed, but that most of those who were diagnosed did receive treatment and got the condition under control.

The study focused on the strengths and weaknesses of diabetes care in Thailand's universal health system, using the 2014 Thai National Health Examination survey (NHES V), the largest cross-sectional, noninstitutionalized population representative survey in Thailand, completed every five years.

TOPLINE DATA

Of the 15,663 Thai adults included in the study, 8.8% appeared to have diabetes based on their blood samples and/or reporting being treated for diabetes. Of those who appeared to have diabetes, the researchers found that 67.0% reported ever being screened for diabetes, 34.0% reported being diagnosed, 33.3% had been treated, and 26.0% had their diabetes under control.

KEY FINDINGS

There were several key findings from the report. The researchers identified significant unmet need for diabetes care in the Thai adult population, with 74% of those with diabetes having an unmet need for care across levels of screening, diagnosis, treatment, or control. Additionally, the high unmet need for diabetes care was found to be largely attributable to loss at the stages of screening and diagnosis, which each contributed 33% to total unmet need.

INISIGHTS & RECOMMENDATIONS

The study highlighted the need for stronger investment to strengthen primary health care in Thailand. An independent assessment after a decade of the Thai Universal Coverage Scheme (UCS) indicated that the focus on curative care may have contributed to lower resources for public health functions. While several national policies to improve diabetes screening and care have been passed, and a dedicated “chronic care fund” was established under UCS to strengthen screening and primary care for diabetes and hypertension in 2011, large gaps remain in disease detection.

Future steps might include expanding primary health care clinics and staff, in addition to auxiliary health providers like community pharmacists, who in prior studies have successfully managed diabetes and hypertension in conjunction with primary care providers. 

Better health information systems that allow every Thai to access their personal health information, including diabetes risk and screening records, could also contribute to reducing unmet need.

ON THE RECORD

"Thai healthcare systems may have put emphasis on expanding coverage both in terms of population coverage and medical care benefit packages, which they did quite well with relatively low cost (and limited resources). Nevertheless, this paper highlights the importance of improving the quality of care, especially primary care and public health promotion and disease prevention," said study co-author Dr. Piya Hanvoravongchai, lecturer in the Department of Preventive and Social Medicine in the Faculty of Medicine at Chulalongkorn University in a statement. 

]]>
Chief Data Officer Mona Siddiqui to depart HHS http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/chief-data-officer-mona-siddiqui-depart-hhs http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/chief-data-officer-mona-siddiqui-depart-hhs Fri, 17 Jan 2020 13:34:20 CST mmiliard at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy Dr. Mona Siddiqui, who has served for three years in the Office of the CTO at U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, announced this week that she would depart the agency as chief data officer. WHY IT MATTERS In a blog post, Siddiqui praised her HHS Data Team for helping realize and array of accomplishments over the past three years, including development of technology stack enabling wider data sharing across HHS, implementing a more refined approach to data governance and the launch of a data science and AI training program. More generally, she expressed thanks for the team's work with "a broad group of stakeholders to move the department forward in its strategy on opioids, AI, data privacy, collaboration with states and social determinants of health." THE LARGER TREND Speaking at the Health 2.0 Annual Conference in Santa Clara, California, this past September, Siddiqui gave a progress report on some of the agency's population-focused data innovations across 50 states and five territories. "The scope and scale of data which HHS is the steward of is enormous," she said. "The efforts that are undertaken by frontline staff every day to ensure that the right information is getting connected to address a public health crisis or to try and anticipate an emerging public health threat are herculean. I think it's not overstating it to say (that) connecting disparate information in these ways and deploying it, with partnerships with both public and private entities, is saving lives." ON THE RECORD On Twitter, HHS CTO Ed Simcox thanked Siddiqui for her work at the agency: It is bittersweet to announce that Mona Siddiqui is leaving HHS. While we will miss her greatly, she will continue to champion open data. Working with Mona has been a privilege. She leaves our data portfolio in a good place. https://t.co/KXmkimwBGg — Ed Simcox (@HHSCTO) January 16, 2020 Twitter: @MikeMiliardHITN Email the writer: mike.miliard@himssmedia.com Healthcare IT News is a publication of HIMSS Media.

