MedClimate Health News Daily http://medclimate.com/feed en-us Copyright MedClimate, Inc2019 HL7 gives a glimpse of FHIR 5 http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/hl7-gives-glimpse-fhir-5 http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/hl7-gives-glimpse-fhir-5 Mon, 21 Jan 2019 12:16:33 CST tsullivan at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy Health Level 7 International on Monday offered a peek at its roadmap for Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources, aka FHIR 5. WHY IT MATTERS FHIR is widely viewed as holding great promise for enabling health data sharing among vendors, providers, payers, government, health information exchanges and other entities.  THE LARGER TREND HL7 earlier this month posted the eagerly awaited FHIR 4 iteration — which is the first version of the interoperability specification to be normative. That was seen as a milestone for EHR and other software vendors, as well as startups and innovative hospitals looking to implement FHIR can now plan future versions including and beyond FHIR 5 being backward compatible with FHIR 4.  Several electronic health record vendors, in fact, run developer programs in which third party innovators can use FHIR and open APIs to build on their platforms. Among the needs for such programs to thrive is a single version of FHIR and broader support for the spec. What’s more, the biggest software companies in the world continue homing in on healthcare. Amazon, Google, IBM, Microsoft, Oracle and Salesforce, in fact, came together during a White House hackathon over the summit in a pledge to eradicate interoperability barriers that was noticeably short on details other than to say cloud, FHIR, and the Argonaut Project will somehow be involved. WHAT FHIR 5 WILL BRING FHIR Product Director Grahame Grieve explained on the HL7 blog that FHIR 5 will build on FHR 4 with more content formally becoming normative, enhanced publishing implementation guides, additional content in new domains, improved support for apps that use more than one version of FHIR, multi-language support, federated servers and "new facilities for migrating data to and from v2 messages and CDA documents." ON THE RECORD "The community will continue to develop the adjunct specifications to FHIR – SMART App Launch, CDS Hooks, FHIRCast, CQL, Bulk Data specification, and others – that build out a complete API-based ecosystem for the exchange of healthcare data," Grieve wrote. "HL7 will also continue to collaborate with our many partners across industry, government, and academic communities to support the overall development of data exchange and health process improvement." Grieve said HL7’s normal development cycle is about 20 months, so FHIR 5 could be ready in 2020 — but he also added that the organization will survey its members to see if they would prefer waiting longer to ease the convergence to a single version. Twitter: @SullyHIT Email the writer: tom.sullivan@himssmedia.com Healthcare IT News is a HIMSS Media publication. 

Health Level 7 International on Monday offered a peek at its roadmap for Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources, aka FHIR 5.

WHY IT MATTERS
FHIR is widely viewed as holding great promise for enabling health data sharing among vendors, providers, payers, government, health information exchanges and other entities. 

THE LARGER TREND
HL7 earlier this month posted the eagerly awaited FHIR 4 iteration — which is the first version of the interoperability specification to be normative.

That was seen as a milestone for EHR and other software vendors, as well as startups and innovative hospitals looking to implement FHIR can now plan future versions including and beyond FHIR 5 being backward compatible with FHIR 4. 

Several electronic health record vendors, in fact, run developer programs in which third party innovators can use FHIR and open APIs to build on their platforms. Among the needs for such programs to thrive is a single version of FHIR and broader support for the spec.

What’s more, the biggest software companies in the world continue homing in on healthcare. Amazon, Google, IBM, Microsoft, Oracle and Salesforce, in fact, came together during a White House hackathon over the summit in a pledge to eradicate interoperability barriers that was noticeably short on details other than to say cloud, FHIR, and the Argonaut Project will somehow be involved.

WHAT FHIR 5 WILL BRING
FHIR Product Director Grahame Grieve explained on the HL7 blog that FHIR 5 will build on FHR 4 with more content formally becoming normative, enhanced publishing implementation guides, additional content in new domains, improved support for apps that use more than one version of FHIR, multi-language support, federated servers and "new facilities for migrating data to and from v2 messages and CDA documents."

ON THE RECORD
"The community will continue to develop the adjunct specifications to FHIR – SMART App Launch, CDS Hooks, FHIRCast, CQL, Bulk Data specification, and others – that build out a complete API-based ecosystem for the exchange of healthcare data," Grieve wrote. "HL7 will also continue to collaborate with our many partners across industry, government, and academic communities to support the overall development of data exchange and health process improvement."

Grieve said HL7’s normal development cycle is about 20 months, so FHIR 5 could be ready in 2020 — but he also added that the organization will survey its members to see if they would prefer waiting longer to ease the convergence to a single version.

Twitter: @SullyHIT
Email the writer: tom.sullivan@himssmedia.com

Healthcare IT News is a HIMSS Media publication. 

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How HIEs can enable public health reporting when EHRs fall short http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/how-hies-can-enable-public-health-reporting-when-ehrs-fall-short http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/how-hies-can-enable-public-health-reporting-when-ehrs-fall-short Mon, 21 Jan 2019 08:42:20 CST tsullivan at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy Healthcare’s Holy Grail of widespread information sharing holds considerable promise as well as daunting challenges and public health reporting is among the places it is playing out. "Interoperability can automate routine reporting processes that can alleviate burden on providers while improving data gathering processes for public health organizations," said Brian Dixon, a research scientist at Regenstrief Institute. But Dixon explained that hospitals and public health face a number of obstacles today. For starters, local health departments have yet to implement the infrastructure necessary to receive digital reports. "They rely on paper and require help from a larger health system or health information exchange network," Dixon said. Also, providers at times do not completely understand all of the diseases they should be reporting to public health departments. And others simply presume that someone else is responsible for reporting for them – or, in certain cases, Dixon said the people and resources to complete that reporting do not always exist. It doesn’t help either that state laws about reporting conditions and criteria vary, which Dixon added make harmonization a necessity. What’s more, few EHR platforms are currently capable of facilitating data transfer to public health departments. That's where health information exchanges can come in. Dixon pointed to three key ways HIEs can facilitate information sharing to overcome the obstacles outlined above. First, HIE networks can harmonize reporting requirements to help providers better understand what they should alert health departments about and what they do not need to. "Regional HIE networks are well positioned to harmonize regional laws that might vary," Dixon said.   Second, HIE networks can harmonize messages and data. This includes health information residing in otherwise disparate EHR systems as well as standards for submitting information to public health authorities. Dixon pointed for example to the ability translate certain lab test names to LOINC codes to enable reporting into the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.   And third, HIE networks can help with interfaces for connecting various EHR systems to public health infrastructure. "The regional HIE entities know their health system landscape and can navigate the key players, engage public health organizations in dialogue with health system leadership, and can develop interfaces that connect the health system players together," Dixon said.   Dixon will address these obstacles and opportunities during a HIMSS19 session, “Enhanced Public Health Reporting Using an HIE Network,” is scheduled for Wednesday, February 13, from 1:00-2:00 p.m. in room W230A. HIMSS19 Preview An inside look at the innovation, education, technology, networking and key events at the HIMSS19 global conference in Orlando. Twitter: SullyHIT Email the writer: tom.sullivan@himssmedia.com  Healthcare IT News is a HIMSS Media publication. 

Healthcare’s Holy Grail of widespread information sharing holds considerable promise as well as daunting challenges and public health reporting is among the places it is playing out.

"Interoperability can automate routine reporting processes that can alleviate burden on providers while improving data gathering processes for public health organizations," said Brian Dixon, a research scientist at Regenstrief Institute.

But Dixon explained that hospitals and public health face a number of obstacles today.

For starters, local health departments have yet to implement the infrastructure necessary to receive digital reports. "They rely on paper and require help from a larger health system or health information exchange network," Dixon said.

