MedClimate Health News Daily http://medclimate.com/feed en-us Copyright MedClimate, Inc2019 NIH announces funding awards for national early psychosis learning community http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-announces-funding-awards-national-early-psychosis-learning-community http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-announces-funding-awards-national-early-psychosis-learning-community Fri, 20 Sep 2019 14:00:00 CDT NIH News Release NIH-funded research projects aim to improve quality of care and patient outcomes while speeding advances in early psychosis services and science. ]]> 3M and M*Modal launch new AI-powered CDI tool http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/3m-and-mmodal-launch-new-ai-powered-cdi-tool http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/3m-and-mmodal-launch-new-ai-powered-cdi-tool Fri, 20 Sep 2019 11:53:46 CDT at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com For their first new post-acquisition technology, 3M Health Information Systems and M*Modal have unveiled a clinical documentation improvement tool that uses artificial intelligence to boost speed and efficiency for clinicians and coders. Pop health IT helps Partners in Recovery reduce psychiatric hospital admissions by 50% http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/pop-health-it-helps-partners-recovery-reduce-psychiatric-hospital-admissions-50 http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/pop-health-it-helps-partners-recovery-reduce-psychiatric-hospital-admissions-50 Fri, 20 Sep 2019 10:43:39 CDT at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com Combining psychiatric and primary care data, including social determinants of health, has also helped reduce ER spending from $2,265 per patient per month to just $875. The brain may actively forget during dream sleep http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/brain-may-actively-forget-during-dream-sleep http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/brain-may-actively-forget-during-dream-sleep Thu, 19 Sep 2019 19:30:00 CDT NIH News Release NIH-funded study suggests REM sleep may prevent information overload. ]]> ALS gene may be a hitchhiker’s guide to the neuron http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/als-gene-may-be-hitchhikers-guide-neuron http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/als-gene-may-be-hitchhikers-guide-neuron Thu, 19 Sep 2019 17:30:00 CDT NIH News Release NIH-funded study suggests a new pathway for treatments. ]]> NIH awards $20 million over five years to bring together music therapy and neuroscience http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-awards-20-million-over-five-years-bring-together-music-therapy-neuroscience http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-awards-20-million-over-five-years-bring-together-music-therapy-neuroscience Thu, 19 Sep 2019 15:00:00 CDT NIH News Release Research builds on the Sound Health Initiative, an NIH-Kennedy Center partnership in association with the National Endowment for the Arts. ]]> NIH to investigate minor cannabinoids and terpenes for potential pain-relieving properties http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-investigate-minor-cannabinoids-terpenes-potential-pain-relieving-properties http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-investigate-minor-cannabinoids-terpenes-potential-pain-relieving-properties Thu, 19 Sep 2019 14:00:00 CDT NIH News Release Despite a lack of robust evidence, cannabinoids—such as CBD—are often assumed to be safe and effective. ]]> Focus on operational efficiency and RTLS technology has given Wake Forest Baptist Health a financial leg up http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/focus-operational-efficiency-and-rtls-technology-has-given-wake-forest-baptist-health-financial http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/focus-operational-efficiency-and-rtls-technology-has-given-wake-forest-baptist-health-financial Thu, 19 Sep 2019 11:08:20 CDT at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com Real-time tracking technologies allow the organization to monitor everything from patients to medical equipment. Rush, Ochsner Health System partner on telemedicine, Epic EHR http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/rush-ochsner-health-system-partner-telemedicine-epic-ehr http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/rush-ochsner-health-system-partner-telemedicine-epic-ehr Thu, 19 Sep 2019 10:54:32 CDT at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com Telehealth will enable specialist interventions, while the EHR will allow patients to see their healthcare information from both organizations while streamlining care coordination and more. How one provider org used SDOH, analytics and texting to help reduce pre-term births http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/how-one-provider-org-used-sdoh-analytics-and-texting-help-reduce-pre-term-births http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/how-one-provider-org-used-sdoh-analytics-and-texting-help-reduce-pre-term-births Thu, 19 Sep 2019 10:01:27 CDT at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com The Parkland Center for Clinical Innovation increased prenatal visit attendance by 24%, reduced early preterm delivery by 27%, and reduced first-year baby costs by 54%. 10-hospital health system adds evidence-based clinical decision support tech http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/10-hospital-health-system-adds-evidence-based-clinical-decision-support-tech http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/10-hospital-health-system-adds-evidence-based-clinical-decision-support-tech Thu, 19 Sep 2019 04:11:55 CDT at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com The clinical pathways system is designed to help make appropriate decisions related to specific clinical questions. The drug tool is designed to help pharmacists, physicians and nurses with access to point-of-care drug information. Teen e-cigarette use doubles since 2017 http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/teen-e-cigarette-use-doubles-since-2017 http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/teen-e-cigarette-use-doubles-since-2017 Wed, 18 Sep 2019 21:00:00 CDT NIH News Release Researchers sound alarm on potential health effects of vaping. ]]> NYU Langone Health implements randomized quality tests http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/nyu-langone-health-implements-randomized-quality-tests http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/nyu-langone-health-implements-randomized-quality-tests Wed, 18 Sep 2019 20:10:36 CDT at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com The goal is to run dozens of such quality improvement projects each year and to ultimately make randomization standard practice for the continual improvement of existing and new programs. Mayo Clinic CIO: 'This artificial intelligence stuff is real' http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/mayo-clinic-cio-artificial-intelligence-stuff-real http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/mayo-clinic-cio-artificial-intelligence-stuff-real Wed, 18 Sep 2019 19:56:41 CDT at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com "And it is coming quickly to a care setting near you," said Cris Ross at Health 2.0 on Tuesday, touting "small AI and big AI" tools that can help revamp IT systems to improve the experience of clinicians and patients alike. How cloud hosting can help with management of SDOH data http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/how-cloud-hosting-can-help-management-sdoh-data http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/how-cloud-hosting-can-help-management-sdoh-data Wed, 18 Sep 2019 14:41:14 CDT at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com Two consultants explain how the agility of remote hosting can boost readiness for social determinant of health initiatives – and spotlight the privacy and security concerns that must be prioritized. Study quantifies impact of NIH-sponsored trials on clinical cancer care http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/study-quantifies-impact-nih-sponsored-trials-clinical-cancer-care http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/study-quantifies-impact-nih-sponsored-trials-clinical-cancer-care Wed, 18 Sep 2019 14:00:00 CDT NIH News Release Researchers found trials add value regardless of whether findings were positive or negative. ]]> Novant Health taps Jvion as first partner for its new AI institute http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/novant-health-taps-jvion-first-partner-its-new-ai-institute http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/novant-health-taps-jvion-first-partner-its-new-ai-institute Wed, 18 Sep 2019 13:25:19 CDT at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com The prescriptive analytics company will start by helping researchers the Novant Health Institute of Innovation & Artificial Intelligence reduce readmissions for congestive heart failure. Mesh implants have similar outcomes to hysterectomy for vaginal prolapse repair http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/mesh-implants-have-similar-outcomes-hysterectomy-vaginal-prolapse-repair http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/mesh-implants-have-similar-outcomes-hysterectomy-vaginal-prolapse-repair Tue, 17 Sep 2019 15:00:00 CDT NIH News Release NIH-supported clinical study will continue to follow patients for five-year outcomes ]]> Surgery may benefit women with two types of urinary incontinence http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/surgery-may-benefit-women-two-types-urinary-incontinence http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/surgery-may-benefit-women-two-types-urinary-incontinence Tue, 17 Sep 2019 15:00:00 CDT NIH News Release NIH-funded study contrasts with current treatment guidelines. ]]> NIH-funded study suggests teen girl ‘night owls’ may be more likely to gain weight http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-funded-study-suggests-teen-girl-night-owls-may-be-more-likely-gain-weight http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-funded-study-suggests-teen-girl-night-owls-may-be-more-likely-gain-weight Mon, 16 Sep 2019 19:15:00 CDT NIH News Release Researchers estimated the children’s social jet lag — the difference between their weeknight and weekend bedtimes. ]]> Clinician burnout: Physicians name the technologies they think could best solve it http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/clinician-burnout-physicians-name-technologies-they-think-could-best-solve-it http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/clinician-burnout-physicians-name-technologies-they-think-could-best-solve-it Mon, 16 Sep 2019 17:56:40 CDT mmiliard at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy SANTA CLARA – At Health 2.0 on Monday, National Coordinator for Health IT Dr. Don Rucker listed a litany of challenges faced daily by physicians and nurses, and contributing to the ongoing scourge of clinician burnout: onerous documentation requirements, boilerplate electronic health records and the "monster burdens" of prior authorization and compliance with too many overlapping quality measures. A lot of people single out suboptimal EHR experience as as root cause of the burnout epidemic, and it certainly is one of them. But "burnout is multifactorial," said Dr. Michael Pfeffer, chief information officer at UCLA Health. It can be caused by EHR frustrations, admin burdens, regulatory headaches, malpractice concerns and the rise of consumerism: Pfeffer says he hears often from physicians dismayed by poor online reviews from patients that they're powerless to fix. Ultimately, burnout is about "loss of control," added HIMSS Chief Clinical Officer, Dr. Charles Alessi. The EHR may have become the "epithet to hang everything on," he said, but this deep satisfaction among so many clinicians has a wide array of contributing factors. Technology is one of them. But it can also be a "force for good," said Rucker. So Glenn Winokur, managing director of Healthbox asked his co-panelists: "If you could wave a magic wand, what do you think could be the biggest technology solution to the clinician burnout problem we're facing?" Alessi pointed to tech that could enable the concept of "precision health – and by that I mean the obverse of precision medicine," he said. "That means creating a situation where we're managing wellness as well as we're managing illness – precisely, digitally and directly with individuals," he said. "Because that way, we'll have a really activated population, into which we then deploy the single thing, which is clinical decision support systems right inside the EHRs, and right inside the clinical flow." For his part, Pfeffer said that, "given where we are today" with the realities of documentation requirements, his pick would be "really accurate voice transcription tools." He set the scene: "You have a device in the room. You're having a conversation with the patient, and it writes the note. So you can be face to face, but talking to the electronic health record." Some of that exists now, of course, but truly hands-free, comprehensive, error-proof voice documentation is "still years and years away," he said. "It's very, very complex. But that would be such a huge win for the physician-patient relationship, which is the key to all of this. Anything we can do from a technology standpoint to bring that relationship back, is so key." Lisa Grisim, RN, associate CIO at Stanford Children's Health, meanwhile, also put "great voice recognition and natural language processing" at the top of her list. "The physician would be talking to the patient and the note would be documented for them: they could talk about the orders they would have and the orders would be placed for them, they could be talking about a follow-up visit and what time would be best for that patient and a visit would get scheduled for them." Another pie-in-the-sky wish, she said, would be "the ability for a provider to just quickly get the clinical history of a patient. If they're seeing someone they haven't seen before, just having some way to pull together that clinical history: the pertinent thing a clinician would like to have right in front of them. EHRs have a ton of data, and surfing through that data to try to get to the story of the patient." Rethinking the EHR for a networked era Rucker, for his part, said more can be done to capitalize on network effects to improve the lives of providers and patients alike. "Our world has been transformed by networks," he said. "Metcalfe's law is the law of future generations in healthcare, getting that seamless integration. I'm in a lucky position to be working on APIs at ONC, moving that along and making it truly seamless, across sites of service, across vendors. It should not just be big expensive delivery systems sharing information with themselves. There should be something that is truly pro-consumer, pro-competitive. So moving that along is atop my wish list, and I'm pleased as punch to say I think we are making measurable and rapid progress." As for EHRs, which are great for automating billing but not so much for developing patient and clinician workflow, Winokur asked whether they should be "completely reimagined, reenvisioned, somehow, some way, from a completely different paradigm." EHRs have indeed evolved over the past 30 years as a "tool for billing and documentation," said Rucker. "There's been piecework automation, computerized provider order entry being the most notable. But, frankly, if our automation is what it is – that we slap ourselves on the back that we can get lab results back, or maybe an image – y'know, to be able to retrieve a fact from a database is sort of a yawner in the rest of the economy. That's sort of a given, rather than the blessed event it seems to be in healthcare." He said we need starting think instead about EHRs – "and again, maybe this means new vendors, new APIs, new modes of thinking about it" – as something more akin to enterprise resource planning systems. "Things need to be instrumented, automated – and there is tons to automate," said Rucker. "A lot of our lack of automation now is handled by the telephone. When I was at Ohio State, we had 130,000 phone calls a day. Of those calls, half were one minute or left, with a median duration of 27 seconds. So, 65,000 calls a day where one fact was exchanged in a 27-second call. Much of this activity was centered on the nursing units." In other words, "there is a vast opportunity," he said. "If you're exchanging one byte of information, as it were, that can almost certainly be a rich and ripe target for automation, with all the safety, cost and consumer value that brings. So I think one of the next-generation activities is going to be to think of EHRs as ERP systems, and we are doing our darndest (at ONC) to take the incentive to use them as documentation and billing adjuncts out of the equation."   Twitter: @MikeMiliardHITN Email the writer: mike.miliard@himssmedia.com Healthcare IT News is a publication of HIMSS Media.