Dr. Mona Siddiqui, who has served for three years in the Office of the CTO at U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, announced this week that she would depart the agency as chief data officer.

WHY IT MATTERS
In a blog post, Siddiqui praised her HHS Data Team for helping realize and array of accomplishments over the past three years, including development of technology stack enabling wider data sharing across HHS, implementing a more refined approach to data governance and the launch of a data science and AI training program.

More generally, she expressed thanks for the team's work with "a broad group of stakeholders to move the department forward in its strategy on opioids, AI, data privacy, collaboration with states and social determinants of health."

THE LARGER TREND
Speaking at the Health 2.0 Annual Conference in Santa Clara, California, this past September, Siddiqui gave a progress report on some of the agency's population-focused data innovations across 50 states and five territories.

"The scope and scale of data which HHS is the steward of is enormous," she said. "The efforts that are undertaken by frontline staff every day to ensure that the right information is getting connected to address a public health crisis or to try and anticipate an emerging public health threat are herculean. I think it's not overstating it to say (that) connecting disparate information in these ways and deploying it, with partnerships with both public and private entities, is saving lives."

ON THE RECORD
On Twitter, HHS CTO Ed Simcox thanked Siddiqui for her work at the agency:

It is bittersweet to announce that Mona Siddiqui is leaving HHS. While we will miss her greatly, she will continue to champion open data. Working with Mona has been a privilege. She leaves our data portfolio in a good place. https://t.co/KXmkimwBGg

— Ed Simcox (@HHSCTO) January 16, 2020

Twitter: @MikeMiliardHITN
Email the writer: mike.miliard@himssmedia.com

Healthcare IT News is a publication of HIMSS Media.

]]>
Patients with newly diagnosed musculoskeletal pain are prescribed opioids more often than recommended http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/patients-newly-diagnosed-musculoskeletal-pain-are-prescribed-opioids-more-often-recommended http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/patients-newly-diagnosed-musculoskeletal-pain-are-prescribed-opioids-more-often-recommended Thu, 16 Jan 2020 17:00:00 CST NIH News Release NIH study shows treatment recommendations impacted by patient and physician factors. ]]> Policy changes, AI, consumerism top interoperability trends for 2020 http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/policy-changes-ai-consumerism-top-interoperability-trends-2020 http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/policy-changes-ai-consumerism-top-interoperability-trends-2020 Thu, 16 Jan 2020 11:50:20 CST mmiliard at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy The new consumer-driven health information ecosystem is transforming the way health systems deliver care. As always, interoperability – be it among care teams or across disparate settings – is a key challenge. While major strides are being taken to improve the way medical data and electronic health records can be transferred, analyzed and shared, major hurdles to full interoperability remain, and will be a key development point in healthcare IT this year. "I see the barriers being the way standards are defined and implemented," James Lloyd, co-founder and CTO of Redox, told Healthcare IT News. "Currently, standards are intentionally customizable and extensible, and this flexibility leaves a lot of decision making to the implementers, namely EHR vendors, software vendors and health systems." Lloyd explained that from a business standpoint, the biggest change and pressure point for interoperability in 2020 will be the final rules expected soon from the Department of Health and Human Services on the information blocking prohibition in the 21st Century Cures Act. "Although no one is sure when this will officially be out, and companies are still trying to plan around the uncertainty," he said. "When the rule is passed, we'll see how it will impact the decision making of health systems, as well as how the government will enforce the rule. It needs teeth for health systems to change their behavior and buy in, but many questions remain pertaining to who will solve this." Niko Skievaski, Redox's co-founder and president, said in terms of two health systems sharing data, the core problem is the business model and thus adoption. "In a fee-for-service world, interoperability is difficult to execute. The economic incentives to share data does not align with the need for interoperability," he said. "In order for this to work, the industry must continue to shift to a value-based care model where the business incentives do align around interoperability as various care providers need to share data to better collaborate and reduce costs." Lloyd also noted an area that will drive a new type of interoperability are more diagnostic-type services moving into the hands of individuals: for example, mail order blood tests or colon cancer tests. "It is moving services away from a centralized location and centralized technology to these condition-specific technologies that are not immediately connected to the four walls of a health system," he noted. "This drives the importance of interoperability." Skievaski said as developers begin producing apps, more data will be freed from silos and flow to patients, and these apps will come to life with the emergence of a mandate for patient-directed access to data and data exchange. "We need a killer app to drive patient and health system demand for interoperability," he said. "This kind of app should bring value to consumers that it becomes indispensable." George Gray, chief technology officer and vice president of research and development at Ivenix, said in 2020, bidirectional integration will continue to gain adoption – but not without some bumps and bruises. "We'll also continue to see AI advance in healthcare around the diagnosis of disease and other medical conditions that lend themselves well to pattern matching," he said. "I expect to start seeing more AI capabilities built into patient monitoring solutions both inside and outside the hospital in 2020." He also noted that while vendors and healthcare systems are all in agreement that adopting interoperability is important, until vendors offer or provide the level of interfaces needed to become truly interoperable, progress of interoperability will stall. "This means vendors must continue to innovate and make their products better," Gray said. "In the future, integration and interoperability with the devices that they are connected to will be a growing pain point throughout the healthcare industry." Nathan Eddy is a healthcare and technology freelancer based in Berlin. Email the writer: nathaneddy@gmail.com Twitter: @dropdeaded209