Also, providers at times do not completely understand all of the diseases they should be reporting to public health departments. And others simply presume that someone else is responsible for reporting for them – or, in certain cases, Dixon said the people and resources to complete that reporting do not always exist.

It doesn’t help either that state laws about reporting conditions and criteria vary, which Dixon added make harmonization a necessity.

What’s more, few EHR platforms are currently capable of facilitating data transfer to public health departments.

That's where health information exchanges can come in. Dixon pointed to three key ways HIEs can facilitate information sharing to overcome the obstacles outlined above.

First, HIE networks can harmonize reporting requirements to help providers better understand what they should alert health departments about and what they do not need to. "Regional HIE networks are well positioned to harmonize regional laws that might vary," Dixon said.  

Second, HIE networks can harmonize messages and data.

This includes health information residing in otherwise disparate EHR systems as well as standards for submitting information to public health authorities. Dixon pointed for example to the ability translate certain lab test names to LOINC codes to enable reporting into the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  

And third, HIE networks can help with interfaces for connecting various EHR systems to public health infrastructure.

"The regional HIE entities know their health system landscape and can navigate the key players, engage public health organizations in dialogue with health system leadership, and can develop interfaces that connect the health system players together," Dixon said.  

Dixon will address these obstacles and opportunities during a HIMSS19 session, “Enhanced Public Health Reporting Using an HIE Network,” is scheduled for Wednesday, February 13, from 1:00-2:00 p.m. in room W230A.

HIMSS19 Preview

An inside look at the innovation, education, technology, networking and key events at the HIMSS19 global conference in Orlando.

Twitter: SullyHIT
Email the writer: tom.sullivan@himssmedia.com 

Healthcare IT News is a HIMSS Media publication. 

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GAO's latest report on patient matching: It's still not easy http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/gaos-latest-report-matching-patients-records-its-still-not-easy http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/gaos-latest-report-matching-patients-records-its-still-not-easy Fri, 18 Jan 2019 14:16:04 CST mmiliard at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy The whole point of electronic health records is to facilitate the sharing of patient data, but that is still difficult, not just because interoperability hasn't been fully achieved, but also because matching patient records is still not easy to achieve – putting patients at risk for incorrect care and also posing privacy concerns, according to a new report by the Government Accountability Office. The report, titled, "Approaches and Challenges to Electronically Matching Patients' Records across Providers," says there two ways that records are failed to be matched accurately. These include: Records for different patients are mistakenly matched. When this happens, health, safety and privacy are in jeopardy. A provider may use a diagnosis or medication information for the wrong patient. Or, if the wrong patient's medical information is added to another patient's record, the first patient's privacy has been breached. Records for the same patient are not matched. When medical records for the same patient are not matched, providers don't have all the information they need to provide proper care. For the study, GAO interviewed representatives from physician practices and hospitals to find out how they match patient records. Some of them told GAO they have worked to improve the consistency with which they format demographic data in their electronic health records. Multiple stakeholders said no single effort would solve the challenge of patient record matching. Stakeholders suggested these general ways the healthcare community could improve how patient records are matched: implement common standards for recording demographic data; share best practices and other resources; and   develop a public-private collaboration to improve matching. When it comes to the role the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT (ONC) should play, most interviewed for the survey weren't sure. However, some suggested that ONC could require demographic data standards for health IT certification, while others said the agency should push voluntary adoption of the standards. WHY IT MATTERS Healthcare providers are increasingly sharing patients' health records electronically. When a patient's records are shared with another provider, it is important to accurately match them to the correct patient. GAO and others have reported that accurately matching patient health records is a barrier to health information exchange. GAO cites a 2014 study found that as few as 50 percent of records are accurately matched when organizations exchange information. In the American Hospital Association's 2017 survey, 45 percent of large hospitals reported that difficulties in accurately identifying patients across health IT systems limited health information exchange. THE LARGER TREND GAO points out how important industry standards are for entering names and identifying data into an EHR, and recommends ONC's Interoperability Standards Advisory Reference as a way to ensure accurate matching. The latest version was just released Jan. 15, and was based on 74 comment letters, including nearly 400 individual recommendations for revisions. A standards-based health ecosystem is also critical, and this year's HIMSS Global Conference and Exhibition's Interoperability Showcase next month Orlando  will feature 82 organizations demonstrating 121 health IT systems across 16 different use-cases. The showcase is designed to get at the heart of what the true value of interoperability really is, said Christel Anderson, senior director, interoperability initiatives, at HIMSS. Diana Manos is a Washington, D.C.-area freelance writer specializing in healthcare, wellness and technology.  Twitter: @Diana_Manos Email the writer: dnewsprovider@gmail.com  Healthcare IT News is a HIMSS Media publication.   

The whole point of electronic health records is to facilitate the sharing of patient data, but that is still difficult, not just because interoperability hasn't been fully achieved, but also because matching patient records is still not easy to achieve – putting patients at risk for incorrect care and also posing privacy concerns, according to a new report by the Government Accountability Office.

The report, titled, "Approaches and Challenges to Electronically Matching Patients' Records across Providers," says there two ways that records are failed to be matched accurately. These include:

Records for different patients are mistakenly matched. When this happens, health, safety and privacy are in jeopardy. A provider may use a diagnosis or medication information for the wrong patient. Or, if the wrong patient's medical information is added to another patient's record, the first patient's privacy has been breached.
Records for the same patient are not matched. When medical records for the same patient are not matched, providers don't have all the information they need to provide proper care.

For the study, GAO interviewed representatives from physician practices and hospitals to find out how they match patient records.

Some of them told GAO they have worked to improve the consistency with which they format demographic data in their electronic health records. Multiple stakeholders said no single effort would solve the challenge of patient record matching.
Stakeholders suggested these general ways the healthcare community could improve how patient records are matched:

  • implement common standards for recording demographic data;
  • share best practices and other resources; and  
  • develop a public-private collaboration to improve matching.

When it comes to the role the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT (ONC) should play, most interviewed for the survey weren't sure. However, some suggested that ONC could require demographic data standards for health IT certification, while others said the agency should push voluntary adoption of the standards.

WHY IT MATTERS
Healthcare providers are increasingly sharing patients' health records electronically. When a patient's records are shared with another provider, it is important to accurately match them to the correct patient. GAO and others have reported that accurately matching patient health records is a barrier to health information exchange.

GAO cites a 2014 study found that as few as 50 percent of records are accurately matched when organizations exchange information. In the American Hospital Association's 2017 survey, 45 percent of large hospitals reported that difficulties in accurately identifying patients across health IT systems limited health information exchange.

THE LARGER TREND
GAO points out how important industry standards are for entering names and identifying data into an EHR, and recommends ONC's Interoperability Standards Advisory Reference as a way to ensure accurate matching. The latest version was just released Jan. 15, and was based on 74 comment letters, including nearly 400 individual recommendations for revisions.

A standards-based health ecosystem is also critical, and this year's HIMSS Global Conference and Exhibition's Interoperability Showcase next month Orlando  will feature 82 organizations demonstrating 121 health IT systems across 16 different use-cases. The showcase is designed to get at the heart of what the true value of interoperability really is, said Christel Anderson, senior director, interoperability initiatives, at HIMSS.

Diana Manos is a Washington, D.C.-area freelance writer specializing in healthcare, wellness and technology. 

Twitter: @Diana_Manos
Email the writer: dnewsprovider@gmail.com 

Healthcare IT News is a HIMSS Media publication. 