SANTA CLARA – At Health 2.0 on Monday, National Coordinator for Health IT Dr. Don Rucker listed a litany of challenges faced daily by physicians and nurses, and contributing to the ongoing scourge of clinician burnout: onerous documentation requirements, boilerplate electronic health records and the "monster burdens" of prior authorization and compliance with too many overlapping quality measures.

A lot of people single out suboptimal EHR experience as as root cause of the burnout epidemic, and it certainly is one of them. But "burnout is multifactorial," said Dr. Michael Pfeffer, chief information officer at UCLA Health.

It can be caused by EHR frustrations, admin burdens, regulatory headaches, malpractice concerns and the rise of consumerism: Pfeffer says he hears often from physicians dismayed by poor online reviews from patients that they're powerless to fix.

Ultimately, burnout is about "loss of control," added HIMSS Chief Clinical Officer, Dr. Charles Alessi. The EHR may have become the "epithet to hang everything on," he said, but this deep satisfaction among so many clinicians has a wide array of contributing factors.

Technology is one of them. But it can also be a "force for good," said Rucker.

So Glenn Winokur, managing director of Healthbox asked his co-panelists: "If you could wave a magic wand, what do you think could be the biggest technology solution to the clinician burnout problem we're facing?"

Alessi pointed to tech that could enable the concept of "precision health – and by that I mean the obverse of precision medicine," he said.

"That means creating a situation where we're managing wellness as well as we're managing illness – precisely, digitally and directly with individuals," he said. "Because that way, we'll have a really activated population, into which we then deploy the single thing, which is clinical decision support systems right inside the EHRs, and right inside the clinical flow."

For his part, Pfeffer said that, "given where we are today" with the realities of documentation requirements, his pick would be "really accurate voice transcription tools."

He set the scene: "You have a device in the room. You're having a conversation with the patient, and it writes the note. So you can be face to face, but talking to the electronic health record."

Some of that exists now, of course, but truly hands-free, comprehensive, error-proof voice documentation is "still years and years away," he said. "It's very, very complex. But that would be such a huge win for the physician-patient relationship, which is the key to all of this. Anything we can do from a technology standpoint to bring that relationship back, is so key."

Lisa Grisim, RN, associate CIO at Stanford Children's Health, meanwhile, also put "great voice recognition and natural language processing" at the top of her list.

"The physician would be talking to the patient and the note would be documented for them: they could talk about the orders they would have and the orders would be placed for them, they could be talking about a follow-up visit and what time would be best for that patient and a visit would get scheduled for them."

Another pie-in-the-sky wish, she said, would be "the ability for a provider to just quickly get the clinical history of a patient. If they're seeing someone they haven't seen before, just having some way to pull together that clinical history: the pertinent thing a clinician would like to have right in front of them. EHRs have a ton of data, and surfing through that data to try to get to the story of the patient."

Rethinking the EHR for a networked era

Rucker, for his part, said more can be done to capitalize on network effects to improve the lives of providers and patients alike.

"Our world has been transformed by networks," he said. "Metcalfe's law is the law of future generations in healthcare, getting that seamless integration. I'm in a lucky position to be working on APIs at ONC, moving that along and making it truly seamless, across sites of service, across vendors. It should not just be big expensive delivery systems sharing information with themselves. There should be something that is truly pro-consumer, pro-competitive. So moving that along is atop my wish list, and I'm pleased as punch to say I think we are making measurable and rapid progress."