The new consumer-driven health information ecosystem is transforming the way health systems deliver care. As always, interoperability – be it among care teams or across disparate settings – is a key challenge.

While major strides are being taken to improve the way medical data and electronic health records can be transferred, analyzed and shared, major hurdles to full interoperability remain, and will be a key development point in healthcare IT this year.

"I see the barriers being the way standards are defined and implemented," James Lloyd, co-founder and CTO of Redox, told Healthcare IT News.

"Currently, standards are intentionally customizable and extensible, and this flexibility leaves a lot of decision making to the implementers, namely EHR vendors, software vendors and health systems."

Lloyd explained that from a business standpoint, the biggest change and pressure point for interoperability in 2020 will be the final rules expected soon from the Department of Health and Human Services on the information blocking prohibition in the 21st Century Cures Act.

"Although no one is sure when this will officially be out, and companies are still trying to plan around the uncertainty," he said.

"When the rule is passed, we'll see how it will impact the decision making of health systems, as well as how the government will enforce the rule. It needs teeth for health systems to change their behavior and buy in, but many questions remain pertaining to who will solve this."

Niko Skievaski, Redox's co-founder and president, said in terms of two health systems sharing data, the core problem is the business model and thus adoption.

"In a fee-for-service world, interoperability is difficult to execute. The economic incentives to share data does not align with the need for interoperability," he said.

"In order for this to work, the industry must continue to shift to a value-based care model where the business incentives do align around interoperability as various care providers need to share data to better collaborate and reduce costs."

Lloyd also noted an area that will drive a new type of interoperability are more diagnostic-type services moving into the hands of individuals: for example, mail order blood tests or colon cancer tests.

"It is moving services away from a centralized location and centralized technology to these condition-specific technologies that are not immediately connected to the four walls of a health system," he noted. "This drives the importance of interoperability."

Skievaski said as developers begin producing apps, more data will be freed from silos and flow to patients, and these apps will come to life with the emergence of a mandate for patient-directed access to data and data exchange.