 

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Here’s the lineup of HIMSS19 keynote speakers http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/here’s-lineup-himss19-keynote-speakers http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/here’s-lineup-himss19-keynote-speakers Fri, 18 Jan 2019 08:55:34 CST Susan Morse at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy HIMSS on Thursday finalized the lineup of keynote speakers for HIMSS19 in Orlando next month. Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar is the latest speaker named. Azar and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Administrator Seema Verma, in fact, will share their vision for interoperability and patient engagement to bring down prescription drug costs, ramp-up value-based risk-taking and throw away our fax machines. Titled "Special Views Session: Interoperability and patient engagement," is slated for Tuesday, Feb. 12, from 5:30-6:30 p.m. in room W320.  Dr. Atul Gawande, CEO of the new Boston-based healthcare company formed by Amazon, Berkshire Hathaway and JPMorgan Chase, was originally slated to keynote but is no longer on the schedule. “We had a conversation with Atul Gawande and he stated he is not available to speak at HIMSS19,” said Karen Malone, vice president of meetings and sales at HIMSS. “We discussed and are hopeful he will speak for HIMSS at a future event.”   HIMSS CEO Hal Wolf will serve as moderator in the oepning keynonte, Will consumer-directed exhange disrupt the healthcare marketplace?" The panelists are: Aneesh Chopra, former U.S. CTO, co-founder of the CARIN Alliance and current President of CareJourney; Dr. Karen DeSalvo, former national coordinator for Health IT and a profesor of medicine and population health at Dell Medical School; Michael Leavitt, former Utah Governor, HHS secretary and co-founder of the CARIN Alliance; and Verma of CMS. That opening panel is scheduled for Tuesday, Feb. 12 from 8:30-10:00 a.m. in the Valencia Ballroom.  On Wednesday evening, Adam Boehler, CMS deputy administrator and director of the CMS Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation, will speak during a special session that runs from 5:30-6:30 p.m. in room W320.  Friday morning will feature a double-header with both Dr. Donald Rucker, head of the Office of National Coordinator for Health IT, and Susan DeVore, president and CEO of Premier, each taking the stage. For the closing keynote that afternoon, Not Impossible founder Mick Ebeling, named one of the most influential, creative people by The Creativity 50’s and a recipient of the Muhammad Ali Humanitarian of the Year Award, is scheduled to speak from 1:15-2:30 p.m. HIMSS19 is being held Feb. 11 to Feb. 15, at the Orange County Convention Center in Orlando, Florida. Twitter: @SusanJMorse Email the writer: susan.morse@himssmedia.com HIMSS19 Preview An inside look at the innovation, education, technology, networking and key events at the HIMSS19 global conference in Orlando.

HIMSS on Thursday finalized the lineup of keynote speakers for HIMSS19 in Orlando next month.

Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar is the latest speaker named. Azar and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Administrator Seema Verma, in fact, will share their vision for interoperability and patient engagement to bring down prescription drug costs, ramp-up value-based risk-taking and throw away our fax machines. Titled "Special Views Session: Interoperability and patient engagement," is slated for Tuesday, Feb. 12, from 5:30-6:30 p.m. in room W320. 

Dr. Atul Gawande, CEO of the new Boston-based healthcare company formed by Amazon, Berkshire Hathaway and JPMorgan Chase, was originally slated to keynote but is no longer on the schedule.

“We had a conversation with Atul Gawande and he stated he is not available to speak at HIMSS19,” said Karen Malone, vice president of meetings and sales at HIMSS. “We discussed and are hopeful he will speak for HIMSS at a future event.”  

HIMSS CEO Hal Wolf will serve as moderator in the oepning keynonte, Will consumer-directed exhange disrupt the healthcare marketplace?" The panelists are: Aneesh Chopra, former U.S. CTO, co-founder of the CARIN Alliance and current President of CareJourney; Dr. Karen DeSalvo, former national coordinator for Health IT and a profesor of medicine and population health at Dell Medical School; Michael Leavitt, former Utah Governor, HHS secretary and co-founder of the CARIN Alliance; and Verma of CMS. That opening panel is scheduled for Tuesday, Feb. 12 from 8:30-10:00 a.m. in the Valencia Ballroom. 

On Wednesday evening, Adam Boehler, CMS deputy administrator and director of the CMS Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation, will speak during a special session that runs from 5:30-6:30 p.m. in room W320. 

Friday morning will feature a double-header with both Dr. Donald Rucker, head of the Office of National Coordinator for Health IT, and Susan DeVore, president and CEO of Premier, each taking the stage.

For the closing keynote that afternoon, Not Impossible founder Mick Ebeling, named one of the most influential, creative people by The Creativity 50’s and a recipient of the Muhammad Ali Humanitarian of the Year Award, is scheduled to speak from 1:15-2:30 p.m.

HIMSS19 is being held Feb. 11 to Feb. 15, at the Orange County Convention Center in Orlando, Florida.

Twitter: @SusanJMorse
Email the writer: susan.morse@himssmedia.com

HIMSS19 Preview

An inside look at the innovation, education, technology, networking and key events at the HIMSS19 global conference in Orlando.

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New Findings Reveal Surprising Role of the Cerebellum in Reward and Social Behaviors http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/new-findings-reveal-surprising-role-cerebellum-reward-social-behaviors http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/new-findings-reveal-surprising-role-cerebellum-reward-social-behaviors Thu, 17 Jan 2019 19:00:00 CST NIH News Release NIH-funded study sheds new light on brain circuits related to affective and social dysfunction. ]]> AMIA to feds: incentivize the use of clinical data to support research http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/amia-feds-incentivize-use-clinical-data-support-research http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/amia-feds-incentivize-use-clinical-data-support-research Thu, 17 Jan 2019 11:32:32 CST tsullivan at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy The U.S. is fully invested in electronic health records, and now it’s time to get more serious about using clinical data to support research, according to the American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA). In a paper published in the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association (JAMIA) and titled, “Reimagining the research-practice relationship: policy recommendations for informatics-enabled evidence-generation across the US health system,” AMIA authors recommend a dozen public policies that could help get the data being driven in clinical settings into the hands of researchers. WHY IT MATTERS Data-driven healthcare “is now within reach, and holds great promise,” AMIA authors wrote. “However, despite the unprecedented volumes of clinical data generated each day across hospitals, physician offices, urgent care facilities, and neighborhood walk-in clinics, the ability to leverage these data to increase our knowledge of health and disease and drive improvements in care remain overwhelmingly unrealized.” THE BIGGER TREND AMIA urges the federal government to write policies that would: Reimburse and incentivize providers to use their clinical data for research Enable patients and doctors to determine how the data is used for research, while also giving them access to research results. Make it easier to launch clinical research across organizations Ensure the sustainability of a “national research ecosystem” In addition, AMIA offered  list of activities for the federal government that have heretofore been neglected and would move the research forward, and include: “Faithfully implement” 21st Century Cures Act of 2016 provisions for evidence generation Establish the Research Policy Board, also mandated by the Cures Act, to align research regulations Refine the definition of a HIPAA Designated Record Set Explore ways to give patients a full digital export of their structured and unstructured data ON THE RECORD “Increasingly, clinical care activities generate the data foundations for biomedical and health services research,” said paper lead author and AMIA Board Chair, Peter Embi, MD, president and CEO of the Regenstrief Institute. “If we are to realize the promise of our national investment in health IT, we must reimagine how research relates to clinical practice – and vice versa – so that we can learn systematically from each healthcare encounter, facilitate biomedical discovery, and advance our collective understanding of health. This is core to evidence-generating medicine and the creation of learning health systems.” Diana Manos is a Washington, D.C.-area freelance writer specializing in healthcare, wellness and technology.  Twitter: @Diana_Manos Email the writer: dnewsprovider@gmail.com  Healthcare IT News is a HIMSS Media publication. 

The U.S. is fully invested in electronic health records, and now it’s time to get more serious about using clinical data to support research, according to the American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA).

In a paper published in the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association (JAMIA) and titled, “Reimagining the research-practice relationship: policy recommendations for informatics-enabled evidence-generation across the US health system,” AMIA authors recommend a dozen public policies that could help get the data being driven in clinical settings into the hands of researchers.