As for EHRs, which are great for automating billing but not so much for developing patient and clinician workflow, Winokur asked whether they should be "completely reimagined, reenvisioned, somehow, some way, from a completely different paradigm."

EHRs have indeed evolved over the past 30 years as a "tool for billing and documentation," said Rucker. "There's been piecework automation, computerized provider order entry being the most notable. But, frankly, if our automation is what it is – that we slap ourselves on the back that we can get lab results back, or maybe an image – y'know, to be able to retrieve a fact from a database is sort of a yawner in the rest of the economy. That's sort of a given, rather than the blessed event it seems to be in healthcare."

He said we need starting think instead about EHRs – "and again, maybe this means new vendors, new APIs, new modes of thinking about it" – as something more akin to enterprise resource planning systems.

"Things need to be instrumented, automated – and there is tons to automate," said Rucker. "A lot of our lack of automation now is handled by the telephone. When I was at Ohio State, we had 130,000 phone calls a day. Of those calls, half were one minute or left, with a median duration of 27 seconds. So, 65,000 calls a day where one fact was exchanged in a 27-second call. Much of this activity was centered on the nursing units."

In other words, "there is a vast opportunity," he said. "If you're exchanging one byte of information, as it were, that can almost certainly be a rich and ripe target for automation, with all the safety, cost and consumer value that brings. So I think one of the next-generation activities is going to be to think of EHRs as ERP systems, and we are doing our darndest (at ONC) to take the incentive to use them as documentation and billing adjuncts out of the equation."
 

Twitter: @MikeMiliardHITN
Email the writer: mike.miliard@himssmedia.com

Healthcare IT News is a publication of HIMSS Media.

]]>
FDA clears GE Healthcare's AI platform for X-ray scans http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/fda-clears-ge-healthcares-ai-platform-x-ray-scans http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/fda-clears-ge-healthcares-ai-platform-x-ray-scans Fri, 13 Sep 2019 11:09:42 CDT mmiliard at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has given clearance to suite of of artificial intelligence algorithms embedded on a mobile X-ray device from GE Healthcare. WHY IT MATTERS The platform, Critical Care Suite, developed in partnership with UC San Francisco and powered by GE's Edison AI technology, can help radiologists prioritize cases involving collapsed lungs. When a patient is scanned on a device with Critical Care Suite, the platform provides triage notifications that are then sent to PACS systems upon transfer of the original diagnostic image. The suite also enables PACS worklist prioritization, and offers an on-device notification to the technologist – the aim is to drastically cut the average review time, which currently takes up to eight hours. GE Healthcare claims the platform can detect nearly all large pneumothoraxes (96 percent sensitivity), with 75 percent for small pneumothoraxes while sharply limiting false alerts. In addition, the Edison platform's embedded data processing analytics provide for automated AI quality check features, which can detect acquisition errors. That means images will be flagged for technologist review, allowing them to make corrections, such as rejections or reprocessing—or even auto rotate the images on-device, before they go to radiologists for review. THE LARGER TREND Given the high number or STAT priority portable chest radiographs ordered, prioritizing acquisition and interpretation of true STATs has become challenging for technologists and radiologists. In many cases these this has leads to process inefficiencies, long turnaround times communication failures, and patient-safety errors, as evidenced by a radiology case study published last year. GE's announcement comes as AI technology continues to advance into advanced medical technology, with tech giants like IBM and its Watson platform developing predictive algorithms, while Nuance is using AI to help surgeons with documentation. Last month, Progknowse announced it is working with LifeBridge Health, Riverside Health and St. Luke's University Health Network to develop new machine learning algorithms for personalized care. However, AI's future in healthcare is not entirely rosy, and numerous challenges, including data security and interoperability issues, could hinder AI growth in healthcare unless the industry improves, according to an August report published in Nature partner journal Digital Medicine. ON THE RECORD "When a patient X-ray is taken, the minutes and hours it takes to process and interpret the image can impact the outcome in either direction," said UCSF surgeon Dr. Rachael Callcut in a statement. "AI gives us an opportunity to speed up diagnosis, and change the way we care for patients, which could ultimately save lives and improve outcomes." “Currently, 62 percent of exams are marked ‘STAT’ or for urgent reading, but they aren’t all critical," explained Jie Xue, President & CEO, X-ray, GE Healthcare. "Not only does Critical Care Suite flag images with a suspected pneumothorax with impressive accuracy and enable radiologists to prioritize those cases immediately, but it also makes AI accessible. Our embedded AI algorithms offer hospitals an opportunity to try AI without making investments into additional IT infrastructure, security assessments or cybersecurity precautions for routing images offsite." Nathan Eddy is a healthcare and technology freelancer based in Berlin. Email the writer: nathaneddy@gmail.com Twitter: @dropdeaded209 Healthcare IT News is a publication of HIMSS Media.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has given clearance to suite of of artificial intelligence algorithms embedded on a mobile X-ray device from GE Healthcare.

WHY IT MATTERS
The platform, Critical Care Suite, developed in partnership with UC San Francisco and powered by GE's Edison AI technology, can help radiologists prioritize cases involving collapsed lungs.

When a patient is scanned on a device with Critical Care Suite, the platform provides triage notifications that are then sent to PACS systems upon transfer of the original diagnostic image.

The suite also enables PACS worklist prioritization, and offers an on-device notification to the technologist – the aim is to drastically cut the average review time, which currently takes up to eight hours.

GE Healthcare claims the platform can detect nearly all large pneumothoraxes (96 percent sensitivity), with 75 percent for small pneumothoraxes while sharply limiting false alerts.

In addition, the Edison platform's embedded data processing analytics provide for automated AI quality check features, which can detect acquisition errors.

That means images will be flagged for technologist review, allowing them to make corrections, such as rejections or reprocessing—or even auto rotate the images on-device, before they go to radiologists for review.

THE LARGER TREND
Given the high number or STAT priority portable chest radiographs ordered, prioritizing acquisition and interpretation of true STATs has become challenging for technologists and radiologists.

In many cases these this has leads to process inefficiencies, long turnaround times communication failures, and patient-safety errors, as evidenced by a radiology case study published last year.

GE's announcement comes as AI technology continues to advance into advanced medical technology, with tech giants like IBM and its Watson platform developing predictive algorithms, while Nuance is using AI to help surgeons with documentation.

Last month, Progknowse announced it is working with LifeBridge Health, Riverside Health and St. Luke's University Health Network to develop new machine learning algorithms for personalized care.

However, AI's future in healthcare is not entirely rosy, and numerous challenges, including data security and interoperability issues, could hinder AI growth in healthcare unless the industry improves, according to an August report published in Nature partner journal Digital Medicine.

ON THE RECORD
"When a patient X-ray is taken, the minutes and hours it takes to process and interpret the image can impact the outcome in either direction," said UCSF surgeon Dr. Rachael Callcut in a statement. "AI gives us an opportunity to speed up diagnosis, and change the way we care for patients, which could ultimately save lives and improve outcomes."

“Currently, 62 percent of exams are marked ‘STAT’ or for urgent reading, but they aren’t all critical," explained Jie Xue, President & CEO, X-ray, GE Healthcare. "Not only does Critical Care Suite flag images with a suspected pneumothorax with impressive accuracy and enable radiologists to prioritize those cases immediately, but it also makes AI accessible. Our embedded AI algorithms offer hospitals an opportunity to try AI without making investments into additional IT infrastructure, security assessments or cybersecurity precautions for routing images offsite."