"We need a killer app to drive patient and health system demand for interoperability," he said. "This kind of app should bring value to consumers that it becomes indispensable."

George Gray, chief technology officer and vice president of research and development at Ivenix, said in 2020, bidirectional integration will continue to gain adoption – but not without some bumps and bruises.

"We'll also continue to see AI advance in healthcare around the diagnosis of disease and other medical conditions that lend themselves well to pattern matching," he said. "I expect to start seeing more AI capabilities built into patient monitoring solutions both inside and outside the hospital in 2020."

He also noted that while vendors and healthcare systems are all in agreement that adopting interoperability is important, until vendors offer or provide the level of interfaces needed to become truly interoperable, progress of interoperability will stall.

"This means vendors must continue to innovate and make their products better," Gray said. "In the future, integration and interoperability with the devices that they are connected to will be a growing pain point throughout the healthcare industry."

Nathan Eddy is a healthcare and technology freelancer based in Berlin.
Email the writer: nathaneddy@gmail.com
Twitter: @dropdeaded209

]]>
Panel identifies need for improved implementation of preventive services and reduced health disparities http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/panel-identifies-need-improved-implementation-preventive-services-reduced-health-disparities http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/panel-identifies-need-improved-implementation-preventive-services-reduced-health-disparities Wed, 15 Jan 2020 16:00:00 CST NIH News Release Scientists urged to engage stakeholders inside and outside the health care system. ]]> ONC unveils draft Federal Health IT Strategic Plan http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/onc-unveils-draft-federal-health-it-strategic-plan http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/onc-unveils-draft-federal-health-it-strategic-plan Wed, 15 Jan 2020 10:53:43 CST mmiliard at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has published the draft 2020-2025 Federal Health IT Strategic Plan, developed for HHS by the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT, and is making it available for public comment until March 18. WHY IT MATTERS The draft lays out goals and objectives for federal health IT efforts to ensure patients have access to their electronic health information. The final 2020-2025 plan will serve as a roadmap for federal agencies and drive private sector alignment,  officials say. Agencies will use it to allocate resources, coordinate health IT efforts across agencies, signal priorities to the private sector and benchmark progress over time. Tthe strategic plan explains how the U.S. government will use technology to: Promote health and wellness; Enhance the delivery and experience of care; Build a secure, data-driven culture to accelerate research and innovation; and Connect healthcare and health data through an interoperable health IT infrastructure. THE LARGER TREND HHS emphasizes that patients' right to access and control of their health information is a key component of their right to control their health. While the majority of healthcare providers now use EHRs, the data that's in them often remains inaccessible to patients, caregivers and healthcare providers across different settings. The new-five year strategic plan aligns with the forthcoming interoperability and patient access rules, expected from ONC and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services in the coming weeks. ON THE RECORD "The Federal Health IT Strategic Plan represents the work being done, collectively and individually, to help ensure that patients and their providers can electronically access the health information they need to help them manage their care," said Lauren Thompson, Interoperability Director for the Federal Electronic Health Record Modernization Program Office. "The draft federal strategic plan supports the provisions in the 21st Century Cures Act that will help to bring electronic health information into the hands of patients through smartphone applications," said Don Rucker, M.D. "We look forward to public comment to help guide the federal government's strategy to have a more connected health system that better serves patients." Twitter: @MikeMiliardHITN Email the writer: mike.miliard@himssmedia.com Healthcare IT News is a publication of HIMSS Media.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has published the draft 2020-2025 Federal Health IT Strategic Plan, developed for HHS by the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT, and is making it available for public comment until March 18.

WHY IT MATTERS
The draft lays out goals and objectives for federal health IT efforts to ensure patients have access to their electronic health information.

The final 2020-2025 plan will serve as a roadmap for federal agencies and drive private sector alignment,  officials say. Agencies will use it to allocate resources, coordinate health IT efforts across agencies, signal priorities to the private sector and benchmark progress over time.