WHY IT MATTERS

Data-driven healthcare “is now within reach, and holds great promise,” AMIA authors wrote. “However, despite the unprecedented volumes of clinical data generated each day across hospitals, physician offices, urgent care facilities, and neighborhood walk-in clinics, the ability to leverage these data to increase our knowledge of health and disease and drive improvements in care remain overwhelmingly unrealized.”

THE BIGGER TREND

AMIA urges the federal government to write policies that would:

  • Reimburse and incentivize providers to use their clinical data for research
  • Enable patients and doctors to determine how the data is used for research, while also giving them access to research results.
  • Make it easier to launch clinical research across organizations
  • Ensure the sustainability of a “national research ecosystem”

In addition, AMIA offered  list of activities for the federal government that have heretofore been neglected and would move the research forward, and include:

  • “Faithfully implement” 21st Century Cures Act of 2016 provisions for evidence generation
  • Establish the Research Policy Board, also mandated by the Cures Act, to align research regulations
  • Refine the definition of a HIPAA Designated Record Set
  • Explore ways to give patients a full digital export of their structured and unstructured data

ON THE RECORD

“Increasingly, clinical care activities generate the data foundations for biomedical and health services research,” said paper lead author and AMIA Board Chair, Peter Embi, MD, president and CEO of the Regenstrief Institute. “If we are to realize the promise of our national investment in health IT, we must reimagine how research relates to clinical practice – and vice versa – so that we can learn systematically from each healthcare encounter, facilitate biomedical discovery, and advance our collective understanding of health. This is core to evidence-generating medicine and the creation of learning health systems.”

Diana Manos is a Washington, D.C.-area freelance writer specializing in healthcare, wellness and technology. 

Twitter: @Diana_Manos
Email the writer: dnewsprovider@gmail.com 

Healthcare IT News is a HIMSS Media publication. 

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Here are 6 major issues facing healthcare in 2019, according to PwC http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/here-are-6-major-issues-facing-healthcare-2019-according-pwc http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/here-are-6-major-issues-facing-healthcare-2019-according-pwc Thu, 17 Jan 2019 11:09:13 CST at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com Connected care, upskilled workers, tax reform, a Southwest Airlines approach, private equity and the Affordable Care Act all will impact healthcare organizations in 2019, a new PwC report says. Pew: Here's what APIs need to succeed for healthcare http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/pew-heres-what-apis-need-succeed-healthcare http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/pew-heres-what-apis-need-succeed-healthcare Thu, 17 Jan 2019 08:41:58 CST tsullivan at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy Application programming interfaces are all the rage in healthcare and just about every other industry undergoing digital transformation. And with the release of Health Level 7’s Fast Health Interoperability Resources 4 earlier this month, the excitement around open APIs, FHIR and data interoperability just kicked into a higher gear. “Increasing the use of APIs could represent a dramatic shift in how health data is accessed, extracted, and utilized to improve patient care. APIs can help get patients their data, support information exchange among healthcare facilities, and enable enhanced clinical decision support tool,” said Ben Moscovitch, project director of health information technology at Pew Charitable Trusts. Indeed, the 21st Century Cures Act gives the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT the opportunity to advance standards around open API, FHIR included, and to encourage vocabularies and code sets for clinical concepts, Moscovitch added, while the private sector has been making strides of its own. Consider the Argonaut Project, CommonWell Health Alliance and Carequality, which last year reached an interoperability milestone of sorts when the organizations made their connectivity live nationwide such that healthcare facilities that belong to either can now bilaterally exchange CCDs with any other participating member. Yet, obstacles remain. The industry continues awaiting information blocking rules from ONC, for instance, and the agency is working on draft regulations outlining requirements for APIs that are expected to ease the exchange of health data. “ONC should not miss this opportunity to advance the effective use of APIs, such as by ensuring that more data are exchanged, appropriate standards are used, and longitudinal data are made available, among many other steps,” Moscovitch said. Finalizing the rules is one thing, of course. Hospitals, health systems, payers and other entities still have to put them to use. “For APIs to reach their full potential,” Moscovitch said, “industry and government should ensure that APIs can access more patient information, and work to begin breaking down other barriers that hamper them being able to effectively share data.” Moscovitch, along with Jeffrey Smith, vice president of public policy at the American Medical Informatics Association, will offer more insights at HIMSS19 during a session titled “Unlocking EHRs: How APIs usher in a new data change era.” It’s scheduled for Wednesday, Feb 13, from 1:00-2:00 p.m. in room W303A. HIMSS19 Preview An inside look at the innovation, education, technology, networking and key events at the HIMSS19 global conference in Orlando. Twitter: SullyHIT Email the writer: tom.sullivan@himssmedia.com  Healthcare IT News is a HIMSS Media publication. 

Application programming interfaces are all the rage in healthcare and just about every other industry undergoing digital transformation. And with the release of Health Level 7’s Fast Health Interoperability Resources 4 earlier this month, the excitement around open APIs, FHIR and data interoperability just kicked into a higher gear.

“Increasing the use of APIs could represent a dramatic shift in how health data is accessed, extracted, and utilized to improve patient care. APIs can help get patients their data, support information exchange among healthcare facilities, and enable enhanced clinical decision support tool,” said Ben Moscovitch, project director of health information technology at Pew Charitable Trusts.

Indeed, the 21st Century Cures Act gives the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT the opportunity to advance standards around open API, FHIR included, and to encourage vocabularies and code sets for clinical concepts, Moscovitch added, while the private sector has been making strides of its own.

Consider the Argonaut Project, CommonWell Health Alliance and Carequality, which last year reached an interoperability milestone of sorts when the organizations made their connectivity live nationwide such that healthcare facilities that belong to either can now bilaterally exchange CCDs with any other participating member.

Yet, obstacles remain. The industry continues awaiting information blocking rules from ONC, for instance, and the agency is working on draft regulations outlining requirements for APIs that are expected to ease the exchange of health data.

“ONC should not miss this opportunity to advance the effective use of APIs, such as by ensuring that more data are exchanged, appropriate standards are used, and longitudinal data are made available, among many other steps,” Moscovitch said.

Finalizing the rules is one thing, of course. Hospitals, health systems, payers and other entities still have to put them to use.

“For APIs to reach their full potential,” Moscovitch said, “industry and government should ensure that APIs can access more patient information, and work to begin breaking down other barriers that hamper them being able to effectively share data.”

Moscovitch, along with Jeffrey Smith, vice president of public policy at the American Medical Informatics Association, will offer more insights at HIMSS19 during a session titled “Unlocking EHRs: How APIs usher in a new data change era.” It’s scheduled for Wednesday, Feb 13, from 1:00-2:00 p.m. in room W303A.

HIMSS19 Preview

An inside look at the innovation, education, technology, networking and key events at the HIMSS19 global conference in Orlando.

Twitter: SullyHIT
Email the writer: tom.sullivan@himssmedia.com 

Healthcare IT News is a HIMSS Media publication. 