Nathan Eddy is a healthcare and technology freelancer based in Berlin.
Email the writer: nathaneddy@gmail.com
Twitter: @dropdeaded209

Healthcare IT News is a publication of HIMSS Media.
]]>
Consumer Technology Association publishes new health data privacy guidelines http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/consumer-technology-association-publishes-new-health-data-privacy-guidelines http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/consumer-technology-association-publishes-new-health-data-privacy-guidelines Thu, 12 Sep 2019 14:39:58 CDT mmiliard at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy Companies that handle consumer health and wellness data have a new set of industry-developed privacy guidelines with which to consult. WHY IT MATTERS The voluntary guidelines, drafted by members of the Consumer Technology Association, are meant as a baseline framework to help promote consumer trust in tech companies that handle personal health and wellness data. The recommendations, which allow for flexibility on how companies can implement them, suggest that vendors be as open and transparent as possible about the personal health information they collect and why, and think carefully about how they put that data to use. The guidelines also suggest that companies make it easier for consumers to access and control the sharing of their health information, and give them convenient means to do so. They should also build robust security protections into their technology, says CTA, and be accountable for their promises and practices. The CTA Privacy Principles, developed with input from companies such as Doctor on Demand, Embleema, Humetrix, IBM and Validic, are based around privacy concepts currently present and developing in U.S. law, according to CTA. They're meant to supplement the applicable legal requirements and regimes with which companies need to comply, say association officials, not to supplant them. "CTA’s Privacy Principles give health care companies the guidelines for protecting consumer data and maintaining consumer trust," said Drew Schiller, CEO of Validic and vice chairman of CTA's Health and Fitness Technology Division, in a statement. "This is vitally important not only as an individual company but as an industry." THE LARGER TREND First developed in 2015, an initial set of principles was developed by CTA in response to tangible privacy risks and to learn more about consumer preferences for their health data. These new guidelines have been expanded, according to the industry group. Beyond data generated from wearables, the new list of voluntary guidelines cover the collection, use and sharing of any data from personal health and wellness devices, apps, websites and more. But the fact that the rules are voluntary, and meant to complement existing privacy regulations, is an important one. The area of personal health data is one that's fast evolving, especially given the imperative — driven by recent proposed rules from CMS and ONC — for greater consumer empowerment and wider sharing of device data.  Suffice it to say, more state and federal regs for consumer health companies will be forthcoming. We spoke recently with Deven McGraw, general counsel and chief regulatory officer for consumer health tech startup Ciitizen and former chief privacy officer at ONC, and Vince Kuraitis, whose consultancy, Better Health Technologies, has been especially focused recently on emerging data-driven business models, about some of the challenges of the existing health data privacy landscape. "The yin-yang approach to privacy and data use has been around for as long as we've had privacy law," said McGraw. "But it has become more salient now." She added: "You can't resolve this without some sort of legislative activity." But Kuraitis said that's a prospect that many companies may be starting to welcome. "What's changed here is that you now see even the large tech companies saying, 'Give us regulations,'" said Kuraitis. "They have fears of a lack of harmonization of guidelines and regulations, at an international level with what's going on in Europe, and they're also fearful of 50 states adopting for 50 different sets of privacy laws." In the meantime, the mere fact that companies such as CTA's members are thinking so in-depth about the implications of their data policies is a clear sign that they recognize consumers are more savvy and empowered about how their data is put to work than they once were. ON THE RECORD "These privacy guidelines, developed with consensus among industry stakeholders, will help give both individuals and companies the confidence to invest in innovative technologies which will improve health," said Gary Shapiro, president and CEO of CTA, in a statement. "The CTA Privacy Principles demonstrate that health tech companies understand they must be trusted stewards of patient data." Twitter: @MikeMiliardHITN Email the writer: mike.miliard@himssmedia.com Healthcare IT News is a publication of HIMSS Media.

Companies that handle consumer health and wellness data have a new set of industry-developed privacy guidelines with which to consult.

WHY IT MATTERS
The voluntary guidelines, drafted by members of the Consumer Technology Association, are meant as a baseline framework to help promote consumer trust in tech companies that handle personal health and wellness data.

The recommendations, which allow for flexibility on how companies can implement them, suggest that vendors be as open and transparent as possible about the personal health information they collect and why, and think carefully about how they put that data to use.

The guidelines also suggest that companies make it easier for consumers to access and control the sharing of their health information, and give them convenient means to do so. They should also build robust security protections into their technology, says CTA, and be accountable for their promises and practices.

The CTA Privacy Principles, developed with input from companies such as Doctor on Demand, Embleema, Humetrix, IBM and Validic, are based around privacy concepts currently present and developing in U.S. law, according to CTA.

They're meant to supplement the applicable legal requirements and regimes with which companies need to comply, say association officials, not to supplant them.

"CTA’s Privacy Principles give health care companies the guidelines for protecting consumer data and maintaining consumer trust," said Drew Schiller, CEO of Validic and vice chairman of CTA's Health and Fitness Technology Division, in a statement. "This is vitally important not only as an individual company but as an industry."

THE LARGER TREND
First developed in 2015, an initial set of principles was developed by CTA in response to tangible privacy risks and to learn more about consumer preferences for their health data.

These new guidelines have been expanded, according to the industry group. Beyond data generated from wearables, the new list of voluntary guidelines cover the collection, use and sharing of any data from personal health and wellness devices, apps, websites and more.

But the fact that the rules are voluntary, and meant to complement existing privacy regulations, is an important one. The area of personal health data is one that's fast evolving, especially given the imperative — driven by recent proposed rules from CMS and ONC — for greater consumer empowerment and wider sharing of device data. 

Suffice it to say, more state and federal regs for consumer health companies will be forthcoming.

We spoke recently with Deven McGraw, general counsel and chief regulatory officer for consumer health tech startup Ciitizen and former chief privacy officer at ONC, and Vince Kuraitis, whose consultancy, Better Health Technologies, has been especially focused recently on emerging data-driven business models, about some of the challenges of the existing health data privacy landscape.

"The yin-yang approach to privacy and data use has been around for as long as we've had privacy law," said McGraw. "But it has become more salient now."

She added: "You can't resolve this without some sort of legislative activity."

But Kuraitis said that's a prospect that many companies may be starting to welcome.

"What's changed here is that you now see even the large tech companies saying, 'Give us regulations,'" said Kuraitis. "They have fears of a lack of harmonization of guidelines and regulations, at an international level with what's going on in Europe, and they're also fearful of 50 states adopting for 50 different sets of privacy laws."

In the meantime, the mere fact that companies such as CTA's members are thinking so in-depth about the implications of their data policies is a clear sign that they recognize consumers are more savvy and empowered about how their data is put to work than they once were.

ON THE RECORD
"These privacy guidelines, developed with consensus among industry stakeholders, will help give both individuals and companies the confidence to invest in innovative technologies which will improve health," said Gary Shapiro, president and CEO of CTA, in a statement. "The CTA Privacy Principles demonstrate that health tech companies understand they must be trusted stewards of patient data."

Twitter: @MikeMiliardHITN
Email the writer: mike.miliard@himssmedia.com

Healthcare IT News is a publication of HIMSS Media.

]]>
HHS announces interoperability innovation awardees for FHIR scalability, patient engagement http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/hhs-announces-interoperability-innovation-awardees-fhir-scalability-patient-engagement http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/hhs-announces-interoperability-innovation-awardees-fhir-scalability-patient-engagement Tue, 10 Sep 2019 13:39:07 CDT mmiliard at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy Two interoperability projects will get a funding boost from the Leading Edge Acceleration Projects in Health Information Technology, or LEAP in Health IT program, launched by the The Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information IT. WHY IT MATTERS The LEAP in Health IT awardees will get address fast emerging and future challenges to advance the development and use of interoperable health IT. The specific focus is twofold. ONC was seeking innovations in the standardization and implementation of scalable FHIR consent resources, and the design, development and demonstration of enhanced patient engagement technologies. The 2019 awardees are San Diego Regional Health Information Exchange and University of Texas at Austin. San Diego Regional HIE, with an eye toward standards, use case and community testing, will develop and make available FHIR Consent Implementation Guide and package new open-source prototypes and content to assist partners in using the FHIR Consent Resource. University of Texas at Austin will develop and test a patient-engagement platform to support an array of mobile apps aimed at underrepresented populations. The focus will be on privacy and security needs, user-centered design approaches and appropriate data sharing across patients, clinicians and researchers. THE LARGER TREND ONC says the LEAP in Health IT initiative is aimed at "well-documented and fast emerging challenges that inhibit the development, use, and/or advancement of well-designed, interoperable health IT. It is expected to further a new generation of health IT development and inform the innovative implementation and refinement of standards, methods, and techniques for overcoming major barriers and challenges as they are identified." These initiatives are the most recent in ONC's ongoing efforts to spur interoperability innovation across healthcare. While another project, CONNECT, recently transitioned from ONC control to the private sector, other efforts continue as the agency pushes forward on data exchange imperatives of the 21st Century Cures Act. ON THE RECORD "These projects will make it easier for our increasingly complex health care system to leverage the latest technological advancements and breakthroughs more quickly and to enable real-time solutions to health care challenges," said National Coordinator for Health IT Dr. Don Rucker, in a statement.   Twitter: @MikeMiliardHITN Email the writer: mike.miliard@himssmedia.com Healthcare IT News is a publication of HIMSS Media.