Tthe strategic plan explains how the U.S. government will use technology to:

  1. Promote health and wellness;
  2. Enhance the delivery and experience of care;
  3. Build a secure, data-driven culture to accelerate research and innovation; and
  4. Connect healthcare and health data through an interoperable health IT infrastructure.

THE LARGER TREND
HHS emphasizes that patients' right to access and control of their health information is a key component of their right to control their health.

While the majority of healthcare providers now use EHRs, the data that's in them often remains inaccessible to patients, caregivers and healthcare providers across different settings.

The new-five year strategic plan aligns with the forthcoming interoperability and patient access rules, expected from ONC and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services in the coming weeks.

ON THE RECORD
"The Federal Health IT Strategic Plan represents the work being done, collectively and individually, to help ensure that patients and their providers can electronically access the health information they need to help them manage their care," said Lauren Thompson, Interoperability Director for the Federal Electronic Health Record Modernization Program Office.

"The draft federal strategic plan supports the provisions in the 21st Century Cures Act that will help to bring electronic health information into the hands of patients through smartphone applications," said Don Rucker, M.D. "We look forward to public comment to help guide the federal government's strategy to have a more connected health system that better serves patients."

Twitter: @MikeMiliardHITN
Email the writer: mike.miliard@himssmedia.com

Healthcare IT News is a publication of HIMSS Media.

]]>
UK needs bold response to future healthcare challenges http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/video/asia-pacific/uk-needs-bold-response-future-healthcare-challenges http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/video/asia-pacific/uk-needs-bold-response-future-healthcare-challenges Fri, 10 Jan 2020 16:00:00 CST rickdagley at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy Primary topic: Government & PolicyDisable Auto Tagging: Short Headline: UK needs bold response to future healthcare challengesFeatured Decision Content: Region Tag: Asia Pacific
Primary topic: 
Disable Auto Tagging: 
Short Headline: 
UK needs bold response to future healthcare challenges
Featured Decision Content: 
Region Tag: 
Asia Pacific
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Alcohol-related deaths increasing in the United States http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/alcohol-related-deaths-increasing-united-states http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/alcohol-related-deaths-increasing-united-states Fri, 10 Jan 2020 14:30:00 CST NIH News Release An analysis of U.S. death certificate data found that nearly 1 million people died from alcohol-related causes between 1999 and 2017. ]]> FDA real-world evidence to be made available on Google Cloud http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/fda-real-world-evidence-be-made-available-google-cloud http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/fda-real-world-evidence-be-made-available-google-cloud Wed, 08 Jan 2020 13:48:53 CST mmiliard at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy Google announced this week that it will make the U.S. Food & Drug Administration's open-source MyStudies platform available on the Google Cloud Platform. WHY IT MATTERS The goal, said Jameson Rogers, product manager at Google Cloud Healthcare & Life Sciences, is "stimulate an open ecosystem that will improve the ability of organizations to perform research that leads to better patient outcomes. FDA's ongoing prioritization of real-world evidence means that "drug and device organizations are increasingly looking to incorporate patient-generated data into regulatory submissions for new products and treatment indications," as Rogers explained in a blog post. To help researchers manage and submit that vast and disparate data, in a secure and compliant manner, FDA developed the open-source MyStudies – a platform aimed at helping drug, biologic and device organizations with the collecting and reporting of real-world data for regulatory submissions. Rogers said Google Cloud is working to expand the MyStudies platform with new security and configurable privacy controls, offering the the ability for research organizations to detect and personally identifying information. That means, he said, that "when an organization deploys FDA MyStudies on Google Cloud, a unique and logically isolated instance of the platform is created that only that organization and its delegates are authorized to access." This in turn will "allow a research organization to select which of its researchers and clinicians are able to access what data, and to help optimize the use of that data as directed by participants," said Rogers. "By leveraging Google Cloud as the underlying infrastructure for their FDA MyStudies deployments, organizations will have more safeguards in the ownership and management of data in their studies." THE LARGER TREND As part of the initiative, Google will bring MyHeart Counts, a cardiovascular research study run by Stanford University, onto the FDA's platform. So far, that project has enrolled more than 60,000 participants and enabled deeper understanding of the feasibility of conducting large-scale, smartphone-based clinical trials, Rogers notes. "Once enrolled, participants are asked survey questions related to their health and physical activity," he explained. "Participants may allow MyHeart Counts to collect physical activity data from their phone and other wearable devices. If participants are physically able, they will be asked to perform a 6-minute walk test, then enter information about risk factors and blood tests, which is used to determine a cardiovascular risk score." Until now, however, those participants were all iOS users: MyHeart Counts was launched in 2015 as part of the first groups of iOS research apps. But by enabling its availability through MyStudies, Google Cloud will help researchers expand their insights by enabling enrollment of both Android and iOS users. ON THE RECORD "Consistent with our obligations under the 21st Century Cures Act, FDA engages in public-private demonstration projects to advance the regulatory science around real-world evidence," explained Dr. David Martin, associate director for real-world evidence analytics at FDA's Office of Medical Policy. "The Patient Centered Outcomes Research Trust Fund investment that launched FDA MyStudies is a step toward this goal." While FDA MyStudies is publicly available, "it requires professional expertise and time to progress from open-source resources to deployment of a new re-branded platform," he said. "Google Cloud is taking these resources and creating a click-to-deploy option linked to additional health data management and analytics." "MyHeart Counts and digital apps like it allow experts to connect directly to patients in a way that’s more immediate and more extensive, through direct, sensor-based measurement collection," said Euan Ashley, professor of medicine, of genetics and of biomedical data science at Stanford. "Google Cloud’s support of these efforts not only helps researchers organize and deploy important research programs faster and more reliably, but ultimately will help patients and doctors notice health issues early, so they can address them sooner." Twitter: @MikeMiliardHITN Email the writer: mike.miliard@himssmedia.com Healthcare IT News is a publication of HIMSS Media.