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Singapore’s Minister for Health outlines key responses to COI report’s recommendations http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/singapore’s-minister-health-outlines-key-responses-coi-report’s-recommendations http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/singapore’s-minister-health-outlines-key-responses-coi-report’s-recommendations Wed, 16 Jan 2019 20:23:11 CST deankoh at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy Minister for Health Gan Kim Yong delivered a ministerial statement on the Committee of Inquiry (COI) report on the SingHealth cyberattack in the Singapore Parliament on January 15 2019. In the statement, he said that the Ministry of Health (MOH) has appointed a Cybersecurity Advisory Committee to conduct a horizontal review of the cybersecurity governance structures and processes across the public healthcare clusters and Integrated Health Information Systems (IHiS), the IT agency for the Ministry. He also outlined four key responses to the COI report’s recommendations. The first is enhancing governance and organisational structures as there is a “need for clearer cybersecurity risk ownership and accountability between IHiS and the public healthcare clusters, underpinned by a strong relationship to avoid fragmenting the Ministry’s healthcare IT strategy.” At MOH, the Chief Information Security Officer (CISO) is currently also the Director of Cyber Security Governance at IHiS but these roles will be separated. The MOH CISO will be supported by a dedicated office in MOH and report to the Permanent Secretary. The MOH CISO office will be the cybersecurity sector lead for the healthcare sector. It will coordinate efforts to protect Critical Information Infrastructure in the healthcare sector, and ensure that the sector fulfils its regulatory obligations under the Cybersecurity Act.  For its part, IHiS will have its own separate Director of Cyber Security Governance. At the clusters, the cluster Group CIO office will now be made fully accountable to the respective cluster management and Boards. The GCIO office will be adequately resourced to carry out its role. The position of the Cluster Information Security Officer will be elevated to report directly to cluster management, and be accountable to the IT and Risk Management Committees of the cluster Boards. Secondly, a cybersecurity model with multiple lines of defence will be put in place. A more robust ‘Three Lines of Defence’ structure within the public healthcare: The first line comprises units and personnel who develop, deliver and operate the IT systems. This is the Delivery Group. MOH will strengthen the IT delivery group to better integrate cybersecurity into IT delivery initiatives, improve the management of network security, and increase emphasis on security architecture and monitoring.    The second line of defence comprises units and personnel who have the specific responsibility to oversee security strategy, risk management and compliance. MOH will strengthen and elevate this second line of defence by establishing a dedicated Cyber Defence Group in IHiS headed by a senior leader at or equivalent to the Deputy Chief Executive level. The strengthened group will have independent oversight of cybersecurity implementation, compliance and risk management, and will oversee incident reporting and management. This will ensure that cybersecurity is managed at the senior management level, and an appropriate balance is struck between service delivery and cybersecurity considerations.   The third line of defence comprises checks and assurances independent of IHiS and our healthcare clusters, and independent of the first two lines of defence. MOH Holdings Group Internal Audit will continue to play this role. MOH also intends to commission and tap on independent third parties where appropriate. The third aspect would be improving the cybersecurity awareness and capacity of staff. Starting this year, IHiS will engage specialist providers to conduct realistic hands-on “Cyber Range” simulation training to raise the competence of their security incident response personnel. IHiS also intends to learn from GovTech’s bug bounty and vulnerability disclosure programmes and start similar efforts. Lastly, a tiered model of Internet access will be considered. In its report, the COI has recommended that an internet access strategy which minimises exposure to external threats should be implemented. Following the cyberattack, temporary Internet Surfing Separation (ISS) was implemented across Singapore’s public healthcare sector. However, the implementation of the ISS has posed several challenges in the provision of patient care in some areas such as emergency care, decision-support for prescriptions and treatments, access to patient education resources, and booking of clinical appointments. ISS also caused delays to frontline patient management and backend administrative tasks. Research and education initiatives in the public healthcare institutions have also been impacted by ISS. The current model of ISS is still workable but there needs to be longer-term solutions that are more efficient and sustainable. One such solution is the “virtual browser”, which allows access to the Internet through strictly controlled and monitored client servers. The client server acts like a decontamination room in which a file is opened and only an image/copy of the file is taken and sent to the recipient. In this manner, any malicious material or hidden content is ‘left behind’ in the decontamination room, greatly reducing cybersecurity risks. This “virtual browser” pilot will begin in the first quarter in 2019 at the National University Health System. “Virtual browsers” will be deployed in selected job functions at selected departments and clinics. Some of the job roles participating in the pilot include frontline pharmacists, and emergency department clinicians. The conduct and evaluation of the pilot is expected to take about 6 months and MOH will closely with the Cybersecurity Agency of Singapore (CSA) to assess the cybersecurity adequacy of the solution. The effectiveness of the Virtual Brower will also be assessed. Mandatory contributions to the National Electronic Health Record (NEHR) system will continue to be deferred as it is undergoing a series of cybersecurity assessments conducted by the CSA, GovTech, and independent firm PwC. The NEHR will also be subject to further testing and reviews, including exercises to test its defences against targeted attacks, as well as business continuity and disaster recovery plans.

Minister for Health Gan Kim Yong delivered a ministerial statement on the Committee of Inquiry (COI) report on the SingHealth cyberattack in the Singapore Parliament on January 15 2019. In the statement, he said that the Ministry of Health (MOH) has appointed a Cybersecurity Advisory Committee to conduct a horizontal review of the cybersecurity governance structures and processes across the public healthcare clusters and Integrated Health Information Systems (IHiS), the IT agency for the Ministry.

He also outlined four key responses to the COI report’s recommendations. The first is enhancing governance and organisational structures as there is a “need for clearer cybersecurity risk ownership and accountability between IHiS and the public healthcare clusters, underpinned by a strong relationship to avoid fragmenting the Ministry’s healthcare IT strategy.”

At MOH, the Chief Information Security Officer (CISO) is currently also the Director of Cyber Security Governance at IHiS but these roles will be separated. The MOH CISO will be supported by a dedicated office in MOH and report to the Permanent Secretary. The MOH CISO office will be the cybersecurity sector lead for the healthcare sector. It will coordinate efforts to protect Critical Information Infrastructure in the healthcare sector, and ensure that the sector fulfils its regulatory obligations under the Cybersecurity Act.  For its part, IHiS will have its own separate Director of Cyber Security Governance.

At the clusters, the cluster Group CIO office will now be made fully accountable to the respective cluster management and Boards. The GCIO office will be adequately resourced to carry out its role. The position of the Cluster Information Security Officer will be elevated to report directly to cluster management, and be accountable to the IT and Risk Management Committees of the cluster Boards.

Secondly, a cybersecurity model with multiple lines of defence will be put in place. A more robust ‘Three Lines of Defence’ structure within the public healthcare:

  • The first line comprises units and personnel who develop, deliver and operate the IT systems. This is the Delivery Group. MOH will strengthen the IT delivery group to better integrate cybersecurity into IT delivery initiatives, improve the management of network security, and increase emphasis on security architecture and monitoring. 
     
  • The second line of defence comprises units and personnel who have the specific responsibility to oversee security strategy, risk management and compliance. MOH will strengthen and elevate this second line of defence by establishing a dedicated Cyber Defence Group in IHiS headed by a senior leader at or equivalent to the Deputy Chief Executive level. The strengthened group will have independent oversight of cybersecurity implementation, compliance and risk management, and will oversee incident reporting and management. This will ensure that cybersecurity is managed at the senior management level, and an appropriate balance is struck between service delivery and cybersecurity considerations.
     
  • The third line of defence comprises checks and assurances independent of IHiS and our healthcare clusters, and independent of the first two lines of defence. MOH Holdings Group Internal Audit will continue to play this role. MOH also intends to commission and tap on independent third parties where appropriate.

The third aspect would be improving the cybersecurity awareness and capacity of staff. Starting this year, IHiS will engage specialist providers to conduct realistic hands-on “Cyber Range” simulation training to raise the competence of their security incident response personnel. IHiS also intends to learn from GovTech’s bug bounty and vulnerability disclosure programmes and start similar efforts.

Lastly, a tiered model of Internet access will be considered. In its report, the COI has recommended that an internet access strategy which minimises exposure to external threats should be implemented. Following the cyberattack, temporary Internet Surfing Separation (ISS) was implemented across Singapore’s public healthcare sector.