Two interoperability projects will get a funding boost from the Leading Edge Acceleration Projects in Health Information Technology, or LEAP in Health IT program, launched by the The Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information IT.

WHY IT MATTERS
The LEAP in Health IT awardees will get address fast emerging and future challenges to advance the development and use of interoperable health IT.

The specific focus is twofold. ONC was seeking innovations in the standardization and implementation of scalable FHIR consent resources, and the design, development and demonstration of enhanced patient engagement technologies.

The 2019 awardees are San Diego Regional Health Information Exchange and University of Texas at Austin.

San Diego Regional HIE, with an eye toward standards, use case and community testing, will develop and make available FHIR Consent Implementation Guide and package new open-source prototypes and content to assist partners in using the FHIR Consent Resource.

University of Texas at Austin will develop and test a patient-engagement platform to support an array of mobile apps aimed at underrepresented populations. The focus will be on privacy and security needs, user-centered design approaches and appropriate data sharing across patients, clinicians and researchers.

THE LARGER TREND
ONC says the LEAP in Health IT initiative is aimed at "well-documented and fast emerging challenges that inhibit the development, use, and/or advancement of well-designed, interoperable health IT. It is expected to further a new generation of health IT development and inform the innovative implementation and refinement of standards, methods, and techniques for overcoming major barriers and challenges as they are identified."

These initiatives are the most recent in ONC's ongoing efforts to spur interoperability innovation across healthcare. While another project, CONNECT, recently transitioned from ONC control to the private sector, other efforts continue as the agency pushes forward on data exchange imperatives of the 21st Century Cures Act.

ON THE RECORD
"These projects will make it easier for our increasingly complex health care system to leverage the latest technological advancements and breakthroughs more quickly and to enable real-time solutions to health care challenges," said National Coordinator for Health IT Dr. Don Rucker, in a statement.
 

Twitter: @MikeMiliardHITN
Email the writer: mike.miliard@himssmedia.com

Healthcare IT News is a publication of HIMSS Media.

]]>
UK pledges £130m for new tech to tackle debilitating diseases http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/europe/uk-pledges-130m-new-tech-tackle-debilitating-diseases http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/europe/uk-pledges-130m-new-tech-tackle-debilitating-diseases Tue, 10 Sep 2019 11:49:58 CDT dyogendra at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy People in the UK could benefit from faster diagnosis and better treatment for debilitating illnesses after the government revealed this week that it would invest over £130m in research for healthcare innovation. This includes a £50m funding boost to support NHS diagnostic services and the work of the Centres of Excellence in digital pathology and imaging with AI, set up by UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) last year. WHAT HAPPENED Based in London, Leeds, Oxford and Coventry, these centres bring together representatives from the NHS, the industry and academia to create new products that enable early diagnosis of disease by leveraging advances in digital technology. According to the government, the £50m will be allocated through a competition managed by UKRI between the four centres, helping to expand their work by partnering with more NHS trusts.  Adult social care will also receive a £7.5m boost for research to improve care delivery, while £14m will be used to fund bioscience projects and technologies that could, for instance, provide help in the treatment of osteoarthritis and developing vaccines.   With the new funding, the aim is to also help people lead healthier and longer lives, as the Office for National Statistics estimates that over 24% of people in the UK will be aged 65 or over by 2042, compared to 18% three years ago. “Supporting people to live long, healthy and independent lives is a fundamental value of our society and, as our population ages, one of the biggest challenges we face,” said Professor Sir Mark Walport, UKRI chief executive. “This £133 million investment will tackle important chronic diseases and also create a national centre of evidence for implementing the best evidence to provide adult social care.” THE LARGER TREND In August, the government revealed that NHSX and the Accelerated Access Collaborative, the umbrella organisation for UK health innovation, would create a national AI lab for the NHS, supported by a £250m fund. “In the first instance it [the £250m investment] should help personalise NHS screening and treatments for cancer, eye disease and a range of other conditions, as well as freeing up staff time,” said at the time Simon Stevens, NHS England chief executive. ON THE RECORD In a statement, Matt Hancock, health and social care secretary, said: “We’ve got to bring NHS technology into the 21st century. I’ve seen for myself how better technology and diagnosis can save clinicians’ time so they can concentrate on care. “The NHS is now spearheading world-leading technologies that can transform and save lives through new treatments, diagnosis techniques and care. I’m determined that the benefits of these advances will improve the lives of thousands of patients whose conditions have long been considered life-limiting.”

People in the UK could benefit from faster diagnosis and better treatment for debilitating illnesses after the government revealed this week that it would invest over £130m in research for healthcare innovation.

This includes a £50m funding boost to support NHS diagnostic services and the work of the Centres of Excellence in digital pathology and imaging with AI, set up by UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) last year.

WHAT HAPPENED

Based in London, Leeds, Oxford and Coventry, these centres bring together representatives from the NHS, the industry and academia to create new products that enable early diagnosis of disease by leveraging advances in digital technology.

According to the government, the £50m will be allocated through a competition managed by UKRI between the four centres, helping to expand their work by partnering with more NHS trusts. 

Adult social care will also receive a £7.5m boost for research to improve care delivery, while £14m will be used to fund bioscience projects and technologies that could, for instance, provide help in the treatment of osteoarthritis and developing vaccines.  

With the new funding, the aim is to also help people lead healthier and longer lives, as the Office for National Statistics estimates that over 24% of people in the UK will be aged 65 or over by 2042, compared to 18% three years ago.

“Supporting people to live long, healthy and independent lives is a fundamental value of our society and, as our population ages, one of the biggest challenges we face,” said Professor Sir Mark Walport, UKRI chief executive. “This £133 million investment will tackle important chronic diseases and also create a national centre of evidence for implementing the best evidence to provide adult social care.”

THE LARGER TREND

In August, the government revealed that NHSX and the Accelerated Access Collaborative, the umbrella organisation for UK health innovation, would create a national AI lab for the NHS, supported by a £250m fund.

“In the first instance it [the £250m investment] should help personalise NHS screening and treatments for cancer, eye disease and a range of other conditions, as well as freeing up staff time,” said at the time Simon Stevens, NHS England chief executive.

ON THE RECORD

In a statement, Matt Hancock, health and social care secretary, said: “We’ve got to bring NHS technology into the 21st century. I’ve seen for myself how better technology and diagnosis can save clinicians’ time so they can concentrate on care.

“The NHS is now spearheading world-leading technologies that can transform and save lives through new treatments, diagnosis techniques and care. I’m determined that the benefits of these advances will improve the lives of thousands of patients whose conditions have long been considered life-limiting.”

]]>
In a first, HIPAA right of access case gets settled with OCR http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/first-hipaa-right-access-case-gets-settled-ocr http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/first-hipaa-right-access-case-gets-settled-ocr Tue, 10 Sep 2019 11:07:53 CDT mmiliard at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy The first enforcement action and settlement related to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Right of Access Initiative is costing one Florida hospital $85,000. WHY IT MATTERS HHS Office for Civil Rights reached the monetary settlement with Bayfront Health St. Petersburg, which has also agreed to a corrective action plan, for noncompliance with HIPAA's new right of access provision. OCR alleges that Bayfront, a 480-bed Level II trauma and tertiary care center, failed to give a mother timely access to records about her unborn child. After the mother lodged a complaint with OCR, Bayfront eventually supplied the requested health information – more than nine months after her first request. HIPAA generally requires that covered entities provide access medical records within 30 days of a patient's request, and only allows providers to charge a reasonable cost-based fee. That right extends to parents seeking medical information about minor children – including, as in this case, mothers who seek prenatal health records. In addition to the monetary settlement, Bayfront will undertake a corrective action plan that includes one year of monitoring by OCR. THE LARGER TREND Upon announcing its Right of Access Initiative, HHS promised to "vigorously enforce" the rights of patients to get timely copies of their medical records without being overcharged. "With the increasing use of and continued advances in health information technology, individuals have ever expanding and innovative opportunities to access their health information electronically, more quickly and easily, in real time and on demand," said HHS officials earlier this year. "Individuals with access to their health information are better able to monitor chronic conditions, adhere to treatment plans, find and fix errors in their health records, track progress in wellness or disease management programs, and directly contribute their information to research." ON THE RECORD "Providing patients with their health information not only lowers costs and leads to better health outcomes, it's the law," said OCR Director Roger Severino, in a statement about the Bayfront settlement. "We aim to hold the healthcare industry accountable for ignoring peoples' rights to access their medical records and those of their kids."   Twitter: @MikeMiliardHITN Email the writer: mike.miliard@himssmedia.com Healthcare IT News is a publication of HIMSS Media.