Google announced this week that it will make the U.S. Food & Drug Administration's open-source MyStudies platform available on the Google Cloud Platform.

WHY IT MATTERS
The goal, said Jameson Rogers, product manager at Google Cloud Healthcare & Life Sciences, is "stimulate an open ecosystem that will improve the ability of organizations to perform research that leads to better patient outcomes.

FDA's ongoing prioritization of real-world evidence means that "drug and device organizations are increasingly looking to incorporate patient-generated data into regulatory submissions for new products and treatment indications," as Rogers explained in a blog post.

To help researchers manage and submit that vast and disparate data, in a secure and compliant manner, FDA developed the open-source MyStudies – a platform aimed at helping drug, biologic and device organizations with the collecting and reporting of real-world data for regulatory submissions.

Rogers said Google Cloud is working to expand the MyStudies platform with new security and configurable privacy controls, offering the the ability for research organizations to detect and personally identifying information.

That means, he said, that "when an organization deploys FDA MyStudies on Google Cloud, a unique and logically isolated instance of the platform is created that only that organization and its delegates are authorized to access."

This in turn will "allow a research organization to select which of its researchers and clinicians are able to access what data, and to help optimize the use of that data as directed by participants," said Rogers. "By leveraging Google Cloud as the underlying infrastructure for their FDA MyStudies deployments, organizations will have more safeguards in the ownership and management of data in their studies."

THE LARGER TREND
As part of the initiative, Google will bring MyHeart Counts, a cardiovascular research study run by Stanford University, onto the FDA's platform. So far, that project has enrolled more than 60,000 participants and enabled deeper understanding of the feasibility of conducting large-scale, smartphone-based clinical trials, Rogers notes.