However, the implementation of the ISS has posed several challenges in the provision of patient care in some areas such as emergency care, decision-support for prescriptions and treatments, access to patient education resources, and booking of clinical appointments. ISS also caused delays to frontline patient management and backend administrative tasks. Research and education initiatives in the public healthcare institutions have also been impacted by ISS.

The current model of ISS is still workable but there needs to be longer-term solutions that are more efficient and sustainable. One such solution is the “virtual browser”, which allows access to the Internet through strictly controlled and monitored client servers. The client server acts like a decontamination room in which a file is opened and only an image/copy of the file is taken and sent to the recipient. In this manner, any malicious material or hidden content is ‘left behind’ in the decontamination room, greatly reducing cybersecurity risks.

This “virtual browser” pilot will begin in the first quarter in 2019 at the National University Health System. “Virtual browsers” will be deployed in selected job functions at selected departments and clinics. Some of the job roles participating in the pilot include frontline pharmacists, and emergency department clinicians.

The conduct and evaluation of the pilot is expected to take about 6 months and MOH will closely with the Cybersecurity Agency of Singapore (CSA) to assess the cybersecurity adequacy of the solution. The effectiveness of the Virtual Brower will also be assessed.

Mandatory contributions to the National Electronic Health Record (NEHR) system will continue to be deferred as it is undergoing a series of cybersecurity assessments conducted by the CSA, GovTech, and independent firm PwC. The NEHR will also be subject to further testing and reviews, including exercises to test its defences against targeted attacks, as well as business continuity and disaster recovery plans.

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NIH researchers rescue photoreceptors, prevent blindness in animal models of retinal degeneration http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-researchers-rescue-photoreceptors-prevent-blindness-animal-models-retinal-degeneration http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-researchers-rescue-photoreceptors-prevent-blindness-animal-models-retinal-degeneration Wed, 16 Jan 2019 19:00:00 CST NIH News Release Findings set stage for first clinical trial of stem cell-based therapeutic approach for AMD. ]]> AI in healthcare - not so fast? Study outlines challenges, dangers for machine learning http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/ai-healthcare-not-so-fast-study-outlines-challenges-dangers-machine-learning http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/ai-healthcare-not-so-fast-study-outlines-challenges-dangers-machine-learning Wed, 16 Jan 2019 09:21:56 CST at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com As machine learning rapidly expands into healthcare, the ways it "learns" may be at odds with clinical outcomes unless carefully controlled for, a new study shows. UK takes pivotal step forward with central digital strategy http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/video/uk-takes-pivotal-step-forward-central-digital-strategy http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/video/uk-takes-pivotal-step-forward-central-digital-strategy Tue, 15 Jan 2019 14:25:55 CST rickdagley at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy Primary topic: Government & PolicyPrimary Topic: ComplianceAdditional Topics: PolicyMeaningful UsePolicyTechnologyEngagementPolicySpecific Terms: CompliancePatient EngagementCustom Tags: CompliancePatient EngagementDisable Auto Tagging: Short Headline: UK takes pivotal step forward with central digital strategyFeatured Decision Content: 
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ONC releases Interoperability Standards Advisory Reference 2019 http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/onc-releases-interoperability-standards-advisory-reference-2019 http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/onc-releases-interoperability-standards-advisory-reference-2019 Tue, 15 Jan 2019 09:24:47 CST tsullivan at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy The Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT (ONC) has issued its latest report on interoperability standards, following the close of comments last October 1. ONC officials said they received 74 comments on the ISA this year, resulting in nearly 400 individual recommendations for revisions. The 2019 Interoperability Standards Advisory Reference Edition (ISA), which includes recommendations from the federal Health IT Advisory Committee and changes made due to the comments from stakeholders, contains new standards and updated characteristics and calls for more efforts to make e-prescribing easier. It also encourages a more prolific patient record exchange between patients and their many care providers. The ISA is updated throughout the year for substantive and structural changes, based on ongoing dialogue, discussion, and feedback from stakeholders, ONC says. The ISA represents ONC’s “current assessment of the heath IT standards landscape,” and ONC officials note it is for informational purposes only. “It is non-binding and does not create nor confer any rights or obligations for or on any person or entity,” ONC said. WHY IT MATTERS ONC listened. “Since the 2018 comment period on the Interoperability Standards Advisory (ISA) closed on October 1, we combed through all your comments and made improvements based on your suggestions, write Steven Posnack, Chris Muir and Brett Andriesen in a Jan. 14 blog. The latest changes to the reference manual itself include RSS feed functionality to allow users to track revisions to the ISA in real-time; shifting structure from lettered sub-sections to a simple alphabetized list; and revised titles to many of the interoperability needs, to reflect their uses and align with overall ISA best practices. ONC also added more granular updates on added standards, updated characteristics, and additional information about interoperability needs. THE BIGGER TREND The Interoperability Standards Advisory (ISA) process is traditionally how ONC coordinates the identification, assessment, and public awareness of interoperability standards and implementation specifications, encouraging all stakeholders — clinical and research — to use them. ONC also encourages pilot testing of the standards. Starting with the 2017 ISA, the ISA’s focus expanded to more explicitly include public health and health research interoperability. The ISA is not exhaustive, ONC says, but it is expected to be incrementally updated to include a broader range of health IT interoperability needs. To provide the industry with a single, public list of the standards and implementation specifications that can best be used to address specific clinical health information interoperability needs. Currently, the ISA is focused on interoperability for sharing information between entities and not on intra-organizational uses.  Diana Manos is a Washington, D.C.-area freelance writer specializing in healthcare, wellness and technology.  Twitter: @Diana_Manos Email the writer: dnewsprovider@gmail.com  Healthcare IT News is a HIMSS Media publication. 

The Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT (ONC) has issued its latest report on interoperability standards, following the close of comments last October 1. ONC officials said they received 74 comments on the ISA this year, resulting in nearly 400 individual recommendations for revisions.

The 2019 Interoperability Standards Advisory Reference Edition (ISA), which includes recommendations from the federal Health IT Advisory Committee and changes made due to the comments from stakeholders, contains new standards and updated characteristics and calls for more efforts to make e-prescribing easier. It also encourages a more prolific patient record exchange between patients and their many care providers. The ISA is updated throughout the year for substantive and structural changes, based on ongoing dialogue, discussion, and feedback from stakeholders, ONC says.

The ISA represents ONC’s “current assessment of the heath IT standards landscape,” and ONC officials note it is for informational purposes only. “It is non-binding and does not create nor confer any rights or obligations for or on any person or entity,” ONC said.

WHY IT MATTERS

ONC listened. “Since the 2018 comment period on the Interoperability Standards Advisory (ISA) closed on October 1, we combed through all your comments and made improvements based on your suggestions, write Steven Posnack, Chris Muir and Brett Andriesen in a Jan. 14 blog.

The latest changes to the reference manual itself include RSS feed functionality to allow users to track revisions to the ISA in real-time; shifting structure from lettered sub-sections to a simple alphabetized list; and revised titles to many of the interoperability needs, to reflect their uses and align with overall ISA best practices.

ONC also added more granular updates on added standards, updated characteristics, and additional information about interoperability needs.

THE BIGGER TREND

The Interoperability Standards Advisory (ISA) process is traditionally how ONC coordinates the identification, assessment, and public awareness of interoperability standards and implementation specifications, encouraging all stakeholders — clinical and research — to use them. ONC also encourages pilot testing of the standards.

Starting with the 2017 ISA, the ISA’s focus expanded to more explicitly include public health and health research interoperability. The ISA is not exhaustive, ONC says, but it is expected to be incrementally updated to include a broader range of health IT interoperability needs.

To provide the industry with a single, public list of the standards and implementation specifications that can best be used to address specific clinical health information interoperability needs. Currently, the ISA is focused on interoperability for sharing information between entities and not on intra-organizational uses. 