The first enforcement action and settlement related to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Right of Access Initiative is costing one Florida hospital $85,000.

WHY IT MATTERS
HHS Office for Civil Rights reached the monetary settlement with Bayfront Health St. Petersburg, which has also agreed to a corrective action plan, for noncompliance with HIPAA's new right of access provision.

OCR alleges that Bayfront, a 480-bed Level II trauma and tertiary care center, failed to give a mother timely access to records about her unborn child.

After the mother lodged a complaint with OCR, Bayfront eventually supplied the requested health information – more than nine months after her first request.

HIPAA generally requires that covered entities provide access medical records within 30 days of a patient's request, and only allows providers to charge a reasonable cost-based fee.

That right extends to parents seeking medical information about minor children – including, as in this case, mothers who seek prenatal health records.

In addition to the monetary settlement, Bayfront will undertake a corrective action plan that includes one year of monitoring by OCR.

THE LARGER TREND
Upon announcing its Right of Access Initiative, HHS promised to "vigorously enforce" the rights of patients to get timely copies of their medical records without being overcharged.

"With the increasing use of and continued advances in health information technology, individuals have ever expanding and innovative opportunities to access their health information electronically, more quickly and easily, in real time and on demand," said HHS officials earlier this year.

"Individuals with access to their health information are better able to monitor chronic conditions, adhere to treatment plans, find and fix errors in their health records, track progress in wellness or disease management programs, and directly contribute their information to research."

ON THE RECORD
"Providing patients with their health information not only lowers costs and leads to better health outcomes, it's the law," said OCR Director Roger Severino, in a statement about the Bayfront settlement. "We aim to hold the healthcare industry accountable for ignoring peoples' rights to access their medical records and those of their kids."
 

Twitter: @MikeMiliardHITN
Email the writer: mike.miliard@himssmedia.com

Healthcare IT News is a publication of HIMSS Media.

]]>
FHA, ONC transition CONNECT interoperability project to the private sector http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/fha-onc-transition-connect-interoperability-project-private-sector http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/fha-onc-transition-connect-interoperability-project-private-sector Mon, 09 Sep 2019 11:30:55 CDT mmiliard at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy The Federal Health Architecture and the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT ended federal support for the decade-old CONNECT data exchange project on September 6. WHY IT MATTERS CONNECT is an open source software and community project, jointly developed 10 years ago by FHA and ONC as another way to harness the expertise of software developers and promote interoperability across the U.S. healthcare system. While FHA and ONC will no longer maintain or update the CONNECT wiki, officials said, it will continue to exist as an open source project whose code and community resources can be "used, adopted and implemented by any interested organization," according to the wiki. Developers can contribute bug fixes and new features back into the source code, and to the greater community, where health organizations can use its software to help establish health information exchanges and otherwise share data using its interoperability standards. The caveat, however, is that with the government no longer involved, the health agencies cannot "endorse or verify the quality" those resources previously managed under FHA’s guidance. THE LARGER TREND In a blog post on the ONC website, Avinash Shanbhag, director of the Nationwide Health Information Network Division at HHS, and Sherilyn Pruitt, director of the Office of Programs and Engagement at ONC, explained the move, They wrote: "This past decade, we have witnessed steady improvements to healthcare interoperability. For those paying close attention, the CONNECT open source project has played a role in making those improvements possible. Now the time has come for the community at large to determine the future of CONNECT." A decade ago, FHA and ONC "opted to build a joint health interoperability solution, instead of each agency developing a custom solution to connect, and they had the forethought to make the project open source," they explained. "This decision ensured CONNECT software was available to any organization, including non-governmental organizations, that needed a technical means to connect to the network, which ultimately became the eHealth Exchange." Over the past 10 years, CONNECT has enabled many advances, they point out. "It electronically connected federal agencies and private sector organizations to the eHealth Exchange. It provided code reused by private developers as part of their own electronic health record and interoperability solutions. And notably, it helped test early interoperability specifications, which allowed standards development organizations to better provide feedback and promote standards." Now, after a decade of FHA stewardship – it led the project in coordination with its managing partners, HHS, DoD, VA and the Social Security Administration – federal CONNECT development has ended and the project is now in the hands of the private sector. The final version of the software, CONNECT 5.3, was released this past July. ON THE RECORD Portions of CONNECT's open source code "can today be found in private sector offerings across the industry," Shanbhag and Pruitt note. "We have watched the ongoing development of CONNECT and appreciate the hard work by our federal partners to ensure its success," they said. "By implementing and testing emerging healthcare interoperability standards, the federal agencies that support the development of CONNECT performed a real service to our country." Twitter: @MikeMiliardHITN Email the writer: mike.miliard@himssmedia.com Healthcare IT News is a publication of HIMSS Media.

The Federal Health Architecture and the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT ended federal support for the decade-old CONNECT data exchange project on September 6.

WHY IT MATTERS
CONNECT is an open source software and community project, jointly developed 10 years ago by FHA and ONC as another way to harness the expertise of software developers and promote interoperability across the U.S. healthcare system.

While FHA and ONC will no longer maintain or update the CONNECT wiki, officials said, it will continue to exist as an open source project whose code and community resources can be "used, adopted and implemented by any interested organization," according to the wiki.

Developers can contribute bug fixes and new features back into the source code, and to the greater community, where health organizations can use its software to help establish health information exchanges and otherwise share data using its interoperability standards.

The caveat, however, is that with the government no longer involved, the health agencies cannot "endorse or verify the quality" those resources previously managed under FHA’s guidance.

THE LARGER TREND
In a blog post on the ONC website, Avinash Shanbhag, director of the Nationwide Health Information Network Division at HHS, and Sherilyn Pruitt, director of the Office of Programs and Engagement at ONC, explained the move,

They wrote: "This past decade, we have witnessed steady improvements to healthcare interoperability. For those paying close attention, the CONNECT open source project has played a role in making those improvements possible. Now the time has come for the community at large to determine the future of CONNECT."

A decade ago, FHA and ONC "opted to build a joint health interoperability solution, instead of each agency developing a custom solution to connect, and they had the forethought to make the project open source," they explained.

"This decision ensured CONNECT software was available to any organization, including non-governmental organizations, that needed a technical means to connect to the network, which ultimately became the eHealth Exchange."

Over the past 10 years, CONNECT has enabled many advances, they point out. "It electronically connected federal agencies and private sector organizations to the eHealth Exchange. It provided code reused by private developers as part of their own electronic health record and interoperability solutions. And notably, it helped test early interoperability specifications, which allowed standards development organizations to better provide feedback and promote standards."

Now, after a decade of FHA stewardship – it led the project in coordination with its managing partners, HHS, DoD, VA and the Social Security Administration – federal CONNECT development has ended and the project is now in the hands of the private sector.

The final version of the software, CONNECT 5.3, was released this past July.

ON THE RECORD
Portions of CONNECT's open source code "can today be found in private sector offerings across the industry," Shanbhag and Pruitt note.

"We have watched the ongoing development of CONNECT and appreciate the hard work by our federal partners to ensure its success," they said. "By implementing and testing emerging healthcare interoperability standards, the federal agencies that support the development of CONNECT performed a real service to our country."

Twitter: @MikeMiliardHITN
Email the writer: mike.miliard@himssmedia.com

Healthcare IT News is a publication of HIMSS Media.