"Once enrolled, participants are asked survey questions related to their health and physical activity," he explained. "Participants may allow MyHeart Counts to collect physical activity data from their phone and other wearable devices. If participants are physically able, they will be asked to perform a 6-minute walk test, then enter information about risk factors and blood tests, which is used to determine a cardiovascular risk score."

Until now, however, those participants were all iOS users: MyHeart Counts was launched in 2015 as part of the first groups of iOS research apps. But by enabling its availability through MyStudies, Google Cloud will help researchers expand their insights by enabling enrollment of both Android and iOS users.

ON THE RECORD
"Consistent with our obligations under the 21st Century Cures Act, FDA engages in public-private demonstration projects to advance the regulatory science around real-world evidence," explained Dr. David Martin, associate director for real-world evidence analytics at FDA's Office of Medical Policy. "The Patient Centered Outcomes Research Trust Fund investment that launched FDA MyStudies is a step toward this goal."

While FDA MyStudies is publicly available, "it requires professional expertise and time to progress from open-source resources to deployment of a new re-branded platform," he said. "Google Cloud is taking these resources and creating a click-to-deploy option linked to additional health data management and analytics."

"MyHeart Counts and digital apps like it allow experts to connect directly to patients in a way that’s more immediate and more extensive, through direct, sensor-based measurement collection," said Euan Ashley, professor of medicine, of genetics and of biomedical data science at Stanford. "Google Cloud’s support of these efforts not only helps researchers organize and deploy important research programs faster and more reliably, but ultimately will help patients and doctors notice health issues early, so they can address them sooner."

Twitter: @MikeMiliardHITN
Email the writer: mike.miliard@himssmedia.com

Healthcare IT News is a publication of HIMSS Media.