Diana Manos is a Washington, D.C.-area freelance writer specializing in healthcare, wellness and technology. 

Twitter: @Diana_Manos
Email the writer: dnewsprovider@gmail.com 

Healthcare IT News is a HIMSS Media publication. 

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Think a strong information security posture means you’re complying with HIPAA? http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/think-strong-information-security-posture-means-you’re-complying-hipaa http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/think-strong-information-security-posture-means-you’re-complying-hipaa Tue, 15 Jan 2019 08:06:59 CST tsullivan at Healthcare IT News - Government & Policy By now it’s a well-trodden cliché to say that even the most stringent compliance with HIPAA does not mean sensitive health data is actually secure – but what about an inverse of sorts? That being the idea that strong security can be transformed into good regulatory compliance. “Good security is not enough to demonstrate HIPAA compliance,” said Adam Greene, Partner at the law firm Davis Wright Tremaine. “Even very mature information security programs are often lacking documentation that the primary regulator is expecting.” It’s not an entirely uncommon situation for hospitals to be in, either. Greene said that’s because information security shops and compliance teams often are not aligned closely enough to make it happen. “The challenge I often see is that compliance and information security are in separate silos. Information security professionals are really good at information security, but have not received education on what regulators are seeking to demonstrate compliance,” Greene said. “Compliance staff may be better at understanding how to demonstrate compliance, but may not feel like they have the competence or authority to bring their compliance skills to the information security side of the house.” Given that scenario, how can hospital and healthcare executives bridge that chasm to ensure that information security teams and compliance efforts operate in lockstep to serve both purposes? “It is a combination of documenting your security efforts in a way that will enable you to get credit for everything positive that you have done, ensuring that your risk assessment is consistent with the regulator's ideas, which may differ significantly from many information security professional's preferred approach, and understanding the level of detail that the regulator expects to see in policies and procedures,” Greene said. Greene is scheduled to speak at HIMSS19 during a session titled “Turning Good Information Security Into Good HIPAA Compliance,” on Wednesday, February 13, from 11:30-12:30 p.m. in room W320. HIMSS19 Preview An inside look at the innovation, education, technology, networking and key events at the HIMSS19 global conference in Orlando. Twitter: SullyHIT Email the writer: tom.sullivan@himssmedia.com  Healthcare IT News is a HIMSS Media publication. 

By now it’s a well-trodden cliché to say that even the most stringent compliance with HIPAA does not mean sensitive health data is actually secure – but what about an inverse of sorts?

That being the idea that strong security can be transformed into good regulatory compliance.

“Good security is not enough to demonstrate HIPAA compliance,” said Adam Greene, Partner at the law firm Davis Wright Tremaine. “Even very mature information security programs are often lacking documentation that the primary regulator is expecting.”

It’s not an entirely uncommon situation for hospitals to be in, either. Greene said that’s because information security shops and compliance teams often are not aligned closely enough to make it happen.

“The challenge I often see is that compliance and information security are in separate silos. Information security professionals are really good at information security, but have not received education on what regulators are seeking to demonstrate compliance,” Greene said. “Compliance staff may be better at understanding how to demonstrate compliance, but may not feel like they have the competence or authority to bring their compliance skills to the information security side of the house.”

Given that scenario, how can hospital and healthcare executives bridge that chasm to ensure that information security teams and compliance efforts operate in lockstep to serve both purposes?

“It is a combination of documenting your security efforts in a way that will enable you to get credit for everything positive that you have done, ensuring that your risk assessment is consistent with the regulator's ideas, which may differ significantly from many information security professional's preferred approach, and understanding the level of detail that the regulator expects to see in policies and procedures,” Greene said.

Greene is scheduled to speak at HIMSS19 during a session titled “Turning Good Information Security Into Good HIPAA Compliance,” on Wednesday, February 13, from 11:30-12:30 p.m. in room W320.

HIMSS19 Preview

An inside look at the innovation, education, technology, networking and key events at the HIMSS19 global conference in Orlando.

Twitter: SullyHIT
Email the writer: tom.sullivan@himssmedia.com 

Healthcare IT News is a HIMSS Media publication. 