]]>
Liberating healthcare data is the goal in US and abroad http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/video/liberating-healthcare-data-goal-us-and-abroad http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/video/liberating-healthcare-data-goal-us-and-abroad Fri, 06 Sep 2019 07:48:16 CDT rickdagley at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy Primary topic: Government & PolicyDisable Auto Tagging: Short Headline: Liberating healthcare data is the goal in US and abroadFeatured Decision Content: Region Tag: Global Edition
Primary topic: 
Disable Auto Tagging: 
Short Headline: 
Liberating healthcare data is the goal in US and abroad
Featured Decision Content: 
Region Tag: 
Global Edition
]]>
ONC names Sequoia Project as TEFCA coordinator http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/onc-names-sequoia-project-tefca-coordinator http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/onc-names-sequoia-project-tefca-coordinator Wed, 04 Sep 2019 13:46:20 CDT mmiliard at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy The Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT has awarded a new cooperative agreement to the Sequoia Project to run a major component of the Trusted Exchange Framework and Common Agreement, or TEFCA. WHY IT MATTERS As the recognized coordinating entity for TEFCA, Sequoia Project is charged with developing, updating, implementing and maintaining the common agreement portion of the framework, according to ONC. In addition, Sequoia will work with ONC to designate and monitor Qualified Health Information Networks and modify and update accompanying QHIN technical requirements, the agency says. It will also work with stakeholders to adjudicate noncompliance with the common agreement and proposing sustainability strategies to support TEFCA beyond the agreement’s period of performance. THE LARGER TREND The nonprofit Sequoia Project – which restructured in 2018 as a convener with two independent subsidiary initiatives, eHealth Exchange and Carequality – is a public-private collaborative aimed at solving real-world interoperability challenges by bringing together stakeholders from government and the private sector to address the opportunities and challenges inherent in health data exchange. TEFCA is a key component of ONC’s implementation of the 21st Century Cures Act. The common agreement will comprise baseline technical and legal requirements for health information networks to share electronic health information. The Cures Act prioritizes trusted exchange as a means of creating an environment of transparency and competition across healthcare, addressing the technical barriers and business practices that otherwise can impede the secure and appropriate sharing of electronic health information. In June, many industry groups offered comments to ONC on Draft 2 of the Trusted Exchange Framework and Common Agreement. Among them was the Sequoia Project, which offered a list of technical suggestions for how TEFCA Draft 2 can be improved. For other suggestions, it said the framework should seek to avoid disruption and duplication of existing exchanges between health information networks. As currently drafted, Sequoia noted, TEFCA "would both disrupt and duplicate existing exchange mechanisms and would require extensive changes to existing activities and revisions to the terms of thousands of legal agreements." The group also emphasized that TEFCA should ultimately "address real, material gaps in current exchange networks, frameworks and agreements," noting that a specific area where it could to a lot of good is with the "harmonization of agreed upon purposes for exchange and use of information." ON THE RECORD "We have learned through our own operations that seamless nationwide sharing of health information is most readily enabled through trust agreements, consistent policy and technical requirements, and appropriate, balanced governance to provide assurance of trust and interoperability," said Mariann Yeager, CEO of The Sequoia Project. "The Sequoia Project was selected through a competitive process to help with the interoperable flow of health information," added National Coordinator for Health IT Dr. Don Rucker. "We look forward to working in close collaboration with The Sequoia Project and across the broader health system to create a Common Agreement that best serves the needs of all stakeholders." Twitter: @MikeMiliardHITN Email the writer: mike.miliard@himssmedia.com Healthcare IT News is a publication of HIMSS Media.

The Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT has awarded a new cooperative agreement to the Sequoia Project to run a major component of the Trusted Exchange Framework and Common Agreement, or TEFCA.

WHY IT MATTERS
As the recognized coordinating entity for TEFCA, Sequoia Project is charged with developing, updating, implementing and maintaining the common agreement portion of the framework, according to ONC.

In addition, Sequoia will work with ONC to designate and monitor Qualified Health Information Networks and modify and update accompanying QHIN technical requirements, the agency says. It will also work with stakeholders to adjudicate noncompliance with the common agreement and proposing sustainability strategies to support TEFCA beyond the agreement’s period of performance.

THE LARGER TREND
The nonprofit Sequoia Project – which restructured in 2018 as a convener with two independent subsidiary initiatives, eHealth Exchange and Carequality – is a public-private collaborative aimed at solving real-world interoperability challenges by bringing together stakeholders from government and the private sector to address the opportunities and challenges inherent in health data exchange.

TEFCA is a key component of ONC’s implementation of the 21st Century Cures Act. The common agreement will comprise baseline technical and legal requirements for health information networks to share electronic health information.

The Cures Act prioritizes trusted exchange as a means of creating an environment of transparency and competition across healthcare, addressing the technical barriers and business practices that otherwise can impede the secure and appropriate sharing of electronic health information.

In June, many industry groups offered comments to ONC on Draft 2 of the Trusted Exchange Framework and Common Agreement. Among them was the Sequoia Project, which offered a list of technical suggestions for how TEFCA Draft 2 can be improved.

For other suggestions, it said the framework should seek to avoid disruption and duplication of existing exchanges between health information networks. As currently drafted, Sequoia noted, TEFCA "would both disrupt and duplicate existing exchange mechanisms and would require extensive changes to existing activities and revisions to the terms of thousands of legal agreements."

The group also emphasized that TEFCA should ultimately "address real, material gaps in current exchange networks, frameworks and agreements," noting that a specific area where it could to a lot of good is with the "harmonization of agreed upon purposes for exchange and use of information."

ON THE RECORD
"We have learned through our own operations that seamless nationwide sharing of health information is most readily enabled through trust agreements, consistent policy and technical requirements, and appropriate, balanced governance to provide assurance of trust and interoperability," said Mariann Yeager, CEO of The Sequoia Project.

"The Sequoia Project was selected through a competitive process to help with the interoperable flow of health information," added National Coordinator for Health IT Dr. Don Rucker. "We look forward to working in close collaboration with The Sequoia Project and across the broader health system to create a Common Agreement that best serves the needs of all stakeholders."

Twitter: @MikeMiliardHITN
Email the writer: mike.miliard@himssmedia.com

Healthcare IT News is a publication of HIMSS Media.

]]>
Health orgs making strategic interoperability plans beyond CMS and ONC rules http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/health-orgs-making-strategic-interoperability-plans-beyond-cms-and-onc-rules http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/health-orgs-making-strategic-interoperability-plans-beyond-cms-and-onc-rules Wed, 04 Sep 2019 07:54:51 CDT mmiliard at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy Forward thinking healthcare leaders in the United States see the proposed rules to drive interoperability across the healthcare ecosystem as a base level from which to improve operations, according to a new report from health Deloitte. WHY IT MATTERS Deloitte's survey of 70 payers and providers also indicated these health systems believe they will have to go beyond what their IT vendors currently provide in order to achieve the level of interoperability envisioned by the federal regulations. The proposed rules published by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services and Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology are aimed at improving the ability to share electronic medical information among different providers, caregivers and patients. According to the survey findings, 43 percent of health system and 63 percent of health plan leaders said they plan to use the compliance requirements as part of their broader interoperability strategy – even as more than half of respondents say they are building their own application programming interface solutions. Strategies vary from plans to use a hybrid approach of self-built infrastructure with vendor provided services to completely in-house designed APIs. As the analyst firm expects the administration to finalize the rules in fall 2019, with many of the provisions going into effect on January 1, 2020, Deloitte recommended health systems prioritize a set of initiatives and road map to achieve compliance in time. The report also suggests health systems would be wise to simultaneously establish longer-term goals to adopt digital tools, enhance consumer engagement and evaluate overall consent and risk management strategies for use of data. THE LARGER TREND CMS and ONC intend for the proposed rules to make it easier for providers, patients, plans, and other stakeholders to have improved access to the information necessary to coordinate individual care, as well as analyze population health trends, outcomes and costs. Interoperability is seen as the key enabling feature of the sprawling digital transformation impacting the healthcare ecosystem, which will require access to data through open, secure platforms. The Deloitte report warned health care organizations that fail to see beyond compliance deadlines and realize the greater strategic value of interoperability and data could risk falling behind. However, last month’s Center for Connected Medicine/HIMSS Media survey of healthcare tech leaders shows that most hospitals and health systems are still depending on a single, integrated EHR, indicating health data-sharing is still lacking inside and outside of hospitals. ON THE RECORD “Organizations should leverage the regulatory requirements on interoperability as a jumping off point for their broader strategy for sharing data with industry stakeholders and with patients,” the report noted, adding that those that "develop and implement a strategic approach to interoperability are likely to have a competitive advantage with insights, affordability, and consumer engagement in the future of health." Nathan Eddy is a healthcare and technology freelancer based in Berlin. Email the writer: nathaneddy@gmail.com Twitter: @dropdeaded209

Forward thinking healthcare leaders in the United States see the proposed rules to drive interoperability across the healthcare ecosystem as a base level from which to improve operations, according to a new report from health Deloitte.