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Digital health roadmap to improving care http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/video/australia/digital-health-roadmap-improving-care http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/video/australia/digital-health-roadmap-improving-care Tue, 07 Jan 2020 14:45:26 CST rickdagley at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy Primary topic: WorkforceDisable Auto Tagging: Short Headline: Digital health roadmap to improving careFeatured Decision Content: Region Tag: Australia
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Healthcare UK promoting the best of British healthcare globally http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/video/europe/healthcare-uk-promoting-best-british-healthcare-globally http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/video/europe/healthcare-uk-promoting-best-british-healthcare-globally Mon, 06 Jan 2020 11:00:00 CST rickdagley at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy Primary topic: Connected HealthDisable Auto Tagging: Short Headline: Healthcare UK promoting the best of British healthcare globallyFeatured Decision Content: Region Tag: Europe/UK
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Physicians should think twice about promoting medical credit cards to their patients http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/finance-experts-warn-medical-credit-cards?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/finance-experts-warn-medical-credit-cards?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Tue, 20 Feb 2018 10:15:20 CST Joanne Finnegan at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Consumers use credit cards to pay for everything (including the kitchen sink), and the latest trend has people using medical credit cards to pay for healthcare services. But financial experts are warning practices about the pitfalls of promoting so-called medical credit cards to their patients, says the Healthcare Financial Management Association. Trump administration issues proposed rule to expand short-term insurance plans http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/trump-administration-short-term-insurance-rule?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/trump-administration-short-term-insurance-rule?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Tue, 20 Feb 2018 09:56:31 CST Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare A proposed rule issued by three federal agencies on Tuesday would expand limits for short-term health insurance plans from three months to 12 months. CMS's Seema Verma dismissed concerns that the policy shift would destabilize the individual market by siphoning off healthy individuals, arguing the change will have "virtually no impact" on ACA premiums. Under Trump, HHS rolls back policies aimed at protecting LGBT rights http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/trump-hhs-lgbt-rights-alex-azar?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/trump-hhs-lgbt-rights-alex-azar?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Tue, 20 Feb 2018 09:31:52 CST Leslie Small at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Though President Donald Trump promised to support LGBT causes during the 2016 campaign, under his watch the Department of Health and Human Services had rolled back several initiatives aimed at protecting the rights of that population. New HHS Secretary Alex Azar could take the department in a different direction. Study: Community navigators can reduce the high cost of 'superusers' in hospital settings http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/patient-engagement/community-navigators-superusers-hospital-visits-decrease?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/patient-engagement/community-navigators-superusers-hospital-visits-decrease?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Tue, 20 Feb 2018 09:08:46 CST Paige Minemyer at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare "Superusers," those costly patients who utilize high levels of hospital care, are a significant burden on the healthcare system. But a new study suggests that pairing them with community navigators can reduce their use of hospital services. Researchers in Tennessee found that the intervention reduced their healthcare encounters by 39%. Patients lack information about imaging exams, study finds http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/patients-lack-information-imaging-exams-radiology-study-yale?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/patients-lack-information-imaging-exams-radiology-study-yale?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Sat, 17 Feb 2018 20:14:46 CST Joanne Finnegan at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Doctors can do a better job providing patients with information before they go for an imaging exam, a new study found. One in five patients shows up for an imaging exam without any information about the test they are about to undergo, according to the study published in Radiology. Most for-profit hospitals will benefit from U.S. tax overhaul, but 2 big-name providers stand to gain the most http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/most-for-profit-hospitals-will-benefit-from-us-tax-overhaul-but-two-big-name-providers?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/most-for-profit-hospitals-will-benefit-from-us-tax-overhaul-but-two-big-name-providers?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 16 Feb 2018 15:23:18 CST Ilene MacDonald at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Most for-profit hospitals stand to gain from the changes to the U.S. tax laws, according to a new Moody’s Investors Service report. But HCA Healthcare and Universal Health Service will be the biggest beneficiaries and could see their operating cash flows go up by 10% or more. North Carolina attorney general seeks more details on Atrium Health-UNC Health Care merger  http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/atrium-health-university-north-carolina-merger-ag-wants-details?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/atrium-health-university-north-carolina-merger-ag-wants-details?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 16 Feb 2018 15:12:13 CST Paige Minemyer at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare North Carolina's attorney general is asking Atrium Health and UNC Health Care to provide more information on their merger plans. AG Josh Stein said he intends to ensure that the planned merger doesn't increase patient costs. 5 medical conditions that cost more than $15K per hospital stay http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/5-medical-conditions-cost-more-than-15k-per-hospital-stay?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/5-medical-conditions-cost-more-than-15k-per-hospital-stay?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 16 Feb 2018 14:01:34 CST Ilene MacDonald at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Heart valve disorders lead the list of the most expensive medical conditions with the highest average cost per inpatient stay, according to an analysis by Business Insider based on 2016 data from Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project. Heart valve disorders, on average, cost $41,878 per stay, the analysis found. Anthem alters controversial ER coverage policies http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/anthem-er-coverage-policy-changes?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/anthem-er-coverage-policy-changes?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 16 Feb 2018 11:50:13 CST Leslie Small at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Seeking to address mounting concerns from providers and other stakeholders, Anthem has made changes to policies it previously rolled out that restrict coverage for emergency room visits. The insurer has implemented a series of “always pay” exceptions for certain circumstances, like when the patient received any kind of surgery or an MRI or CT scan. VA head Shulkin to reimburse disputed European travel expenses, but Dems call for hearing over controversy http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/healthcare/va-head-s-european-trip-drama-continues-shulkin-will-reimburse-disputed-expenses-but-won?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/healthcare/va-head-s-european-trip-drama-continues-shulkin-will-reimburse-disputed-expenses-but-won?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 16 Feb 2018 10:30:06 CST Ilene MacDonald at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Veterans Affairs Secretary David Shulkin, M.D., says he will reimburse travel expenses that were the subject of an internal investigation into a trip he took to Europe this summer, but that may not put an end to the controversy. One lawmaker has called for Shulkin’s resignation, and four Democrats have requested a hearing about the trip.