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Gut microbes from healthy infants block milk allergy development in mice http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/gut-microbes-healthy-infants-block-milk-allergy-development-mice http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/gut-microbes-healthy-infants-block-milk-allergy-development-mice Mon, 14 Jan 2019 16:00:00 CST NIH News Release NIH-funded study links gut microbiome to food allergy. ]]> Clinical Trial Testing Fecal Microbiota Transplant for Recurrent Diarrheal Disease Begins http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/clinical-trial-testing-fecal-microbiota-transplant-recurrent-diarrheal-disease-begins http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/clinical-trial-testing-fecal-microbiota-transplant-recurrent-diarrheal-disease-begins Mon, 14 Jan 2019 14:00:00 CST NIH News Release Clostridium difficile, commonly referred to as C. diff, is a bacterium that infects the colon and can cause diarrhea, fever, and abdominal pain. ]]> The science is clear: with HIV, undetectable equals untransmittable http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/science-clear-hiv-undetectable-equals-untransmittable http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/science-clear-hiv-undetectable-equals-untransmittable Thu, 10 Jan 2019 16:00:00 CST NIH News Release NIH officials discuss scientific evidence and principles underlying the U=U concept. ]]> AI approach outperformed human experts in identifying cervical precancer http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/ai-approach-outperformed-human-experts-identifying-cervical-precancer http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/ai-approach-outperformed-human-experts-identifying-cervical-precancer Thu, 10 Jan 2019 15:00:00 CST NIH News Release Algorithm could revolutionize cervical cancer screening, especially in low-resource settings ]]> BRCA Exchange aggregates data on thousands of BRCA variants to inform understanding of cancer risk http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/brca-exchange-aggregates-data-thousands-brca-variants-inform-understanding-cancer-risk http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/brca-exchange-aggregates-data-thousands-brca-variants-inform-understanding-cancer-risk Wed, 09 Jan 2019 15:00:00 CST NIH News Release Resource provides information on gene variants to clinicians, researchers, data scientists, patients, and patient advocates. ]]> U of Iowa saves $600,000 a year with new radiology workflow http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/u-iowa-saves-600000-year-new-radiology-workflow http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/u-iowa-saves-600000-year-new-radiology-workflow Tue, 08 Jan 2019 12:03:58 CST at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com The provider organization created the position of reading room coordinator who relieves the resident or radiologists from administrative tasks so they can concentrate on reading the imaging exam. KLAS ranks population health management vendors on partnering and guidance http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/klas-ranks-population-health-management-vendors-partnering-and-guidance http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/klas-ranks-population-health-management-vendors-partnering-and-guidance Thu, 03 Jan 2019 10:10:29 CST at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com  Epic beats Cerner and Allscripts for customer satisfaction – but HealthEC, Health Catalyst, Arcadia and Enli take top spots. NIH study implicates hyperactive immune system in aging brain disorders http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-study-implicates-hyperactive-immune-system-aging-brain-disorders http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-study-implicates-hyperactive-immune-system-aging-brain-disorders Wed, 02 Jan 2019 16:00:00 CST NIH News Release Results suggest a breakdown in brain cell waste system triggers a destructive immune reaction. ]]> Proximity to muscle cells may promote spread of prostate cancer cells, NIH study suggests http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/proximity-muscle-cells-may-promote-spread-prostate-cancer-cells-nih-study-suggests http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/proximity-muscle-cells-may-promote-spread-prostate-cancer-cells-nih-study-suggests Wed, 02 Jan 2019 15:15:00 CST NIH News Release Approximately 11.2 percent of men in the US will be diagnosed with prostate cancer during their lifetime. ]]> HL7 releases FHIR 4 http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/hl7-releases-fhir-4 http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/hl7-releases-fhir-4 Wed, 02 Jan 2019 10:47:15 CST at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources is now normative, and the new edition brings thousands of other updates. What docs want from EHR vendors in 2019 http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/what-docs-want-ehr-vendors-2019 http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/what-docs-want-ehr-vendors-2019 Mon, 31 Dec 2018 08:52:29 CST at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com A little listening and responsiveness could go a long way to help cure alert fatigue and physician burnout in the year ahead. Top 10 Healthcare IT News articles of 2018 http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/top-10-healthcare-it-news-articles-2018 http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/top-10-healthcare-it-news-articles-2018 Fri, 28 Dec 2018 08:07:51 CST at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com Tech titans set their sights on interoperability, Judy Faulkner shared advice for women in health IT and big data breaches continued – revisit those stories and others in our look back at the past 12 months. VA nears decision on replacing Epic scheduling system with Cerner http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/va-nears-decision-replacing-epic-scheduling-system-cerner http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/va-nears-decision-replacing-epic-scheduling-system-cerner Thu, 27 Dec 2018 13:36:16 CST at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com The chair of the House VA Subcommittee on Technology Modernization wants the agency to answer some questions with regard to the $624 million Medical Appointment Scheduling System contract. A C-suite guide to telemedicine http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/c-suite-guide-telemedicine http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/c-suite-guide-telemedicine Thu, 27 Dec 2018 08:02:29 CST at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com NewYork-Presbyterian, UPMC and Thibodaux executives discuss the advantages and imperatives of creating wide-ranging telehealth programs. 5 blockchain developments in 2018 http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/5-blockchain-developments-2018 http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/5-blockchain-developments-2018 Wed, 26 Dec 2018 10:44:58 CST at Most Popular News from healthcareitnews.com Amazon, Change Healthcare and Walmart all made moves worth watching as we head into 2019. Physicians should think twice about promoting medical credit cards to their patients http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/finance-experts-warn-medical-credit-cards?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/finance-experts-warn-medical-credit-cards?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Tue, 20 Feb 2018 10:15:20 CST Joanne Finnegan at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Consumers use credit cards to pay for everything (including the kitchen sink), and the latest trend has people using medical credit cards to pay for healthcare services. But financial experts are warning practices about the pitfalls of promoting so-called medical credit cards to their patients, says the Healthcare Financial Management Association. Trump administration issues proposed rule to expand short-term insurance plans http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/trump-administration-short-term-insurance-rule?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/trump-administration-short-term-insurance-rule?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Tue, 20 Feb 2018 09:56:31 CST Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare A proposed rule issued by three federal agencies on Tuesday would expand limits for short-term health insurance plans from three months to 12 months. CMS's Seema Verma dismissed concerns that the policy shift would destabilize the individual market by siphoning off healthy individuals, arguing the change will have "virtually no impact" on ACA premiums. Under Trump, HHS rolls back policies aimed at protecting LGBT rights http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/trump-hhs-lgbt-rights-alex-azar?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/regulatory/trump-hhs-lgbt-rights-alex-azar?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Tue, 20 Feb 2018 09:31:52 CST Leslie Small at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Though President Donald Trump promised to support LGBT causes during the 2016 campaign, under his watch the Department of Health and Human Services had rolled back several initiatives aimed at protecting the rights of that population. New HHS Secretary Alex Azar could take the department in a different direction. Study: Community navigators can reduce the high cost of 'superusers' in hospital settings http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/patient-engagement/community-navigators-superusers-hospital-visits-decrease?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/patient-engagement/community-navigators-superusers-hospital-visits-decrease?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Tue, 20 Feb 2018 09:08:46 CST Paige Minemyer at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare "Superusers," those costly patients who utilize high levels of hospital care, are a significant burden on the healthcare system. But a new study suggests that pairing them with community navigators can reduce their use of hospital services. Researchers in Tennessee found that the intervention reduced their healthcare encounters by 39%. Patients lack information about imaging exams, study finds http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/patients-lack-information-imaging-exams-radiology-study-yale?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/practices/patients-lack-information-imaging-exams-radiology-study-yale?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Sat, 17 Feb 2018 20:14:46 CST Joanne Finnegan at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Doctors can do a better job providing patients with information before they go for an imaging exam, a new study found. One in five patients shows up for an imaging exam without any information about the test they are about to undergo, according to the study published in Radiology. Most for-profit hospitals will benefit from U.S. tax overhaul, but 2 big-name providers stand to gain the most http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/most-for-profit-hospitals-will-benefit-from-us-tax-overhaul-but-two-big-name-providers?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/most-for-profit-hospitals-will-benefit-from-us-tax-overhaul-but-two-big-name-providers?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 16 Feb 2018 15:23:18 CST Ilene MacDonald at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Most for-profit hospitals stand to gain from the changes to the U.S. tax laws, according to a new Moody’s Investors Service report. But HCA Healthcare and Universal Health Service will be the biggest beneficiaries and could see their operating cash flows go up by 10% or more. North Carolina attorney general seeks more details on Atrium Health-UNC Health Care merger  http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/atrium-health-university-north-carolina-merger-ag-wants-details?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/atrium-health-university-north-carolina-merger-ag-wants-details?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 16 Feb 2018 15:12:13 CST Paige Minemyer at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare North Carolina's attorney general is asking Atrium Health and UNC Health Care to provide more information on their merger plans. AG Josh Stein said he intends to ensure that the planned merger doesn't increase patient costs. 5 medical conditions that cost more than $15K per hospital stay http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/5-medical-conditions-cost-more-than-15k-per-hospital-stay?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/5-medical-conditions-cost-more-than-15k-per-hospital-stay?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 16 Feb 2018 14:01:34 CST Ilene MacDonald at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Heart valve disorders lead the list of the most expensive medical conditions with the highest average cost per inpatient stay, according to an analysis by Business Insider based on 2016 data from Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project. Heart valve disorders, on average, cost $41,878 per stay, the analysis found. Anthem alters controversial ER coverage policies http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/anthem-er-coverage-policy-changes?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/payer/anthem-er-coverage-policy-changes?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 16 Feb 2018 11:50:13 CST Leslie Small at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Seeking to address mounting concerns from providers and other stakeholders, Anthem has made changes to policies it previously rolled out that restrict coverage for emergency room visits. The insurer has implemented a series of “always pay” exceptions for certain circumstances, like when the patient received any kind of surgery or an MRI or CT scan. VA head Shulkin to reimburse disputed European travel expenses, but Dems call for hearing over controversy http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/healthcare/va-head-s-european-trip-drama-continues-shulkin-will-reimburse-disputed-expenses-but-won?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/healthcare/va-head-s-european-trip-drama-continues-shulkin-will-reimburse-disputed-expenses-but-won?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 16 Feb 2018 10:30:06 CST Ilene MacDonald at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare Veterans Affairs Secretary David Shulkin, M.D., says he will reimburse travel expenses that were the subject of an internal investigation into a trip he took to Europe this summer, but that may not put an end to the controversy. One lawmaker has called for Shulkin’s resignation, and four Democrats have requested a hearing about the trip. Allscripts managed to buy Practice Fusion and McKesson for just $50M http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/ehr/allscripts-practice-fusion-onecontent-50m?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss http://medclimate.com/external/index.php?https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/ehr/allscripts-practice-fusion-onecontent-50m?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss Fri, 16 Feb 2018 09:10:53 CST Evan Sweeney at FierceHealthcare: Healthcare In less than six months, Allscripts acquired two EHR platforms by Practice Fusion and McKesson for a grand total of $50 million by divesting a portion of McKesson's business for 27% more than it paid for the entire health IT portfolio. Allscripts President Rick Poulton said the new acquisitions will generate more than $300 million in recurring annual revenue.