WHY IT MATTERS
Deloitte's survey of 70 payers and providers also indicated these health systems believe they will have to go beyond what their IT vendors currently provide in order to achieve the level of interoperability envisioned by the federal regulations.

The proposed rules published by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services and Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology are aimed at improving the ability to share electronic medical information among different providers, caregivers and patients.

According to the survey findings, 43 percent of health system and 63 percent of health plan leaders said they plan to use the compliance requirements as part of their broader interoperability strategy – even as more than half of respondents say they are building their own application programming interface solutions.

Strategies vary from plans to use a hybrid approach of self-built infrastructure with vendor provided services to completely in-house designed APIs.

As the analyst firm expects the administration to finalize the rules in fall 2019, with many of the provisions going into effect on January 1, 2020, Deloitte recommended health systems prioritize a set of initiatives and road map to achieve compliance in time.

The report also suggests health systems would be wise to simultaneously establish longer-term goals to adopt digital tools, enhance consumer engagement and evaluate overall consent and risk management strategies for use of data.

THE LARGER TREND
CMS and ONC intend for the proposed rules to make it easier for providers, patients, plans, and other stakeholders to have improved access to the information necessary to coordinate individual care, as well as analyze population health trends, outcomes and costs.

Interoperability is seen as the key enabling feature of the sprawling digital transformation impacting the healthcare ecosystem, which will require access to data through open, secure platforms.

The Deloitte report warned health care organizations that fail to see beyond compliance deadlines and realize the greater strategic value of interoperability and data could risk falling behind.

However, last month’s Center for Connected Medicine/HIMSS Media survey of healthcare tech leaders shows that most hospitals and health systems are still depending on a single, integrated EHR, indicating health data-sharing is still lacking inside and outside of hospitals.

ON THE RECORD
“Organizations should leverage the regulatory requirements on interoperability as a jumping off point for their broader strategy for sharing data with industry stakeholders and with patients,” the report noted, adding that those that "develop and implement a strategic approach to interoperability are likely to have a competitive advantage with insights, affordability, and consumer engagement in the future of health."

Nathan Eddy is a healthcare and technology freelancer based in Berlin.
Email the writer: nathaneddy@gmail.com
Twitter: @dropdeaded209

]]>
Physicians should think twice about promoting medical credit cards to their patients http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/finance-experts-warn-medical-credit-cards?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/finance-experts-warn-medical-credit-cards?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Tue, 20 Feb 2018 10:15:20 CST Joanne Finnegan at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Consumers use credit cards to pay for everything (including the kitchen sink), and the latest trend has people using medical credit cards to pay for healthcare services. But financial experts are warning practices about the pitfalls of promoting so-called medical credit cards to their patients, says the Healthcare Financial Management Association. Trump administration issues proposed rule to expand short-term insurance plans http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/trump-administration-short-term-insurance-rule?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/trump-administration-short-term-insurance-rule?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Tue, 20 Feb 2018 09:56:31 CST Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare A proposed rule issued by three federal agencies on Tuesday would expand limits for short-term health insurance plans from three months to 12 months. CMS's Seema Verma dismissed concerns that the policy shift would destabilize the individual market by siphoning off healthy individuals, arguing the change will have "virtually no impact" on ACA premiums. Under Trump, HHS rolls back policies aimed at protecting LGBT rights http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/trump-hhs-lgbt-rights-alex-azar?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/trump-hhs-lgbt-rights-alex-azar?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Tue, 20 Feb 2018 09:31:52 CST Leslie Small at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Though President Donald Trump promised to support LGBT causes during the 2016 campaign, under his watch the Department of Health and Human Services had rolled back several initiatives aimed at protecting the rights of that population. New HHS Secretary Alex Azar could take the department in a different direction. Study: Community navigators can reduce the high cost of 'superusers' in hospital settings http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/patient-engagement/community-navigators-superusers-hospital-visits-decrease?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/patient-engagement/community-navigators-superusers-hospital-visits-decrease?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Tue, 20 Feb 2018 09:08:46 CST Paige Minemyer at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare "Superusers," those costly patients who utilize high levels of hospital care, are a significant burden on the healthcare system. But a new study suggests that pairing them with community navigators can reduce their use of hospital services. Researchers in Tennessee found that the intervention reduced their healthcare encounters by 39%. Patients lack information about imaging exams, study finds http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/patients-lack-information-imaging-exams-radiology-study-yale?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/patients-lack-information-imaging-exams-radiology-study-yale?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Sat, 17 Feb 2018 20:14:46 CST Joanne Finnegan at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Doctors can do a better job providing patients with information before they go for an imaging exam, a new study found. One in five patients shows up for an imaging exam without any information about the test they are about to undergo, according to the study published in Radiology. Most for-profit hospitals will benefit from U.S. tax overhaul, but 2 big-name providers stand to gain the most http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/most-for-profit-hospitals-will-benefit-from-us-tax-overhaul-but-two-big-name-providers?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/most-for-profit-hospitals-will-benefit-from-us-tax-overhaul-but-two-big-name-providers?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 16 Feb 2018 15:23:18 CST Ilene MacDonald at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Most for-profit hospitals stand to gain from the changes to the U.S. tax laws, according to a new Moody’s Investors Service report. But HCA Healthcare and Universal Health Service will be the biggest beneficiaries and could see their operating cash flows go up by 10% or more. North Carolina attorney general seeks more details on Atrium Health-UNC Health Care merger  http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/atrium-health-university-north-carolina-merger-ag-wants-details?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/atrium-health-university-north-carolina-merger-ag-wants-details?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 16 Feb 2018 15:12:13 CST Paige Minemyer at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare North Carolina's attorney general is asking Atrium Health and UNC Health Care to provide more information on their merger plans. AG Josh Stein said he intends to ensure that the planned merger doesn't increase patient costs. 5 medical conditions that cost more than $15K per hospital stay http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/5-medical-conditions-cost-more-than-15k-per-hospital-stay?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/5-medical-conditions-cost-more-than-15k-per-hospital-stay?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 16 Feb 2018 14:01:34 CST Ilene MacDonald at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Heart valve disorders lead the list of the most expensive medical conditions with the highest average cost per inpatient stay, according to an analysis by Business Insider based on 2016 data from Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project. Heart valve disorders, on average, cost $41,878 per stay, the analysis found. Anthem alters controversial ER coverage policies http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/anthem-er-coverage-policy-changes?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/anthem-er-coverage-policy-changes?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 16 Feb 2018 11:50:13 CST Leslie Small at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Seeking to address mounting concerns from providers and other stakeholders, Anthem has made changes to policies it previously rolled out that restrict coverage for emergency room visits. The insurer has implemented a series of “always pay” exceptions for certain circumstances, like when the patient received any kind of surgery or an MRI or CT scan. VA head Shulkin to reimburse disputed European travel expenses, but Dems call for hearing over controversy http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/healthcare/va-head-s-european-trip-drama-continues-shulkin-will-reimburse-disputed-expenses-but-won?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/healthcare/va-head-s-european-trip-drama-continues-shulkin-will-reimburse-disputed-expenses-but-won?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 16 Feb 2018 10:30:06 CST Ilene MacDonald at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Veterans Affairs Secretary David Shulkin, M.D., says he will reimburse travel expenses that were the subject of an internal investigation into a trip he took to Europe this summer, but that may not put an end to the controversy. One lawmaker has called for Shulkin’s resignation, and four Democrats have requested a hearing about the trip.